Lightweight bass amp that can hang with a band...

Discussion in 'Bass Area; The Bottom Line' started by Guitarshreda, Dec 9, 2017.

  1. NashSG

    NashSG Member

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    Bass combos that sound big enough to hang are usually heavier and more awkward than just getting a cab and a head. Lightweight head is no problem to find and used with a small 1x15 cab with casters are pretty easy to move around. You get good movable 4x10 cab, you can hang about anywhere.
     
  2. chrisjnyc

    chrisjnyc Member

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    My bass player bought a Rumble 150 combo used for about $100, and its crazy loud for rehearsals. Not sure why you would need 500 watts unless you are playing with a really loud band
     
  3. Jeff Scott

    Jeff Scott Member

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    Your band must play really quietly......................... ;)
     
  4. BarneyFife

    BarneyFife Supporting Member

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    I've got an Aguilar AG700 (about 5-6 lbs) and a Bergantino HDN 1x12 (28 lbs). I put the head in a computer case, put it around my neck along with the bass soft case, and carry it all in one trip easily. And it sounds killer!! No problems at all with volume. If I ever needed more I would just add another 1x12.
     
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  5. somedude

    somedude Member

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    I do the same with a Mesa D800, 210 & 115... except it comes with it's own gig bag that I carry like a purse.

    Bass on my back, amp like a purse, and I carry a cab in each hand like they're suitcases. One trip to load in/out.
     
  6. JCW308

    JCW308 Supporting Member

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    The MarkBass CMD121P is an absolute beast and super light / tiny. Can keep up with just about anything.
     
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  7. fe911

    fe911 Supporting Member

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    Lots of options for what you are looking for. I had a few lightweight heads, prefer head and cab. I didn't like markbass's tone. Very good amps though. My favorite tone came from the tone hammer 500, hard to get a bad tone out of it. Great for jazz, R&B, funk, and lighter rock. I have a genz Benz 2x10 500 watt combo that kills...

    Unfortunately, we usually play pretty hard rock loudly. Two Marshall half stacks.... The tone hammer started to disappear in the mix. It was too bad, I really liked everything about it. Not undercabbed at all, I have 4x12,2x12,8x10(at the time, not any more). All 4 ohm. I ended up with the GK fusion 800. Not that it is more powerful, it is. The tone just punches through, and sounds really good in the mix. But, would still prefer the tone hammer, to my ears. More of a portaflex vs. SVT thing.
     
  8. T Dizz

    T Dizz Member

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    I used to gig and practice with an Ampeg BA115. That was a great amp. Tilts back and direct out too.
     
  9. retroLS1

    retroLS1 Supporting Member

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    I have a TC Electronic BH550 that doesn't have any problem hanging with a full rock band in live rehearsal & gigging scenarios. Small, light, sounds good, and is inexpensive. Hard to ask for more.
     
  10. Igotsoul4u

    Igotsoul4u Member

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    IMO you need no less then 300watts to compete with a drummer. At 300 watts you can still expect to be close to maxing out the amp with a loud rock band which is why most people go for 500 watts. I have an Gallien Kruger MB500 into a 2x10 cab and it's loud and clear. No issues at all. The combo version would be a good option. MB212 is 40lbs and 500 watts
     
  11. 5150user

    5150user Member

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    My reply is related to 100 watt Bass Amps in general. Perfectly fine, if it is a loud 100 watt amp. They do vary, believe it or not. If it is not a loud 100 watt amp, then no. Some amps thump harder than others. It matters greatly. 200 plus watts should be able to do it well, and if it won't, then it's not a good amp, regardless of brand / model.
     
  12. hubberjub

    hubberjub Silver Supporting Member

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    I am also a fan (and owner) of the newest Fender Rumble 500 combo. I was going to get a lightweight, gigging amp. At 36 lbs, it fit the bill perfectly, but it took me a while to pull the trigger because I convinced myself that it wasn't a "real" amp. I had borrowed a Markbass CMD 102P from a friend. I liked it, but it lacked the vintage character that I was looking for. If you're looking for a good gigging amp that can do the warm R&B, up to the grind-y tube-ish sound of 70s and 80s rock, the Fender fits the bill very well. Also, while I was at first hesitant to get a combo as compared to a separate lightweight head and cab, as soon as I realized how nice it is to get my bass/amp/accessories into the gig with only one trip, I was sold.
     
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  13. kwicked

    kwicked Supporting Member

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    ^Rumble 500. Our bass player has one and it sounds great, is plenty of power by itself for anything we do other than outside, and has a good DI out for mixer if needed. 36lbs
     
  14. 9fingers

    9fingers Supporting Member

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    A very good bass player friend traded off much more expensive (and heavier) bass amps & got a Rumble 500. His was the bass amp on stage for a pretty big festival last fall & it sounded great with a big variety of players, bands & styles plugged into it all day long. Came through loud & clear (DI out for FOH).
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2017
  15. wheat

    wheat Member

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    I run a GK MB500 into an SWR Workingman's 2x10 and an old Yorkville 1x15. Even with just the 2x10, it's plenty loud enough to keep up with a drummer and guitarist. With both cabs, it's all I'll ever need.
     
  16. 5150user

    5150user Member

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    My apologies: I forgot to add, "100 watts with a 15" Speaker". Some 100 watt 1x15" Combo amps are pretty dang loud, and can hang with a loud drummer; if he isn't mic'd up. If he starts amplifying his drums, you definitely need more power.

    Another point is that some people play louder than necessary. I attended a concert with Lynyrd Skynyrd and ZZ Top. Skynyrd was crazy loud. ZZ Top dialed it back a little, and sounded much better. Those 3 guys had killer tone.
     
  17. Spacehead_

    Spacehead_ Member

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    Markbass - super lightweight, great sound, LOUD!!
     
  18. 5150user

    5150user Member

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    A longtime friend just sent me a picture of his new bass amp. A Trace Elliot 500 watt all tube head. Would have been way overkill for the volume levels we used to play at.

    I inquired why he needed to go that big? He said 2 guitarists using tube heads and 4x12" cabinets were drowning out his 350 watt 1x15" setup. He plans to try using both a 6x10" and a 1x15" with his 500 watt head.

    I guess it just depends upon who you are playing with?
     
  19. Leep Dog

    Leep Dog Member

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    I have a new Fender Rumble 500 head and matching 2x10 cabinet. It works for me, and I wouldn't say we are exactly quiet.
     
  20. royd

    royd Member

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    I recommend to people that for bass you want 10X’s the power of the guitar player with roughly the same speaker area or more. Why that much more? 1. In general bass frequencies require more power to get the same volume because woofers tend to be less efficient than speakers that reproduce higher frequencies. (The Eminence Red Fang guitar speaker is rated at 103 dB while their Kappa Pro bass speaker is 97 dB - The Kappa will require 4X’s the power to get the same volume. Many guitar speakers are rated around 100 dB while bass speakers are often around 95) 2. As a bass player, you’ll likely be playing clean much of the time. Clean requires more power. 3. Our ears are more sensitive to some frequencies than others and even though a dB meter may tell you the bass is as loud as the lead guitar, your ears will tell you something else.

    Remember that most bass amps (heads or combos) give you the wattage with their lowest ohm rating - often 4 ohms, occasionally 2.67 or 2 ohms. Most smaller cabs or the internal speakers on most combos are 8 ohms which means you’ll have approximately half the advertised wattage. My 800 watt head actually produces 400 into a 8 ohm load. To get the whole 800, I need a 4 ohm or 2.67 ohm load. I use a single 8ohm cab so actually run 400 watts all of the time.

    A watt is a watt is a watt. 100 watts (assuming it is measured accurately) is always the same regardless of tube, solid state, or class D. Doubling the power only gives you 3db’s more volume assuming all else is equal. Doubling speaker cone area does the same - all else equal. BUT speakers vary wildly in how efficient they are. You might look at one cab that gives you 96 dB efficiency while another is 100. That is the same as more than doubling your power. Look also at the max db’s A given cab can produce and you may see even larger differences. Finally, be aware that we never know how that efficiency is measured either... a given cab may be 98 dB at one frequency peak but only 95 through most of the range of your bass...

    So... watts are cheap right now. Get as much as you can afford. There is no downside to more. You don’t have to turn that volume control up to 11. The class D amps sound great, are very light weight, and provide high wattage. Speakers are where the rubber hits the road. Get the best you can afford here. You want speakers that you like the sound of, you can easily schlep, and can go as loud as you need. I prefer a separate cab and head over a combo because that gives you flexibility here, where you need it the most.
     
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