light dope silicon

Discussion in 'Amps/Cabs Tech Corner: Amplifier, Cab & Speakers' started by leodiditright, Oct 20, 2008.

  1. leodiditright

    leodiditright Supporting Member

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    I ask Rob at Truetone cabinets to help me choose a 15" speaker and he suggested a Weber California with paper cone and light dope ?? since the suggestion was addressed to a musician not a technician, what's this light dope silicon stuff has to do with tone?? any help please, Rob is very scarce in his answers.
     
  2. TweeDLX

    TweeDLX Member

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    Hi,
    Dope is the shiny black stuff that you see around the outer perimeter of the cone. It does affect tone to an extent. It dampens, or restricts cone vibration to a small degree. If you use a fair amount of distortion, you may want more than light dope. I recently ordered some Webers with light dope. They developed cone cry until I redoped them to a heavier coverage. That said, apparently some players are able to work around the cone cry thing by adapting their playing style.

    Mike
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2008
  3. leodiditright

    leodiditright Supporting Member

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    Thanks, what do you mean by "using a fair amount of distortion"? speaker distortion or using a distortion pedal? I want to buy this cab only for playing at home, so I'll never play loud enough to get speaker breakup anyway. What I'm looking for is a 15 incher with a big bottom, slighly scooped mids and a sweet treble top and since I'll be playing this cab only for solo guitar work, it needs to fill the room, no needs to sit in a band mix.
     
  4. leodiditright

    leodiditright Supporting Member

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  5. tlpruitt

    tlpruitt Member

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    Silicon is used to make semiconductors and integrated circuits. Silicon is not the thick flexible glue/sealant you get at hardware stores that I believe you are referring to. That would be silicone.
     
  6. leodiditright

    leodiditright Supporting Member

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    Ok, silicone with an E, still don't understand why Weber Speakers offers all these silicone dope options without any explanations about what differences those makes in term of tone or feel. We are musicians, how can we give a damn **** about such details if we don't know their impact on tone or other factors (durability maybe?)
     
  7. Rosewood

    Rosewood Member

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    The more dope, the tighter it sounds, and the less cone cry sometimes. Sorta the reverse of human dope eh.:jo
     
  8. tlpruitt

    tlpruitt Member

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    From the Weber web site:

    Doping is the shiny goop you see on the surround of a speaker. Besides extending the life of the surround, it also acts as a shock absorber to help keep the cone under control at higher volumes. The downside is that it also dampens cone vibrations and therefore reduces the potential character and texture of the speaker. If you are going to bend/sustain notes in the area above the 10th fret on the high E string and at high volumes with heavy distortion, then you need the doping to help prevent ghost notes and cone cry that could result from the extreme cone vibrations. Othewise, I would get the speaker undoped. Many players prefer the raw, undamped tone of the undoped speaker and they learn to modulate their finger pressure when noting in the area that causes cone cry.
    Pre-Rola Treatment For this doping, the cone is artificially aged and chemically treated. Vibration dampner compound is also applied to the cone body and surround.

    If you have not experienced "ghost notes" and "cone cry" then consider yourself lucky. It is mainly a problem with 12" speakers. The less dope the more freely the speaker cone can move.
     

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