Love for the nome

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by exhaust_49, Sep 7, 2006.

  1. exhaust_49

    exhaust_49 Member

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    I really starting to see a lot of progress with my guitar playing ever since I've fallen in love with my metronome. I used to hate these things but I realized what a valueable tool they are. I'm really starting to sound good. I also realized I'm more of a rythm player than a soloist. Maby I should of been a drummer.....well.....lets not go that far!

    Share your experience/advice with the dreaded nome.
     
  2. IndieHead

    IndieHead Member

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    hi. i m new to the mentronome. any basic lessons on how to practice with it? thanks!
     
  3. NathanC

    NathanC Member

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    When I first started playing, I wanted to break my guitar teahers metronome, but I am thankful now, there is nothing worse than not keeping time.
     
  4. NathanC

    NathanC Member

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    Get it going, play to the beat.
     
  5. tonedaddy

    tonedaddy Member

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    Here's how I practice with a metronome.
    It's almost the exact same ideas/methods I used when learning to play drums.


    - My focus is on playing in rhythm, not building speed.
    - If I play accurately in rhythm with the metronome and play cleanly, speed will come in time.
    - If I go for speed first, I'll rarely find the accurate/clean rhythm I want to achieve.


    First I find some basic chord progression tracks in different styles to play rhythm against.

    I first set the metronome to a slow, easy speed.

    I practice right hand rhythms:
    - strumming exactly on the beat
    - strumming exactly between each beat
    - strumming twice to each beat
    - strumming 3...4...5...6.....etc to each beat
    - mix up strumming combinations to each beat (e.g. start with a measure with twice to each beat, then a measure of 5 to each beat, then a measure of 3 to each beat, etc.)

    I'll try these exercises strumming down only, then up only, then alternating up and down strumming


    Then I practice left hand rhythms:
    - moving to each chord exactly on the beat
    - moving to each chord between each beat
    - moving to chords twice to each beat
    - moving 3...4...5....6...etc to each beat
    - mix up chord movement combinations to each beat (e.g. start with a measure with two chord changes to each beat, then a measure of 4 changes to each beat, then then a measure of 3 to each beat, etc.)

    With the left hand rhythms, instead of moving to a new chord I might just move to a different voicing for each chord with each movement, or maybe a slightly altered chord with each movement.


    Then I practice left and right hand rhythms:
    - combining right hand strumming and left hand movements exactly on the beat
    - then twice to each beat
    - then 3...4...5...6....etc to each beat


    I'll go through these exercises in a blues-style chord progression, then a country-style progression, then a jazz-style, and so on, etc.


    Again, my goals by the time I finish these exercises are:
    - to have always played accurately on/to/against each beat
    - play cleanly.


    Another thing I'll practice is find some marching band drum rhythms (I just remember these from learning drums, but I'm guessing you can either find these on the internet or buy a CD of them).

    I'll get one of these rhythms in my head, kick on the metronome, and start playing a single chord rhythm with my right hand mimicing the rhythm of the snare drummers. During this time, I'll mute all the strings with my left hand so I'm just "scratching out" the sound of the snare drum with my right hand. I'll work out alternating up and down rhythm patterns with my right hand to sound as close as I can to the groove the snare drummers are laying down. After I feel comfortable that I'm playing these rhythms accurately and cleanly, I'll start to mixing in some left hand chords and chord movements along with the muted string scratches to build a progression, but working to never miss the sound/feel of the snare drum with my right hand.


    Also, my goal is to find the "pocket".... the place where those left and right hand rhythms feel right/tight/clean in the rhythm. For examples of finding the pocket, search out funk players/tunes....you'll find some examples here:
    http://thegearpage.net/board/showthread.php?t=167189


    Another technique is to use the metronome with any/all instructional books/DVDs/etc.


    After using a metronome with these kinds of exercises, I'll get someone to test me against a metronome that I can't see.

    - I'll listen to the metronome for 4 measures, then have the person silence the metronome for the remainder of the exercise.
    - At the end of the exercise, I'll have the person either tell me if I finished the exercise in accurately in rhythm with the metronome, or faster or slower.
    - Then I might have the person kick on the metronome randomly during my exercises so I can see how well I'm keeping in rhythm/time.
    - Obviously the goal is to develop a rhythmic timing/memory that stays in time over the entire exercise/song... neither speeding up nor slowing down. Some might say that this is the drummer's job, but I believe a good rhythm guitarist can keep a rhythm section (drums/bass) in the pocket if they tend to speed up or slow down.


    Just some ideas that work for me...
     
  6. DrSax

    DrSax Member

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    GREAT post!!!
     
  7. mezcalhead

    mezcalhead Member

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    +1, great ideas there!

    My personal rule of thumb is that if I'm not playing with the metronome, it doesn't count as practice .. it's just noodling.

    Another helpful thing I don't think tonedaddy mentioned - use the metronome on 2 & 4, the backbeat. You have to feel out the 1 & 3 yourself and it helps you learn to keep in time better than if the metronome is always marking exactly where to play.
     
  8. ronin32

    ronin32 Member

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    Great post, I really need to learn how to use my metronome. :jo
     
  9. tonedaddy

    tonedaddy Member

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    I tried to convey playing the backbeat with "- strumming exactly between each beat".

    But you've said it better than I did, and I think your method is better than what I suggested.
    :)
    Great idea!
     

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