Looking for Rickenbacker tone without buying a Rickenbacker

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by straightblues, Feb 3, 2016.

  1. Wayne Alexander

    Wayne Alexander Supporting Member

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    Try a 660-12. The neck width is 1.75 inches, and though my "ideal" neck is a 59 Les Paul profile, I'm fine with that neck. Try one. The 360 and 330 and 620 all have thin, narrow necks. The 660 does not. It might work for you.
     
  2. cam.man67

    cam.man67 Member

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  3. straightblues

    straightblues Member

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    I played it at NAMM. It is really cool and it does sound like a Rick 12 string in the one setting. I will use similar wiring on anything I put together.
     
  4. straightblues

    straightblues Member

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    One thing I am seriously considering is just using a Danolectro that I have and putting some Rick pickups into. That Brownsville has a similar build as the Danolectro.
     
  5. django49

    django49 Member

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    Some of the Hamer 12 strings offer (IMO) the jangly sound of the Ric, with fewer negatives.
     
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  6. VicAjax

    VicAjax Male Supermodel

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    Here's the trick with Ric pups: they are voiced to work in all-maple guitars. Maple is a very bright wood, and that combined with the laminated fingerboard creates an acoustic tone with a lot of treble energy. The Toasters and Hi-Gains tame a bit of that into the classic jangle (especially with help from a compressor)...but put in most other guitars they sound exceedingly dark.
     
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  7. fiveightandten

    fiveightandten Member

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    Have you tried a 650? It sounds like the type of neck you're looking for. Get one of those, and have the neck stripped and refretted with taller frets. Gibson playability with Ric tone and looks.
     
  8. TheBuffalo

    TheBuffalo Member

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  9. Eagle1

    Eagle1 Member

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    Tele with broken pickups?
     
  10. Mpcoluv

    Mpcoluv Supporting Member

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    Try a maple bodied parts caster that is chambered. The Ric formula can't be too mysterious.
    Another thought is that some of the Ric models had a larger neck. Get one of those and have a luthier strip the fingerboard and refret to your tastes
     
  11. direwolf

    direwolf Supporting Member

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    Danocaster T sounds like REM.
     
  12. itstooloudMike

    itstooloudMike Member

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    I have a 2005 360/6 Ric, and the neck is easily as big as any Strat I've ever owned. It actually feels a lot like a 60s Les Paul neck in the first few frets. I do think the string spacing might be slightly narrower, but it doesn't affect my playing at all. I switch back and forth between Gibsons, Fenders, PRS, and my Ric all the time with no trouble. I don't even notice the lacquered fretboard. Low action, plays great, easy string bending. I use 10s on mine, and it holds tune extremely well.

    Regarding a surrogate for the Ric tone, I don't believe you will get there without a maple body, Ric pickups, and a bridge similar to a Ric. The pickups are important, but I can hear the Ric sound even when playing my 360 unplugged. It's quite evident that much of the Ric sound comes from the design of the guitar itself, without respect to the electronics. They just voice the pickups to accurately convey what the guitar is doing. It's a very unique sound formula. Personally, I'd say suck it up and adjust to playing a real Ric. It's not that difficult. And it's smarter from a financial standpoint. The prices of used Rics are very stable, so you can buy a used Ric at a reasonable price, and later sell it for most of what you paid. Very little "cost of ownership". However, you can spend lots of money building a Ric-O-Partscaster, and get zilch for it if you need to sell it. Really a crap shoot, and potential waste of money. If you really want the Ric sound, just get a Ric.
     
  13. jdogric12

    jdogric12 Supporting Member

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    A Rick 650 will be very dark in comparison... you probably want a 660 if you want "THE Rick tone," but with a nice wide neck, like Kramer's luxury highway lanes lol
     
  14. Kestrel

    Kestrel Member

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    Years ago, I was in a similar situation. For financial reasons I wanted a relatively affordable guitar that could sound like a Ric, without being actually being a Ric. I wasn't really after the 12-string tones of The Byrds or The Beatles. I was after the tones of The Jam's Paul Weller, The Smith's Johnny Marr, and REM's Peter Buck.
    Nothing out there really did it for me, so in the end I bought a Rickenbacker 330 and could not have been happier. It did feel and play a bit different to what I was used to, but I adjusted to it rather easily. My advice to anyone looking for that Rickenbacker sound is to just get a Rickenbacker.
     
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  15. dirk_benedict

    dirk_benedict Supporting Member

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    There's a reason why they've basically made the same handful of models of guitars for decades now.

    The feel adjustment thing is definitely real...but worth it if you can get over the hump.
     
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  16. strumnhum

    strumnhum Member

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    Reverend is making guitars with their own "Revtron" pups, and with the bass contour feature, might get you there. I haven't had the chance to try one with the Revtrons, but have been impressed with the Reverends I have played. If you have a dealer where you could try one, might do the trick. http://www.reverendguitars.com/instrument/tricky-gomez/
     
  17. nmiller

    nmiller Drowning in lap steels Gold Supporting Member

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    Yup. Rickenbacker necks have never been particularly slim or narrow, and I've always been puzzled by people claiming that they're hard to play. Apparently, 50 million Elvis fans can be wrong.
     
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  18. GrungeMan

    GrungeMan Supporting Member

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    I'm one for putting other pups in Tele's but, they don't sound like a Rickenbacker Gretsch or what-ever because the rest of the guitar is not a Rickenbacker Gretsch or what-ever...still it does sound good and unique...
     
  19. jubal81

    jubal81 Member

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    Id recommend getting a great compressor (cali76 or Suhr koji) and a 10-band eq. You can dial it in just how you want it in a few hours, spend less money, have pedals to use elsewhere and play whatever guitar you find comfortable.
     
  20. BKL71

    BKL71 Member

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    The truth is, you can't get a Rickenbacker tone without a Rickenbacker guitar. Ricks are completely different instruments, from the way they're constructed and the electronics and hardware used on them, most of which are made in-house. Even though there are plenty of Gibson and Fender knockoffs that sound like the real thing, you will have no such luck with a Rickenbacker. My advice is to save your money and get the real thing. You won't be sorry.
     
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