Line6 releasing HX Effects at NAMM & more stuff in 2018!!!

jaded_musician

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what makes a live bands sound so different than a recording of a live band coming through the same sound system?

It's all the live reflections off the band itself, drums, amps, monitors and vocals. They don't come from one spot. An open back cabinet throws sound in multiple directions and from every point in the room create a different sonic result.

We need a multi-point FRFR system that throws sound in 360 degrees from multiple points.

or

use a power amp into a traditional cab. But why should we accept real life when we can fake every part of it.
 

maxnew40

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Messages
947
what makes a live bands sound so different than a recording of a live band coming through the same sound system?

It's all the live reflections off the band itself, drums, amps, monitors and vocals. They don't come from one spot. An open back cabinet throws sound in multiple directions and from every point in the room create a different sonic result.

We need a multi-point FRFR system that throws sound in 360 degrees from multiple points.

or

use a power amp into a traditional cab. But why should we accept real life when we can fake every part of it.
It also has something to do with the fact that the vocal mics are picking up all of the stage volume and other mics on stage picking up sounds from other instruments as well. I could really hear the difference when I watched A Motly Crue farewell concert recently on TV, most of the backup vocals were backing tracks and the backup vocals had a very different sound from live mics for the lead vocals ( It sounded like the backups vocals were from the original studio recordings).
 

Watt McCo

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10,307
It also has something to do with the fact that the vocal mics are picking up all of the stage volume and other mics on stage picking up sounds from other instruments as well. I could really hear the difference when I watched A Motly Crue farewell concert recently on TV, most of the backup vocals were backing tracks and the backup vocals had a very different sound from live mics for the lead vocals ( It sounded like the backups vocals were from the original studio recordings).
I think that has more to do with them being recorded with decent mics on suspension system by real singers rather than a - not awesome singer that is trying entertain a crowd, hold a microphone in a cool posture and sing at the same time?
 

jaded_musician

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3,331
It also has something to do with the fact that the vocal mics are picking up all of the stage volume and other mics on stage picking up sounds from other instruments as well. I could really hear the difference when I watched A Motly Crue farewell concert recently on TV, most of the backup vocals were backing tracks and the backup vocals had a very different sound from live mics for the lead vocals ( It sounded like the backups vocals were from the original studio recordings).
Yeah, it's just not the fact that it's an amplified sound verses an acoustic sound. I think some of it is dynamic range as well. Live music tends to have larger dynamics to it. A cab in a room tends to have that as well to my ears. The attack of a note can be louder and not as controlled, less compressed. I've often thought part of making the amp in the room sound was to artificially add multi-band expansion as opposed to compression to the signal.
 

Sadhaka

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1,305
Aren’t Cabinet sims (simulations?) and cabinet IR’s different by their very nature?

I thought cab sims were a digital recreation of what a particular cab sounds like when captured by a particular mic, both of which are coded.

An IR is a frequency sweep of a reverb tail that comes through an actual cabinet captured by an actual particular mic that results in a sound file that recordings are played into which creates a ‘space’ for those sounds to run through.

I have always wondered why a modelled amp’s modelled speaker had to be heard through a modelled mic before they could go through a real speaker...


Whhhooooooaaaaaaaaaa..... Maybe Line6 has come up with modelled IEM’s that scan the frequency efficiency of our ears and then convert incoming sound so that we hear EXACTLY what we are supposed to!

NB: I literally just got out of bed after a terrible sleep... very hot overnight here :-(
 

DenHugo

Member
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30
I have absolutely no idea whether this would be "controversial" or whether Line 6 would be working on it, but they would be the perfect company to adress the ongoing "cab-IR/FRFR vs. amp in a room" debate as they're into both hard- and software.
And let's face it, one of the key issues for modelers not being more widely accepted (at least for live) has got to be monitoring feel, so many people are still using a rather typical power amplification and cabs.
Coming up with a clever algorithm that would sort of defeat just the mic portion of the IR'd signal on the monitoring path only (while retaining FR compatibility) - that'd be quite something.
They would not be the first: Kemper has done it and they call it pure cab:

https://www.kemper-amps.com/news/11/Groundbreaking-Pure-Cabinet-technology-for-the-Profiler
 

Willowdale

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1,924
Since it's been confirmed that the new HX Effects unit is not the new Line6 product that the guy saw at the Vai Academy.........What is it??? I have to guess it's either a cool guitar cab looking FRFR, or a HX combo amp:cool:
 




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