Logic of Berklee Chord Practice Routine

uraniumwilly

Senior Member
Messages
964
This guy (below) does a really nice chord practice routine. The explanation: "Practice playing major, minor, and dominant chords in their inversions can increase your playing speed, harmonic knowledge, and overall guitar technique."

I was planning to just transpose this idea to other keys. Is there anything I'm missing here? Is there any other obvious logic for expanding and practicing chord vocabulary?

Here's the video:

 

Tone Loco

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,418
All he did was move the first exercise up from F to G so your plan of doing it in other keys probably makes sense. Maybe take it around the circle of 5ths? Although it could get sort of unwieldy if you keep the bass notes on the low E like he did once you get up to D or so, depending on your guitar. I suppose you could take the 1st inversion voicings down a 6th in strategic spots. Or just use the voicings with bass notes on the A string as needed.
 

Oneofthe

Member
Messages
254
I used the Berklee Jazz Chord Book to do something like this while remaining in C, can't watch the video so I hope this is what you are referring to:

Berklee%20Jazz%20Chord%20Seventh%20and%20Ninth-page-001_zpseymax2bh.jpg


I have a few of these I created from the book with 9th Chords as well, and then just doing progressions. They are moveable shapes, so learn Berklee Jazz Chord book and you got quite a chord vocabulary.
 

Oneofthe

Member
Messages
254
Oh, and the logic for me of doing this is my mentor suggested I do this and he went to Berklee in the early Seventies before people like Leavitt. For me the logic of doing this is hearing the chord qualities, building my chord vocabulary, learning what a Jazz chord has to offer in terms of tension, release and other tonal qualities. For me it is a hearing thing. Like I told someone else on here, I uploaded stuff like this onto a Facebook group page along with the triads and their inversions. If you want it, go here and join:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/17478193437/
 

Oneofthe

Member
Messages
254
Well, I don't know why anyone is making an issue of calling these chords Jazz chords; they are chords popularly used in Jazz, that's all I know. Here's the book:




And it's not hard, I don't use scales or theory but as I have been taught guitar

1. Reading music
2. Intervals
3. Chords (this is where this fits in)
4. Ear Training
5. Heart

So, it's simple. Don't be intimidated.
 

Oneofthe

Member
Messages
254
Oh as aside good music isn't necessarily hard, hard music isn't necessarily good. Music is not Rocket Science, and Rocket Science certainly is not music. Creativity isn't a sport or banking or a form of math. Creativity is Magic Supernatural like the Santana IV CD which has a secret CD in it which creates some pretty occult stuff. (look for it, it's the on the song Choo Choo you have to skip ahead to the next song at the right point)

Cheers!
 

guitarjazz

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
25,236
Well, I don't know why anyone is making an issue of calling these chords Jazz chords; they are chords popularly used in Jazz, that's all I know. Here's the book:




And it's not hard, I don't use scales or theory but as I have been taught guitar

1. Reading music
2. Intervals
3. Chords (this is where this fits in)
4. Ear Training
5. Heart

So, it's simple. Don't be intimidated.

There's no issue about the chords cause they don't belong to a style. Do do-re-me belong to a style?
 

frdagaa

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,612
I think it's important to know the fretboard well, up and down. Scales help do this, but for me the "anchors" that I call upon all the time in my playing are the inversions of chords like he is playing in the video. When I solo, I'm much more likely to be playing out of these shapes than out of a full scale. And of course knowing these inversions help your rhythm/accompaniment playing.

So yeah, work on the stuff like he's showing.

You can go through all the keys, but it'd also be important to learn the second and 3rd inversions which are not on this video.
 

willyboy

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,648
Oh, and the logic for me of doing this is my mentor suggested I do this and he went to Berklee in the early Seventies before people like Leavitt.

Just to clear this up but Leavitt was at Berklee from 1965-1990.
 

Oneofthe

Member
Messages
254
Just to clear this up but Leavitt was at Berklee from 1965-1990.

Thank you friend for clearing that up, but my understanding from mentor, I'm straight but who I love, is he was faculty but not above that whatever that is called. I'm not making stuff up one here, I'm totally honest. Let me look it up right now but I think he became chair in the eighties. Let me look that up right, I'm thoroughly an honest man. Let me look it up right now:

https://www.berklee.edu/berklee-today/spring-2014/celebrating-berklees-faculty-pioneers

You are correct friend he was there, I was under the impression he was there late seventies. Remember, my friend went there early seventies and he started 65'. So, maybe the time he was there he really did not have influence as he did later on. I believe my friend, he has been the greatest force in my life these last six months. And Honestly, I even honor him on my guitar with a sticker to him.

I've heard things about Leavitt from him, I've heard bad things. I approve and agree what he says seeing his method. I won't write it here because I do not want to anger people. But he's told me things about him and I do not approve of him and the direction he started taking Berklee in the late Seventies and Eighties.

If we can discuss this nicely than ask. But when I think of William Leavitt I think of St. Vincent and for me that is not good.
 

willyboy

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,648
Leavitt was there in the early stages and quite early on he was more than just delivering guitar lessons. If you look at his method books the publishing dates are very early. Example is the Melodic Rhythms for Guitar book, which I use with my students, was first published in 1969 which means these materials he wrote were being used previous to this I'd guess. Leavitt had a huge influence on shaping that program pretty much all along whether he was head of that department or not.

I don't particularly care for whatever the gossip was regarding WL. I have colleagues that studied with him as well. I'm not particularly interested in discussing that thanks
 

Oneofthe

Member
Messages
254
Leavitt was there in the early stages and quite early on he was more than just delivering guitar lessons. If you look at his method books the publishing dates are very early. Example is the Melodic Rhythms for Guitar book, which I use with my students, was first published in 1969 which means these materials he wrote were being used previous to this I'd guess. Leavitt had a huge influence on shaping that program pretty much all along whether he was head of that department or not.

I don't particularly care for whatever the gossip was regarding WL. I have colleagues that studied with him as well. I'm not particularly interested in discussing that thanks

Let's discuss this nicely, please friend I love you as a musician brother. Believe it or not I asked him and he is class of 71' with Leavitt being there in 65, I believe him. I know having gone to an Ivy (I can show my diploma) that it takes time to be in power as a chair. So, knowing me as a student and not being conscious of my chairs he started to effect the department in the late seventies.

Now, what I hear you saying as a spiritual brother is that you have been hoodwinked. Not by me but by Leavitt. Please, I say this and I love you know music is Supernatural, Magical and the real Berklee of fame encouraged that not tried to destroy that like Leavitt. But please, go down that path, teach it to your students there is little wrong of that. But as for me I respect my mentor and not Leavitt at all, knowing his book is called, "Modern Method," I like the old method.
 

willyboy

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,648
Hoodwinked???? Ok. I have no idea what you are talking about. I thought I was talking about this nicely???? Whatever you and your mentor have discussed can stay between you. I have zero interest in whatever you are alluding to regarding whatever WL supposedly did. I use some of his materials that I find useful, and that's where it ends. I don't put the guy on a pedestal if this is what you think. Carry on brother.
 




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