Loud drummer, best cheap amps

Thegearman#7

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9
Yes, I've been a massive gear hound over the yrs. But lately I've just been recording w minimal gear. At the moment I'm doing a few sessions maybe live gigs w a loud rock drummer he can't come down in volume I've tried. I'm not gonna get a Marshall and 4x12 I'm usually a blues and jazz guy. Right now no PA so can't mic it. Saw that Duncan 175 or 200 pedal that acts like a head considering that. Just seeing what u guys use lately that's got some volume I know many of us have been going lower watt and I totally get that. Much thanks in advance
 
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roverdog

Member
Messages
596
I use a 5 watt Champ most of the time at the jam I go to and it is not miked. Sometime drummers say I am too loud!
 

DavidA19

Member
Messages
129
How cheap are you looking for? First thing that comes to mind given your need for volume and preference for blues and jazz tones is a used Hot Rod Deville. That probably goes for around $500. Not sure if that is what you were thinking budget wise.
 

YerKidd

Member
Messages
1,154
I'm teetering on the verge of closing a deal on a 70s Moog Lab Series combo. Solely for the purpose of having a loud, cheap amp to drag around with my original band. It may be heavy, but I don't care.

Our drummer is pretty loud, and my Deluxe Reverb has been struggling to keep up. The Lab Series has all the headroom I need, and it's only 250 (they usually run twice that, but the seller has it 'moving price').

As far as recommending something new and suitable, a Boss Katana 100 combo should keep up just fine with any drummer alive. If you need to go tube, get a used Hot Rod DeVille or Peavey Classic 50.
 

Yooper

Member
Messages
1,052
I'd turn down the volume to where the drummer can't hear you. See what he does then. If he's any good he can control his dynamics.
Or a used 100 watt Mustang 3 v2 or Katana should do the trick for a couple hundred bucks.
If he needs to drown those out, he's not a good drummer.
 

Simon

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,682
Great drummers have dynamics. Playing with a drummer that has one volume can get old fast.
I know ham handed drummers used to use dead wringers, or maybe ask him to use really light sticks.

Protect your hearing! Maybe IEM's are an option as well?
You could have as much guitar in your ears as you want.

Volume wars are a green horn thing.
 
Messages
1,553
Drummers overcome the lack of chops, inability to paradiddle like Max Roach or triplet like Bonham, with volume.

My experience with drummers in small rehearsal spaces is having to beg to mellow out, over, and over, and over again.
 
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Thegearman#7

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9
Funny w chops and volume I've played w some mofo jazz drummers that really don't like to play at lower volume and that's a deal killer for me w jazz especially I should be able to play at many levels and have him listen I lost a few gigs yrs ago over that. One guy in particular amazing I'm like dude brushes all night ok? And he did it sounded amazing..but yeah I'm older it's frustrating I've saved yrs of my hearing many moons ago but my ears ring after jamming w him even said hey man you're about 3x louder then you where as a kid he says no but my ears are ringing and it's no fun ..can't tell him anything
 

makerdp

Member
Messages
629
Something in the Fender Mustang line or a Boss Katana 100-watter. I own a Fender GTX 100 and I often use it in mid-sized venues without a mic and without going much over 1:00 on the volume knob. Great sounding amp and very versatile. You'll love the Super Reverb model on the GTX!

I'm not going to join the "tell your drummer to turn down" conversation except to say, yeah sometimes you DO need a louder amp to keep up.
 

Stokely

Member
Messages
1,928
I remember four specific crash cymbals--from a loud drummer--that made my eardrums distort at a gig about seven years ago. I bought in-ears the very next day, though fortunately that was the last loud drummer we have had in the band. I regret years of being in rooms with loud drummers going back to the 80s--practice being worse than gigs--I'll never get back whatever amount of hearing I've lost.

So in-ears, or earplugs at least, might protect your hearing though it opens up more issues to overcome.

I'm also a big believer in working through songs at practice at low volume while you work out the song structure, breaks, endings etc. Save your ears for a final full-volume run once you have it down. I can't count the number of bands I've been in that go all-out from the start and you have to start yelling to stop when everyone missing the damn bridge etc.

If he lacks the ability or won't consider changing his playing style, the light sticks is something to try. We had a very low volume corporate gig last month where we bought our drummer a couple sets of Hot Rods and they sounded great.

If nothing at all changes...you'll need not only a loud enough amp but one that has headroom to sound like you want. I'm not a guitarist really but the few times I've cranked various small amps, yeah they get loud--but they don't necessarily sound clean or good (of course some amps sound the best cranked, if you want crunch especially!)
 
Messages
1,553
In 1980, a psycho loud drummer forced me to trade my '68 Small Box Plexi in for a Sound City 100 and I paid a hefty cash difference.

Worst trade I ever made but I didn't know that at the time.
 

RippedJeans

Member
Messages
239
A 10 watt amp is about equal volume to acoustic drums.

Volume is also about moving air. A 12 inch speaker moves more air than an 8 inch speaker.

I use the 50 watt Boss Katana with 12 inch speaker. No problem competing with drums. It has lower power settings - 25 watt and 0.5 watt also. Solid state, affordable, portable. Good gigging amp.
 

DunedinDragon

Member
Messages
1,377
Your drummer is the reason drum plugins are so popular in the recording studio and are beginning to get more popular at live events. His inability to control his dynamics are quickly making him obsolete.
 

mikebat

Member
Messages
12,073
So, you are blues/jazz guy, but playing with a loud rock drummer.

  • What type of music are you playing?
  • What is the core of your sound, a pedal, an amp?
  • What type of venue are you going to play, or is it all recording?

If you are starting from zero, playing rock with a loud rock drummer, no 5 watt amp with a 8 inch speaker will do if you intend to have any dynamics at all. You will need a 50 watt amp and 2 x 12 inch speakers. You can choose how modern you want to go, Marshall, to Peavey 5150. That is just the bone stock answer for a reason, because it works.

If you are starting from scratch and playing blues with a loud rock drummer, you may need something like a Fender Super Reverb, or maybe a Peavey Classic 50.

If you already have a preamp pedal, modeler etc... then a FRFR112 like the Headrush will be more than enough power, and it is $300 brand new.

If you are recording, it doesn't matter at all. Use what you have if you like it.
 

DunedinDragon

Member
Messages
1,377
Maybe this is the problem with being a gear hound. No gear will ever be able to fully compensate for a lack of professionalism. Some problems are only fixed by replacing the problem with someone that's NOT a problem.
 

Thegearman#7

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9
Hi Jim,
Been curious on that amp, have tried the block pedals very cool, might check the Aviator
 




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