loose tube sockets remedy

Discussion in 'Amps/Cabs Tech Corner: Amplifier, Cab & Speakers' started by Rick1114, Mar 28, 2015.

  1. Rick1114

    Rick1114 Member

    Messages:
    551
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    I have an old bucket of bolts 1957 GA-5 that's got some really loose tube sockets, Not the pins, which I was able to re-tension, but the sockets themselves are loose, and the tube has a lot of play, causing audible vibrations when I play a LP through the amp.

    Is there any fix for this? The 5Y3 is prob the culprit but the 6V6 is also loose. The 12AX7 seems okay because it has the spring cover.

    Any advice for this particular issue?

    Thanks in advance


    Rick
     
  2. Winnie Thomas

    Winnie Thomas Member

    Messages:
    503
    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2006
    Location:
    Cochise, Arizona
    If you mean that the socket is loose in the metal bracket, flow some crazy glue around the edge where the metal meets the socket.
     
  3. Rick1114

    Rick1114 Member

    Messages:
    551
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    Yes that's correct...they are quite loose. I'll try the crazy glue, however, I am worried it may be too thin.

    Thanks,

    Rick
     
  4. schmidlin

    schmidlin Member

    Messages:
    5,267
    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2008
    Location:
    Sunny Ohio
    Crazy glue (CA) was my first thought as well. It won't be too thin, or just re-apply. They make different viscosities, too. Be careful: the thin stuff like to wick into all kinds of nooks and crannies.
     
  5. Ronsonic

    Ronsonic Member

    Messages:
    3,313
    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Location:
    Sunny Tampa, Florida
    A lot of old Gibsons had the tube sockets mounted on rubber bushings to eliminate vibrations. Those little rings are rotting away while I type. Take a close look and see if that isn't what's happened to yours.
     
  6. Amp-Rat

    Amp-Rat Member

    Messages:
    11
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2012
    Location:
    Connecticut
    A quick fix is to dab a bit of RTV on the gap from socket to chassis. Once it cures it will still have some 'play' to dampen vibrations.
     
  7. Blue Strat

    Blue Strat Member

    Messages:
    30,029
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Location:
    Sterling, VA (not far from Washington DC)
    RTV would be better, buy why not replace the sockets?
     
  8. swiveltung

    swiveltung Member

    Messages:
    14,567
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Location:
    PNW
    Soooo... many sockets are loose in the plate... even brand new ones... is this a problem? I've never thought of it as a problem... but I suppose it could cause some issues?
    I'd probably use silicone sealant... most of those are good to ..400 degrees?
     
  9. mark norwine

    mark norwine Member

    Messages:
    16,133
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2005
    Location:
    NJ...GSP135
    replace the socket(s).

    Glue...sealant....these are not the right way to go.
     
  10. Rick1114

    Rick1114 Member

    Messages:
    551
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    I should replace them, but it will be a while before I have time to get into that bee's nest...maybe just try RTV in the meantime.
     
  11. kevmin

    kevmin Supporting Member

    Messages:
    1,347
    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2002
    Location:
    Yakima, WA
    If I remember correctly, the tube sockets on that particular amp are pop riveted in. If that is correct, then you can try all that silicone advice for a quick easy fix first, but the proper fix is to drill out the rivets and replace them with the right size bolts with locking nuts. Then she will be good as new and still have the original sockets!

    There should be no need for vibration dampening with good non-microphonic tubes. A solidly mounted socket is what you want.
     
  12. Structo

    Structo Member

    Messages:
    9,574
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2007
    Location:
    Oregon
    Does it still have the original filter caps?
     
  13. Rick1114

    Rick1114 Member

    Messages:
    551
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    yes, I changed caps, new PIO Capacitors, coupling caps and plate resistors. Still have the original speaker. The amp seems to sounds fine with a Strat, but plug in a LP with a lot of low frequency vibration and things start buzzing.

    Either way, I think the sockets need to be replaced in this thing. After a close examination, there is a lot of play between the metal contacts and the plastic part of he socket. To make matters worse, as the poster said above, the sockets are riveted in. Looks like this amp will be going over to the workbench for a while...

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Ronsonic

    Ronsonic Member

    Messages:
    3,313
    Joined:
    May 14, 2006
    Location:
    Sunny Tampa, Florida
    It doesn't much matter if the contacts are moving in the socket, what matters is that they grip the pins well. It's downright normal that there's play in the socket. These aren't precision devices and they need the flexibility to move around a bit.

    And yes those sockets were once mounted on small rubber bushings. Replacing with 4-40 screws and nuts with or without an O-ring for isolation would be most solid.

    That said, I think you're chasing a non-problem.
     
  15. Rick1114

    Rick1114 Member

    Messages:
    551
    Joined:
    Jun 20, 2007
    Your prob right. Like I said, its not an issue with a strat. Plug in an LP, not only do you sense physical rattling from the tubes, but some buzzing coming through the speaker. Might just do the glue for now and a new speaker down the line, and check all the connections. I've found bad ones in there before. Prob is its so old (1957) and its not built like a fender!

    Thanks Rick
     

Share This Page