Live recording - band in church worship setting

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by marks, Feb 13, 2008.


  1. marks

    marks Member

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    I wonder if I could ask your advice on live recording.

    I'm part of a group that plays in a church setting and we'd like to try live recording in a rather more serious way than we have been. At the moment we've been taking FOH feeds and can mix them with ambient mikes but that produces a very crude mix. We'd like to attempt multitrack live recording so we can mixdown at a later stage and add fx as appropriate.

    The band we have consists of drums, bass, acoustic piano, synth, 2 guitars, sax, lead vocal and 3 BGV. All of these are miked and fed via multicore to a 32 channel Allen & Heath console. There we can add fx for the live mix. We have a congregation of around 600 people so can have 2 ambient mikes to pick up them.

    What would be really helpful to know is if someone has experience of live recording a setup like this to save us reinventing the wheel.

    I guess we have a number of options. One would be to split the signal going into the FOH desk so we can have a feed to a hard disk recorder. Any suggestions on what type of splitter device we could use?

    Alternatively we could try taking group mixes from the desk and recording those. Currently we have an 8 channel MOTU interface for HD recording but think we might need more channels if we want more control over what we have recorded.

    I'd appreciate any advice or tips people have particularly if you have done this before.

    Many thanks.
     
  2. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    The A&H probably has individual outputs on each channel. Either that or you can tap into an insert.

    Rent an Alesis HD24-XR and hook it up.

    Loudboy
     
  3. JCM 800

    JCM 800 Member

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    You don't need a separate splitter. Each channel on the A&H has a direct out that is not affected by anything other than the channel gain. You still have inserts for your live mix. Take those direct outs into your recording system of choice. The A&H is a great mixer for your exact situation.
     
  4. jmcloud

    jmcloud Member

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    I don't know what kind of budget you're on, but here's what I'd recommend from my own experience. You need a computer capable of running a basic recording software. Get yourself a Presonus FirePod or FireStudio (or two, since you can easily daisy-chain them). They have a firewire connection to the PC. You have a lot of inputs, so your computer will need to be capable of handling the task.

    Come off the direct outs into the inputs on the Presonus interfaces, whichever you should choose. Then you can mix and edit later. I've used this same setup in the past in live settings, and it works great! The Presonus interfaces are very nice.
     
  5. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    The Alesis' converters smoke the Firepod, and you don't need to take a computer to the gig. It also won't crash, or need any tweaking.

    Just push record.

    Loudboy
     
  6. marks

    marks Member

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    Thanks guys for the responses.

    Sorry I was a bit clueless about using the A&H desk. Yes the direct outs are the best way of getting a feed.

    As for recording one of my colleagues here favours a computer for recording, another favours a separate box like the Alesis. I reckon the Alesis would be best for us.

    Thanks again.
     
  7. jmcloud

    jmcloud Member

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    The Alesis might save you some money (I'm not sure what they run price wise) but any engineer I've ever met steers so far clear of anything with the Alesis name on it that I wouldn't trust it myself.

    It's decent equipment at very affordable prices, but from everything I've ever been told and heard myself, it's just the way to go if you're looking for high quality.

    Of course this is just IMO, and the industry people I've worked with.
     
  8. loudboy

    loudboy Member

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    The HD24-XR is a different story - the converters compare very favorably to those found in Radar systems, and w/Jim Williams upgrades, they sounded better than the Radar's, even to Radar's CEO. They're acknowledged as being one of the better machines out there, for usages like this.

    When asked about them, vs. a lot of the very high-end stuff he carries, Craig Calistro said - "There's only one problem with them - I don't sell 'em." He's one of the most respected high-end studio dealers in the country.

    You don't see a lot of Presonus gear in pro rooms, either.

    To the original post, it's going to be an easier, more foolproof way to accomplish what you're trying to do.

    Loudboy
     

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