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Little Wing Unfinished?

AintNoEddie

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
552
Yeah, it is sublime. I read this great quote in a Guitar Technique special edition, quoting a past Rolling Stones article as „painfully short and painfully beautiful. It’s like your grandfather coming back from the dead and hanging out with you for a couple of minutes and then going away. It‘s perfect, then it‘s gone.“

Nothing to add, really...
 

Drew66

Member
Messages
623
I absolutely love Jimi and Little Wing but all of his studio recordings are just jumping off points for me. The live recordings are where his music really comes alive. As previously mentioned the version of Little Wing on the original In the West is top notch. To me nobody does it better (and I have much love for SRV and his version) and this is as good as it gets.
 

guitarsan

Member
Messages
177
As the OP, I wanted to say the responses overall have been great so far!

And they made me want to research this more and I found this awesome video of Eddie Kramer, Jimi's engineer and Chas Chandler, Jimi's manager/producer talking about the making of Little Wing.

It's worthwhile to hear their story of the process and Eddie himself commenting on "Take two" which he says is a "rawer version of the song", "Jimi just sort of stretching out, feeling his oats with the song" "and it's raw, in your face, it's bleeding, this one" and I can go with that, said it better than I did, I'll admit, even if he's not commenting on the final take. That's what I was hearing in my re-listen. And that glockenspiel is still too damn loud! :D I need less glockenspiel!

Little Wing, Behind the Scenes:


 
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hank57

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
8,365
It was not created in 2019. It was made by almost unknown artist when technology vastly underdeveloped compared to now. Also, there wasn’t an unlimited budget and unlimited studio time.

It was as recorded with twenty minutes left of a session.

I pains me that people use the reference point of today to look at art from another time.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wind_Cries_Mary?wprov=sfti1
 

Banditt

Member
Messages
1,169
In the same version Brandford teaches us all how to phrase and play over the descending minor seventh chords.
Absolutely!, Love what Marsalis did on that tune! Great lesson on soloing in that song is to listen to his note and scale choices! I've played that tune with some pretty bad-ass fusion cats, and many emulate his choices. Nice offset to Hiram's more fiery wailing....great together!
 

Danny D

Member
Messages
229
Yes Sir!
They were great together. Sting provided a financially lucrative stage for great players to relax and express themselves with absolute appropriateness for the songs.
 

monwobobbo

Member
Messages
6,106
Jimi was a perfectionist. with that in mind he didn't release stuff he wasn't happy with. i agree that his music often came to life when performed live. he played with each song live just to see where it could go.

the live version that most of you seem to like best is from the Royal Albert Hall 2/24/69 concert. this was filmed and a good quality recording exists of the whole show plus another show performed a few days before. it is still tangled up with rights holders though the Hendrix estate has announced it was going to be released in a deluxe edition about 3 years ago.
 

Ramboorider

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
883
How do you define “power chords?” The definition I’m familiar with is root-fifth, but there are none of those in D&D’s “Little Wing.” The third is the most prominent note in that first chord.
You're right, I'm using the wrong term - they're not power chords. I'm talking about the kind of big three chord repeating pattern he plays for pretty much the first 15 seconds of this "D&D" version:


It's kind of loud and very orchestral and mildly bombastic and really doesn't have anything to do with the delicate chord melody picking that Hendrix (and SRV) did in the intro. To me, it sets the totally wrong tone for the song. Although after about 15 seconds when he comes out of that big chord statement, it gets really pretty really fast with EC and Duane playing those interwoven lines. Interestingly, when I was looking for a YouTube of this version to insert, I found a live version he did much more recently with JJ Cale where he plays something a lot closer to the Hendrix/SRV intro and then just hits that three chord pattern once or twice to transition out of the more delicately picked part of the intro. So maybe he's seen the error of his ways ;)

I don't dislike Clapton's version, but I like it WAAAAAY less than the way Hendrix and SRV played it live.
 
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sahhas

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
15,660
It’s great hearing the behind the scenes stuff on Hendrix songs!!!

As the OP, I wanted to say the responses overall have been great so far!

And they made me want to research this more and I found this awesome video of Eddie Kramer, Jimi's engineer and Chas Chandler, Jimi's manager/producer talking about the making of Little Wing.

It's worthwhile to hear their story of the process and Eddie himself commenting on "Take two" which he says is a "rawer version of the song", "Jimi just sort of stretching out, feeling his oats with the song" "and it's raw, in your face, it's bleeding, this one" and I can go with that, said it better than I did, I'll admit, even if he's not commenting on the final take. That's what I was hearing in my re-listen. And that glockenspiel is still too damn loud! :D I need less glockenspiel!

Little Wing, Behind the Scenes:

 

Tiny Montgomery

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,863
You're right, I'm using the wrong term - they're not power chords. I'm talking about the kind of the kind of big three chord repeating pattern he plays for pretty much the first 15 seconds of this "D&D" version:


It's kind of loud and very orchestral and mildly bombastic and really doesn't have anything to do with the delicate chord melody picking that Hendrix (and SRV) did in the intro. To me, it sets the totally wrong tone for the song. Although after about 15 seconds when he comes out of that big chord statement, it gets really pretty really fast with EC and Duane playing those interwoven lines. Interestingly, when I was looking for a YouTube of this version to insert, I found a live version he did much more recently with JJ Cale where he plays something a lot closer to the Hendrix/SRV intro and then just hits that three chord pattern once or twice to transition out of the more delicately picked part of the intro. So maybe he's seen the error of his ways ;)

I don't dislike Clapton's version, but I like it WAAAAAY less than the way Hendrix and SRV played it live.
None of them played it like Jimi. Clapton and Duane didn’t try to.
 

mc5nrg

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,909
Back in the olden days, the term “power chord” was often used for distorted rock guitar rhythm playing like on Who or Hendrix elpees, not just the root and fifth approach to chording it later was applied to.

Psst: some of Jimi’s chord shapes leave out the low fifth.
 




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