• New Sponsor: ShipNerd, Ship Your Gear with Us... for less! Click Here.

Lisa X only practices 2 to 3 hours a day

jeff_lebowski

Member
Messages
1,349
I just spent time listening on spotify and she can play really well but honestly it left me feeling flat.

I think the issue is the internet has made the world so small that everyone kind of has the same influences and teachers. Everyone has the same access to everything all the time and it starts to all run together.

If you would have told me her songs were guthrie govan songs from 15 years ago I would have believed you.
 
M

Member 37136

This is a simple concept to grasp. The more pristine and more powerful your brain and its connections are, the easier you will pick things up. The less talented and older you are, the more practice will be required and progress will be much slower, since the brain struggles.

You would probably enjoy a childhood development class at your local community college.
 
Messages
6,371
Lets be honest. Who here actually practices at all? Sitting on the couch with your guitar while watching Netflix don't count.

When I was younger I'd do these insane marathon sessions when I would get up in the morning at 8 or 9 and practice between eating, job searching, and other stuff and finally go to bed late at night after 11 p.m. after practicing for hours and hours. Weekends were even longer. It wasn't so much that I was driven to practice (even though I sort of was) but it was I'd gotten a new guitar that made me want to play play play. It elevated my technique once I got a really great instrument. Scales, modes, chords, picking, arpeggios, phrasing, working
on tone shaping, working on getting a better sound working on gelling with a band better, working on writing songs/music. I still have a library of guitar books with material to practice.

I've condensed a lot of those techniques to a shorter small exercises so I retain the technique I have but I just don't have the time like I did back then in my twenties. But yeah, I did. Some people call it "talent" or a predisposition to excel at a given task but I just about wore that guitar out when I was through with it. And the one after that literally had divots in
the frets. Those were the days when I had a couple of guitars but kept playing one guitar to excess so all the muscle memory knew where every little position was on that specific
fretboard.
 

guitargeek6298

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,266
Those were the days when I had a couple of guitars but kept playing one guitar to excess so all the muscle memory knew where every little position was on that specific
fretboard.
My first "real" guitar was an American strat, which I played to death. For a couple years I just played it constantly. Eventually I got another guitar, a Hamer, and that became my main instrument and the strat was barely touched.

Years later, I decided I wanted to play the strat again, and brought it in to have the frets dressed. When I got it back, he told me the frets were in the worst shape he's ever seen. "It took me seven hours! "

I was a teenager with lots of time and motivation.

The Hamer I actually wore through the finish on the neck I played it so much.

I'm lucky if I get a couple hours a week, now.
 

GT100

Member
Messages
4,126
With Practice its Critical that you do it the right way. Much more critical than spending countless hours each day.
Playing as fast as you can isn’t practicing -even if your just concerned about chops.
Efficient practice involves analyzing what you are doing wrong and correcting it.
Playing things slowly and correctly. Then working them up to speed.
Sounds simple and of course everyone knows this.
But yet most don’t do this correctly...
 

casiotone1331

Member
Messages
180
My band teacher used to yell at us if he heard us say "practice makes perfect". He woul interject "no, PERFECT PRACTICE makes perfect". Makes sense. I could bang on my guitar twice as long as Lisa X did and still not be any further ahead than she would be.

30 minutes of focused practice a day is more than enough. Otherwise you're just cementing in old habits.
 

Frater B

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,538
I’ve heard Zakir Husain say he practices 2-3 hours a day and that’s to keep his chops up.
 

Bucksfan70

Member
Messages
985
In this video, she is asked by Kiko Loureiro how many hours she practices, and she says around 2 hours. This basically crushes the "these kids have been practicing countless hours since they were born" theory.

People are perplexed by this but is not surprising. I theorized this in previous threads before watching this video. All it proves is that it came much easier for her due to a more powerful brain that is suited for this particular skill of fine motor movements.

This is a simple concept to grasp. The more pristine and more powerful your brain and its connections are, the easier you will pick things up. The less talented and older you are, the more practice will be required and progress will be much slower, since the brain struggles.

So, for mere mortals like us with average brains to even come close to the level of Lisa X, we would need to practice our butts off for decades to make up for the lack of talent and even then, you'll still fall short of her skills.

Kiko goes on this sermon about quality vs quantity when that's not the reason why she is so good lol is like telling an average joe that if you just do the right quality practice, you'll be as good as Lebron James, Cristiano Ronaldo, Messi, Tiger Wood, Phelps, etc


i don't find this hard to believe at all. 2 to 3 hours will turn you into a face melter.

start slow and do whatever you are practicing correctly and slowly speed up. pretty soon you simply start getting better. then, after a while of doing it correctly, it becomes an instant muscle memory reflex and everything becomes easy which allows you to become free, on the inside of your mind, to be creative.
 

ZeyerGTR

Member
Messages
4,088
proves that talented people don't need to practice as much and progress faster
Nobody ever said otherwise. The fact is that even IF she only practiced 2-3 hours a day since she was a kid, that's WAY more than the average person. The quality of the practice is also critical - was she actually focused during those 2-3 hours, or just noodling and playing things she already knew how to play? IMHO the key takeaway from books like "Talent is Overrated" is not that there's no such thing as talent or inherent differences between people, it's that in the grand scheme it doesn't matter much. Focused practice, good teachers, finding the right opportunities to learn at each stage, continuing to improve every single day - that's what's important in becoming great at what you do. Also, nobody can be great at everything. BB King isn't Steve Vai who isn't Joe Pass. They're all masters in their own way.
 

Cedar

Member
Messages
1,221
Nobody ever said otherwise. The fact is that even IF she only practiced 2-3 hours a day since she was a kid, that's WAY more than the average person. The quality of the practice is also critical - was she actually focused during those 2-3 hours, or just noodling and playing things she already knew how to play? IMHO the key takeaway from books like "Talent is Overrated" is not that there's no such thing as talent or inherent differences between people, it's that in the grand scheme it doesn't matter much. Focused practice, good teachers, finding the right opportunities to learn at each stage, continuing to improve every single day - that's what's important in becoming great at what you do. Also, nobody can be great at everything. BB King isn't Steve Vai who isn't Joe Pass. They're all masters in their own way.
In other words, inherent talent is real, it just doesn't matter.
 

chanley

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
758
Lots of interesting topics in this discussion! I find myself thinking about this concept once in awhile, (how we learn, what do I really want to learn, why.....).

I agree that a young mind learns faster than an adult. It's just the way we are wired. I also think it's worth noting that everyone learns differently. For me, it's why I can't watch certain You tube videos. Some explain in a way that I can connect with, others...well, I guess I'm not ready for them yet. For example, I try to watch Eric Johnson's mini-lessons. I have a hard time following. But, that's probably more a reflection of my lack of experience/knowledge rather than learning style. On the other hand, even though the topics are pushing the edge of my current musical knowledge, I can watch and comprehend most of bukovac's videos! (granted, I may have to rewatch a few times to get some of those chord shapes he does!)

One thing I don't think I agree with is the "Gladwell 10,000 hour" thing. I don't think that 2 humans, even it they both start at zero experience, are going to end up at the same level at the end of 10,000 hours. But, in all fairness, he did say that " the key to achieving world-class expertise in any skill, is, to a large extent, a matter of practicing the correct way, for a total of around 10,000 hours". I agree with the "correct way" part, not sure I'm on board with the rest of the statement.

Since March of this year, (start of covid/work from home), I've been playing for about 60-90 minutes a day. I enjoy it, I've definitely improved (in relation to where I was before covid), and for the LOVE OF GOD....I have realized that I need to find a good teacher!
 

ZeyerGTR

Member
Messages
4,088
In other words, inherent talent is real, it just doesn't matter.
I look at it like this (my opinion of course, based on reading some of those books): some people start a marathon at the starting line, some start at the 2 mile marker. Unless you're missing a leg or something, you can probably get to the finish line with enough work. It doesn't mean everyone runs at exactly the same speed, but everyone has to put in the work.
 




Trending Topics

Top Bottom