Looking for new P-style pickup: Passive, deep and LOUD

Discussion in 'Bass Area; The Bottom Line' started by JM_of_BOFP, Sep 24, 2008.

  1. JM_of_BOFP

    JM_of_BOFP Member

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    Any ideas? I have an old yamaha rbx (circa 1990) that I've played forever. I am planning on getting a new electric (probable T-bird or deep-sounding equivalent) soon, but want to upgrade the yamaha as well. Anyone have any suggestions for a pickup that will put out a thick, and I mean THICK, strong and loud low end?

    Anyone know anything about those new Lace p-style pickups? so hard to tell how they are from reading the ads on the site, ya know?

    Thanks folks.
     
  2. testing1two

    testing1two Gold Supporting Member

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    Lindy Fralin or Sadowsky if you want a passive pickup that does everything right. Seymour Duncan Quarter Pounder if you want additional output and a more aggressive tone. EMG if you want thundering low end with great clarity and can live with a battery in your bass.
     
  3. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    +1 on the fralin. it's big, like a quarter pounder without the midrange boost, even though it's not overwound or otherwise unusually built.

    put a 500k linear volume and a 500k audio tone in there and it will sound huge while still sounding "right".
     
  4. JM_of_BOFP

    JM_of_BOFP Member

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    Fralin may just be the right answer. Thanks to you both. Should help keep my old friend in the "usable" pile.

    good notion with the 500k pot. what's the difference between it and the 250k that's already in there? Don't understand it that much.
     
  5. the(sims)

    the(sims) Member

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    I put some Dimarzio split P's in a Hamer bass to replace some worn out Bill Lawrence pu's. Those Split P's bring the thunder!
     
  6. zydeco papa

    zydeco papa Member

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    Man, TI jazz flats and the G&L MFD P pickup make for really big and thick old school tone that can bark or bite when called for.
     
  7. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    the 250k's trim off a bit of high end and volume even when they're all the way up. 500k's let the whole sound through, like going from a muffler to straight pipes. the linear volume will still evenly sweep from 0-10, and the tone will let you go from slicing-bright to fully dark, without any active stuff.
     
  8. ponticat

    ponticat Member

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    If you really want straight pipes, wire your pickup directly to the jack; that's what I do.
     
  9. zydeco papa

    zydeco papa Member

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    That's more like open headers!
     
  10. Thomme

    Thomme Member

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    My vote's on the Dimarzio.... I can't remember what it's called, but it's actually two humbuckers with blades that replace your 1 humbucker. It has a HUGE sound to it. And from what I understand, the Lindy Frailin's will give you some good boom. EMG Actives, I had a set for a while, also do a great job of giving you extra push, but it also gives you a ton of high end, too, but with a good preamp, you can mold your tone. I actually used a set of the Duncan hot p-bass pickups in my epiphone bass to thicken it up. The bass is all maple, so it's tone is through the roof, and the duncan hots did well to bring out the bottom end of that bass.
     
  11. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    yeah, with the gas pedal stuck to the floor. no thanks!
     
  12. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    that's the goofily named "split P". it does indeed sound huge, more like a soapbar humbucker than a p-bass. i've found that the trick is to wire it in parallel, rather than the normal series. this gives it the treble clarity it's slightly lacking, while not really reducing the output any.
     
  13. bostonwal

    bostonwal Member

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    I'd be curious about an SD Antiquity and a Lollar. However, a JM Rolph is probably the way to go (I'd go with a 1969 myself). I can't believe how expensive P bass pickups are from the 70s, let alone the late 60s.
     
  14. JM_of_BOFP

    JM_of_BOFP Member

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    That's all great info! thanks everyone.
    Looking around for stacked 500k volume and tone pots.
    Also thinking of replacing the jazz pickup with an old kramer humbucker I have (the double-jazz style used in those old duke and pioneer basses. should give some interesting tonal options between that and the fralin).
     
  15. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    jazz pickup? you never said anything about a jazz pickup!

    i like the dimarzio ultra-jazz for that, as it hangs with the p-bass pickup power-wise, and doesn't hum like a single coil will.
     
  16. JM_of_BOFP

    JM_of_BOFP Member

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    yeah, the kramer pickup (actually a dimarzio humbucker) was always the intent, but I really want something to bring the depth for the P-position. As much as the bass can get depth, anyway.

    It's funny - the most expensive part about re-doing the pots is the knobs! nobody seems to make plastic stacked knobs.
     
  17. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    a lot of times, having that big humbucker right next to a p-bass pickup makes for "too much pickup", making things a bit indistinct. that's probably why this combo isn't especially popular.

    personally, i agree with leo fender, a bass should have 2 coils (p-bass, j-bass, stingray).
     

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