Love bluesy players, love bluesy solos, love good blues live....

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by cantstoplt021, Jan 24, 2015.

  1. cantstoplt021

    cantstoplt021 Member

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    ... but don't really like blues albums. I'm not sure if anyone else is like me on here, but I really like blues without liking blues per se. Pretty much all of my favorite electric players come from a strong blues background (Mayer, Derek Trucks, Hendrix, etc.), I love when these guys play a blues and I love to hear great blues live. I love to hear bluesy solos during non blues songs, etc. But I just don't like listening to a lot of traditional blues. I can listen to it live all day long, but when it comes to listening to records it's a rare occasion that I'll put on a blues record. I definitely haven't explored the genre enough to write it all off, but I'm just wondering why it is this way. It might have something to do with me loving great songwriting and I don't hear it a lot in traditional blues (again I haven't explored enough). Maybe it's cause I'm young and the blues heydey was about 30-40 years before I was born? Not quite sure. Anyone else like me?
     
  2. specialidiot

    specialidiot most likely to seceede Supporting Member

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    You sound like my wife..... she says she can't stand the blues but loves LZ, Stones, and Hendrix.

    The stuff she likes from them are the "blusiest" that they do, and she gets mad when I point it out.
     
  3. cantstoplt021

    cantstoplt021 Member

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    Yeah its weird I even really like when they do songs like Red House, Sky is Crying, Out of my mind, but listening to live at the regal or Albert king doesn't do much for me
     
  4. JonRock

    JonRock Member

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    Im pretty much the same way for the last few years. I can hardly listen to straight blues anymore. I used to listen to it more.

    of course 95% of the great rock players I grew up with are "blues based"....whatever that means.

    A few of my fave players:

    Page
    Hendrix
    Halen
    Malmsteen
    Sykes
    Gary Moore
    Jake E Lee

    Those are probably my fave 7. With the exception of Yngwie, all would be called "blues based" AFAIK. But EVH, John Sykes, and Jake dont really make you think of Muddy Waters or Robert Johnson. I think rock has evolved enough so that it doesnt really have to have such a strong link to the blues...even though the string bending and vibrato will always give it that blues feel.

    I might listen to SRV maybe 2x per year. If I listen to Clapton at all it might be thru Cream or Blind Faith or Layla...it wont be "Further up the Road"


    Take a guy like Philip Sayce. Obviously a great player...seems like a great guy, but I can only take that style in small doses. After maybe 2 songs it gets very repetitive.


    I ran across Melvin Taylor a few months back. I had never really heard him even though I recognized his pic from guitar mags back around 88-90. Just insane blues player. Killer tone and killer chops. I started thinking...."why isnt this guy super famous?" Then I realized its because its just blues. I sort of realized then I wasnt a super blues fan even though I "love the blues." I love steak too but only eat it a few times per year

    A blues player I do really like is Dave Osti. He blurs the line between blues and rock and IMO he is over more on the rock side.




    This is a great example. Bluesy, but not blues.



    If I could put together a dream band etc it would probably sound like one of these:





     
  5. Kingsley Fats

    Kingsley Fats Member

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    Apart from Melvin Taylor & SRV none of the mentioned players are blues. They are rock guys who dabble in playing "blues based" .
    Melivn Taylor & to some extent SRV also blur the lines between blues & blues-rock.
    Maybe what you don't like a lot is blues-rock. Tt is possible that you haven't really heard any blues to form an opinion one way or the other.
     
  6. ZeyerGTR

    ZeyerGTR Supporting Member

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    I listen to a lot of blues, but it is a genre that benefits from being heard live. There's a lot of back-and-forth with the audience. It's that direct connection and energy that good blues uses more than some other genres. I forget who said it, but "You don't play the instrument, you play the audience." I think that's very true for blues. It can be hard to capture on an album. There's also the "fun" factor - drinking, being with friends, being "out."

    That said, it's case-by-case basis, even with the same artist. I listen to a lot of BB King, but 90% of the time it's a live album. Buddy Guy I certainly go both ways - I probably listen to more studio records from him, but he's got some great live stuff. I really liked some live clips I saw of Phillip Sayce on youtube, but when I got an album of his I was a little disappointed. Same tunes, but lacked the energy. Some guys like Lightnin' Hopkins do everything with a live feel even if it was released as a studio cut - they paid him $100, he'd show up on whatever day, do a take and then leave. :)

    I doubt it, that's true for the vast majority of us.
     
  7. JonRock

    JonRock Member

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    (assuming that is directed towards me)

    Ive listened to more blues than 20 cotton pickers growing up in the depression.

    The players I listed were clearly called my "fave" players....they were never called blues players. Melvin and Stevie, to my ears, are blues players....they arent really on my playlists since I cant listen to much blues anymore.

    For straight blues I like Muddy, Albert K, Albert C, Johnny Winter. I love the album "Hard Again." I also essentially like most open tuned rural blues stuff.

    If I did listen to more blues id listen to Melvin Taylor because he sounds incredible

    My "fave" lately which I only recently heard is Skip James
     
  8. gmann

    gmann Member

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    The best Blues is usually played live. This style of music lends itself to that environment quite easily. It benefits fm the give and take you get with an audience.
     
  9. Scott Miller

    Scott Miller Member

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    I think that

    She don't love me
    And I don't even care

    Is pretty good song writing.
     
  10. GulfportBound

    GulfportBound Member

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    Don't forget that there's more than one way to hear or play the blues.











     
  11. kidmo

    kidmo Member

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    Or:
    'Cause if my baby don't love me no more,
    I know her sister will!

    Face it dude, the blues just ain't that into you...:thud
     
  12. Average Joe

    Average Joe Member

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    I know what you mean. I can listen to one or two blues tunes, then I need a change of pace. I used to be a card carrying member of the blues police about 20 years back and maybe I'm just burned out on it, but there is also a sameness to a lot of guitar blues. I like blues, but there is such a thing as too much of a good thing
     
  13. S.W.Erdnase

    S.W.Erdnase Supporting Member

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    Maybe you guys are going through the male menopause? Try HRT.
     
  14. Crowder

    Crowder Dang Twangler Silver Supporting Member

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    Most blues acts don't seem to put a ton of effort into making great studio records. They spend a week or two playing live in the studio and then go back on the road. Maybe that's why a lot of the records aren't that interesting to hear.
     
  15. dlguitar64

    dlguitar64 Member

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    I can listen to Muddy Waters,Howlin Wolf and Sonny Boy Williamson all day but get burned out pretty quickly listening to to post BB King style blues.
     
  16. GulfportBound

    GulfportBound Member

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    They might do well to revisit the three albums Johnny Winter produced for Muddy Waters in the late 1970s/early 1980s, Hard Again, I'm Ready, and King Bee. Not to mention the two final studio albums Muddy Waters did when Chess was still an active working label, Can't Get No Grindin' and The Muddy Waters Woodstock Album, before he hooked up with Winter. (Ask me to pick and I'd say Can't Get No Grindin' probably qualifies as the great lost Muddy Waters album.)

    Winter, in fact (and Waters himself often went out of his way to talk about it) went out of his way to set things up the way Waters made his classic Chess sides even as they were concentrating on newer material as well as revisiting a few Waters vintages. They went in to make albums, not just product to sell while hitting the road again (which they did prodigiously; I had the good fortune of catching a Muddy Waters show during that period and it was as though the old man had gotten a rebirth. (Not to mention the most financially successful time of his life; all three albums were best sellers and won a small pack of awards in the bargain.)
     
  17. Ravindave_3600

    Ravindave_3600 Member

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    Great blues live is about sweat and grind. Blues recorded, on the other hand, is usually a lot more polite. And polite just doesn't really work for it. Muddy Waters (either on those great 50s sides or the Johnny Winter albums) sounds like he's singing at you, and that makes all the difference.
     
  18. cantstoplt021

    cantstoplt021 Member

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    Well I've been listening to this blues station on spotify for about a half an hour and really digging it. It's been good traditional blues by people like Muddy Waters, Albert Collins, BB, Robert Johnson, Howlin Wolf. Good change from the SRV style blues playing
     
  19. D Rock

    D Rock Member

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    Hendrix - Blues

    My favorite all time album. If you can't get into this, I'd suggest working on your head space a little first.
     
  20. D Rock

    D Rock Member

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