Looking for acoustics/treatment advice

Cj2218

Member
Messages
8
I'm curious to hear what those with acoustic treatment experience might consider doing in a smaller room like this. I'm looking to set up this basement mainly as a guitar tracking area with my helix and monitors.

Room size: 9'x11' with 7' ceilings.
The hallway to the right of the staircase is connected and open to the main room in the first picture. It is about 13' long.

any insight is appreciated!
 

Attachments

  • 1.JPG
    1.JPG
    176 KB · Views: 37
  • 2.JPG
    2.JPG
    111.7 KB · Views: 38

RLD

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
8,795
Helix is designed to record direct tones...you mean to use Helix and mic a cab?
Anyway, I'm a firm believer in traps for small rooms.
I made them pretty cheaply using these plans and they worked wonders for my small studio which I set up for mixing, not tracking.

 

tribedescribe

Member
Messages
790
Are you doing final mixing or just tracking? If you mixing then full treatment will be needed.

There is a lot to learn about the stuff and the link below has lots of great info.

https://ethanwiner.com/acoustics.html

typically for a control room you would want 4 bass traps for the corners, 2 traps for the mixing position side reflections and a trap for the ceiling cloud. I also use IK's arc 3 to correct any other issues with my room while mixing. Below is a nice pic of a control room and treatment.

https://www.gikacoustics.com/produc...GGxf0PsztVM36JVuXrK-zrb0eGMQFfTxoCG_QQAvD_BwE
 

sleshnyc

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,846
Before you do anything invest in a measurement mic and do some room analysis and see where the problems are. You can eliminate many of the if you are able to put your setup about a third of the way into the room. If not you have more issues. You can build broadband absorption very inexpensively yourself with 2x4 batts and furring strips. Ideally build them double thick then hang them 2 inches from the wall. Start by putting them at reflection points. Side and rear walls and overhead. Don’t build bass traps until you’ve established you have a bass problem. Just get rid of reflections to start.
 

Forever_Noob

Member
Messages
68
Before you do anything invest in a measurement mic and do some room analysis and see where the problems are. You can eliminate many of the if you are able to put your setup about a third of the way into the room. If not you have more issues. You can build broadband absorption very inexpensively yourself with 2x4 batts and furring strips. Ideally build them double thick then hang them 2 inches from the wall. Start by putting them at reflection points. Side and rear walls and overhead. Don’t build bass traps until you’ve established you have a bass problem. Just get rid of reflections to start.
Question - can I run these measurements with an SM57? I am thinking of doing some basic treatments but it’s one of those things where I need to actually track and mix more before justifying spending $$$ on things.
 
Messages
3,353
Question - can I run these measurements with an SM57? I am thinking of doing some basic treatments but it’s one of those things where I need to actually track and mix more before justifying spending $$$ on things.
No. You need an omni mic. I think you can get a passable measurement mic for around $30 or so.
 

sleshnyc

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,846
Question - can I run these measurements with an SM57? I am thinking of doing some basic treatments but it’s one of those things where I need to actually track and mix more before justifying spending $$$ on things.
no. you need a measurement mic. they're not that expense but without it it's not worth anything. You can resell it
 
Messages
3,353
Pretty much any decent omni should work for low frequency measurements…trust me, your rooms response will be way bumpier than the mic. But you’ll want a measurement mic for the higher frequency analysis.
 

Cj2218

Member
Messages
8
Thanks for the replies.

Alternatively, I could use this guest room instead of the basement. I will be swapping that bed for a couch.

Would that nook where the dresser is be an acoustic nightmare to have my desk set up in? (It is 7' wide). I'm just thinking through set-ups at this point before I sink money and time into a room.
 

Attachments

  • IMG_1739.jpg
    IMG_1739.jpg
    183.3 KB · Views: 14
  • IMG_1738.jpg
    IMG_1738.jpg
    180.9 KB · Views: 14
  • IMG_1741.jpg
    IMG_1741.jpg
    147.8 KB · Views: 14

Billinder33

Member
Messages
2,376
I like the basement. Personally I would build a partition wall and door to close off the office from the stairwell area. Then you can deal with treating the office.

Without that, you will have a very unbalanced room regardless of treatment, with low end accumulating on the right next to your wall, and an echo'ing cavern of very late reflections and laundry noise (and associated dust) to your left.

I know that may be outside your budget, but I think you'll be much happier with the results in the end. And much easier to do before you get your studio all set up.
 

kcprogguitar

Member
Messages
2,831
Thanks for the replies.

Alternatively, I could use this guest room instead of the basement. I will be swapping that bed for a couch.

Would that nook where the dresser is be an acoustic nightmare to have my desk set up in? (It is 7' wide). I'm just thinking through set-ups at this point before I sink money and time into a room.

Just a thought, from someone who has had a series of home studios in the basement. The second choice has natural light. I'd kill for some natural light when working. I'll be getting some when we move in the next three months, I expect a slightly different mindset when being able to look outside.
 




Trending Topics

Top Bottom