Lesson of the week

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by jrjones, Jan 22, 2015.

  1. jrjones

    jrjones Member

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    I learned this week that you should never be honest with your boss. It doesn't matter how much they talk about you receiving honest feedback from those who report to you, it will never work out for you if you give them honest feedback when they ask if anything is bothering or frustrating you.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2015
  2. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    Say nothing, other than that you are happy to be working there.
     
  3. nailbender

    nailbender Member

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    You must be a young guy?
     
  4. telest

    telest Member

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    Poor guy fell for the 'ol "honesty"bit. Just for future reference, this applies to your spouse as well. Lol. :aok
     
  5. davess23

    davess23 Member

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    Nope. It's almost never worth it to speak truth to power. Almost never.

    That's a life lesson, believe me.
     
  6. rodger

    rodger Member

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    Years ago, I was urged by my boss and other people in the organization to tell her what caused a dramatic drop in our business. Everyone knew it was a decision she made. She kept pushing in a meeting of several managers for me to state the issue.

    Stupid me - I stated the reason. A month later, I was terminated by her. She went on to terminate ANYONE who even disagreed with her. I heard the company was forced to survey all the employees in her organization with the topic - "IS YOUR ORGANIZATION MANAGED THROUGH FEAR." People were afraid that their electronic responses could be tracked to them, so few people participated.

    My experience from over 40 years in the work force? Keep your head down and your mouth shut ... nobody really wants to hear constructive, negative feedback. Some respond more harshly than others.
     
  7. bsacamano

    bsacamano Member

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    I can honestly say you should never be completely honest with anyone. Now, the question is, am I being honest when I say that?
     
  8. jrjones

    jrjones Member

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    I usually live by that rule. the one time I didn't? Yeah...never going to do that again.
     
  9. MrLahey

    MrLahey Member

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    Sad world where there is no value in the truth.

    Many above posts are correct though, you should almost NEVER tell them the truth when asked about it like that. Thats a trap to test you.
     
  10. aynirar27

    aynirar27 All You Need Is Rock and Roll Gold Supporting Member

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    this must be a corporate/cubicle type setting.
     
  11. dysorexia

    dysorexia Senior Member

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    You can lie your way to the top. Often times, that's a big part of it.
     
  12. RedneckDerek

    RedneckDerek Member

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    So basically you're a yes-man


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  13. Two-Octave

    Two-Octave Member

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    I asked my boss for an advance on my salary.

    He said,"OK,how much do you need?"

    I replied,"I dunno. How much does an 8 ball cost in this town?"

    Honesty didn't quite work out. --- I'm just sayin'.
     
  14. music321

    music321 Member

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    This isn't a black and white situation. Obviously, there are times when it's better to keep your mouth shut. On some issues, you have to speak up. Although things might be worse for you in the short term, they will be better later on.

    As for the poster that got fired for pointing out his boss's ineptitude, I'll bet that he's in a better position in life all these years later than if he would have stayed with that company.

    A friend of mine has a saying: "I'm not good looking enough to be a "yes-man".
     
  15. TheClev

    TheClev As seen on TV

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    We had a meeting a while ago in which my boss invited us to be completely honest about he we thought the department was being run. Several of my coworkers listed specific and valuable issues that they thought should be addressed. When it came my turn, I just said I was happy where I was and looking forward to upcoming changes. Two weeks later I got a significant raise.

    In a corporate setting, if you're not playing the game at least a little, then you're losing it.
     
  16. davess23

    davess23 Member

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    I'm not a yes-man. I don't "yes" them, or "no" them for that matter. I just do my job, get my pay, and head for home.

    No interest at all in dealing with most C level types-- they tend to have lower emotional IQs than the rest of us. The way it seems they get to the truth is to pay a consultant to come in and disrupt the crap out of everything while they're trying to get up to speed about what's going on, and then submit a report saying what everybody working there knows but nobody feels like talking about, because of the immature, spoiled-brat-style reaction or vindictive reprisal that's almost sure to follow.

    The only time I ever was candid and honest with a CEO about a problem was after basically being bullied into it. The result, of course, was that I found myself in an argument I wasn't going to win with an upset asshole who outranked me and was only interested in proving me wrong because the problem was his treatment of employees (BTW, ironically enough, I had no complaints about his treatment of me). But I'd seen enough of his behavior to predict how he'd react, which is why I resisted saying anything until I was virtually ordered to do so.

    I'll say it again-- speaking truth to power is almost never a good idea. And as far as I'm concerned, feel free to get rid of the "almost"...
     
  17. 9520575

    9520575 Member

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    I know that lesson all too well.

    A couple a months ago I said something like this (a week before I quit mind you):
    "I'm sorry, I was confused. See when you asked my opinion I thought you wanted genuine feedback. Clearly you were looking for me to smile and say everything thing is great."
     
  18. Pally

    Pally Member

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    "How much time would you say you spend each week dealing with these TPS reports?"
     
  19. BMX

    BMX Supporting Member

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    This. Millenials often see the workplace in flat terms where everyone is generally on the same terms and everyone's input is treated equally. It's not necessarily a bad way to see the world but it's unique in a corporate environment.

    A generalization and its possible that the OP is over 30 but I would be surprised.
     

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