Lets go over tone from a non-gear standpoint. Strictly playing.

Guinness Lad

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One thing you really should be aware of is the relationship (distance) between your fretting and picking hand. Play the same basic thing from the first fret to as high as you can play fret wise on the guitar. I have noticed that once I reach higher up in the fret board that notes will drop out, not sure why this happens but if I shift my picking hand one direction or the other everything jumps back up in volume.

This is something I never gave much thought about, but after playing live I wondered what happened during a couple solos where I was kicking then went to play higher and all the sudden I wasn't heard as easily.
 
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OTOH, a player tends to find similar sounds in various rigs because they want to and adjust accordingly.

This is at the core of it to me.

I mean sure, if Robben Ford (insert great player here) started using a high-gain modern Marshall or EVH with all kinds of pedal changes he would SOUND different... But it is nonsensical really to discuss this - because he wouldn't do that. He doesn't like that.

So here is the crux of it: To the question of does it change your tone - it would also need to change your taste. Because Robben if faced with this situation at a gig would dial up the amp to get what he likes in it. Bringing him to some decent semblance of his sound that we all know. You would still identify and possibly marvel at the tone he pulls from it.

Not to mention a great player like Robben, even on such an odd amp choice - would STILL sound better - because of his hands, than a lesser player using his Dumble rig. Lots of guys have great amps and gear. But not lots of guys have that tone.
 

Serious Poo

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Ask a classical player. Or a bass player. It's all about the plucking hand.

There is probably nothing we can do with the fretting hand to affect tone except make a mistake stopping the string at the given fret. This is where the guitar is like the piano. Press and play. It is the other hand that makes the difference in tone. Very un-piano.

Vibrato is a wavering in pitch. It may sound like it affects tone but it doesn't.

My experience has been very different. I've found that left hand technique can impact tone to a great deal. The pressing down on a note just after picking it can give a slightly muted sound, picking an already pressed note can give a sharper tone. There are many shades of tone & timbre throughout that entire spectrum. A musician's technique used for hammer-ons and pull-offs can greatly impact the tone on both electric and acoustic. Pulling off sideways can add harmonic overtones that can give the tone a mewing or crying-like tone, while releasing or pulling off vertically gives a cleaner tone. Rapidly sliding down the fretboard into a note adds harmonic overtones that can can give a singing or snarling voice to a note, depending on how its done.
 

202dy

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Those affect dynamics, not tone. With the exception that some of it can be considered ornamentation. But none affect core tone.
 

Tone_Terrific

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Those affect dynamics, not tone. With the exception that some of it can be considered ornamentation. But none affect core tone.
No wonder these debates are never resolved as it becomes clear that we are simply not talking about the same elements.
Getting back the the OP I have yet to hear anybody demonstrate any to way affect tone, in the way that tone controls affect tone, from fretting variations.
Attack, decay, release and sustain are variable via fretting (damping, vibrato, pressure) and certainly with picking, but not 'tone.'
Picking position sure can alter tonal content but a fret is just a fret.
 

Serious Poo

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No wonder these debates are never resolved as it becomes clear that we are simply not talking about the same elements.
Getting back the the OP I have yet to hear anybody demonstrate any to way affect tone, in the way that tone controls affect tone, from fretting variations.
Attack, decay, release and sustain are variable via fretting (damping, vibrato, pressure) and certainly with picking, but not 'tone.'
Picking position sure can alter tonal content but a fret is just a fret.
I believe that tone controls only affect EQ, not harmonic content and overtones. IMHO, those are what really impact tone & timbre. I believe that all of the items I described above create or remove harmonic overtones.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timbre
 

Tone_Terrific

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I believe that tone controls only affect EQ, not harmonic content and overtones
If you cannot hear the full range (spectrum) of overtones their presence in the signal is irrelevant. Boosting or cutting the levels is audible.
This is (one of the ways) why different gear sounds different.

Even so, adding or subtracting overtones from the signal based on the composition of one's finger (or whatever) that is pressing the string to the fret seems like a big stretch to me and certainly not enough to define one's tone.
 
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No wonder these debates are never resolved as it becomes clear that we are simply not talking about the same elements.

Yes, when it gets down to the minutia of word definition and naming conventions the way this thread did on response #1, you know you are in for a bumpy ride.
 

Serious Poo

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If you cannot hear the full range (spectrum) of overtones their presence in the signal is irrelevant. Boosting or cutting the levels is audible.
This is (one of the ways) why different gear sounds different.

Even so, adding or subtracting overtones from the signal based on the composition of one's finger (or whatever) that is pressing the string to the fret seems like a big stretch to me and certainly not enough to define one's tone.
Let's agree to disagree on this one. My playing experience has guided me in a different direction.
 

dewey decibel

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Theory:

Vibrato affects the harmonic content of a note in different ways

Oh, for sure. For instance, I love playing with feedback, many times when a note starts to take off you can get it to change overtones by giving it a little wobble.

No wonder these debates are never resolved as it becomes clear that we are simply not talking about the same elements.
Getting back the the OP I have yet to hear anybody demonstrate any to way affect tone, in the way that tone controls affect tone, from fretting variations.

Read my earlier posts (I'm open to debate).
 




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