Luthiers: what's on your workbench?

Discussion in 'The Small Company Luthiers' started by PW214, Jun 3, 2015.

  1. Dave Weir

    Dave Weir Gold Supporting Member

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    I didn't know if there is a name for it yet either. Maybe call it the "Termination." Sounds better than "Stump."
     
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  2. Terry McInturff

    Terry McInturff 40th Anniversary of guitar building! Gold Supporting Member

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  3. IBTom

    IBTom Member

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    I've used it a few times Dave. It's a nice resonant wood and light weight. I bought most of what I've used from the same place as you, albeit several years ago. Keep an eye on it. I've found worms come burrowing out after a guitar was finished. Fortunately, it was inside the control cavity. They ate right thru the shielding paint.

    If any of your pieces have tiny worm or bug holes in them, soak the holes good to kill whatever is inside. Simply filling the holes with sawdust and CA glue like I did wasn't enough, they went the other direction.
     
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  4. dsmc80

    dsmc80 Member

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    Beautiful!
     
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  5. Dave Weir

    Dave Weir Gold Supporting Member

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    It does have some worm holes, and I filled them with CA and sanding dust! I'll drill it out and nuke 'em.
    Thanks!
     
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  6. Terry McInturff

    Terry McInturff 40th Anniversary of guitar building! Gold Supporting Member

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    Thank you my friend
     
  7. Terry McInturff

    Terry McInturff 40th Anniversary of guitar building! Gold Supporting Member

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    Any boring larvae were original with the lumber, i.e., survived the harvesting and transportation. This means that the wood was never kiln-dried (which would have killed all internal larvae etc) which means that it is very possible/likely that the moisture content is north of 6%-8%. Strictly air dried lumber is rarely dry enough to build with so, what is the moisture content looking like?
    Any "worms" and such would travel from the C.O.O. and if it reads 15% moisture or less, a session in your shop's drying booth will probably do the trick! :)
     
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  8. Dave Weir

    Dave Weir Gold Supporting Member

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    Maybe this should have been my "What's on your workbench?" post
    [​IMG]

    I'm not sure how I would know if they are alive at this point. I tapped on it but no response. Stethoscope does not reveal a heartbeat. I doubt you can back them out like a tick.

    I've had the board about 9 months. It's been through the drying cabinet, but I did not put it in the solar kiln. The kiln gets to about 130F this time of year. It sounds like that should do it.
    I get readings of 7.7 to 8.2. I'll ask the guys at TEH if they know if it's kiln dried.

    I went through the rest of the boards I have. One piece of mahogany has a few holes in it. Some of the limba has a hole or two in it. The Ash all looks good.

    Maybe I could train them to bore my wiring holes for me.
     
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  9. deech54

    deech54 Member

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    That makes at least two McKay's that have found their way here. Love mine!
     
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  10. Malinoski

    Malinoski everything wrong possible

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    Been looking at, been fixing a lot of funky 60s guitars lately and it's been rubbing off...

    Hornet #384p got it's name because the day I finished it a nasty hornets nest appeared in my front yard about 3 feet from the sidewalk and it was menacing anything and everything that passed by. Professionals were called in for the quick removal.

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    And the beat goes on...

    70's Kimberly ES-style back to good form:

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    Mid 60s Teisco EP-8T that had suffered a full overhead smash, the back was bashed in and need a creative repair fitting for such a beauty. Plays great now:

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    Classic 60s Silvertone Stratotone with everything new on it. Stratotones were made by Harmony and came in several flavors and under few different brand names, they are fantastic instruments unlike any other and a real treat to play... especially when they are playing like new:

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  11. derekd

    derekd Member

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    This is quite a niche you've developed, Pete. As if your builds weren't niche-y already. These restorations really add another facet of coolness to your brand.

    Are you scrounging the flea markets and yard sales for these old beauties or are they coming to you?
     
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  12. Malinoski

    Malinoski everything wrong possible

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    Thanks Derek, these things come from the greater www. Most are from here in the USA but I've also pulled a few in from Hungary, Ukraine and Russia. There's a ton of them out there, most are over valued and need a lot of work... they all need a lot of work to be playable because they are 50 years old, the original components were kind of crappy and fret jobs atrocious. The reputation of bad guitars by most of the guitar companies during the 60s is somewhat deserved because they just didn't finish them out very well- couldn't get them out of the factory fast enough.
    The bones are almost always solid or can be shored up with some extra support and normal re-gluing. The necks are built like tanks, especially the Japanese necks, but the original terrible fret jobs were the Achilles heal- no way to make them decent players with those original frets... so keep that in mind when you lust after an "original" specimen. And when it says, "Frets still have some life left to them..." , yeah... no, they never had life to begin with.
    I look for the real beaters, the forgotten mojo orphans that still survive... barely. But it's gots to be sexy.
     
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  13. stickyFingerz

    stickyFingerz Supporting Member

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    They're all bolt on guitars as far as I can see... personal preference?
     
  14. Malinoski

    Malinoski everything wrong possible

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    With the imports, bolt-ons are about all there is from 50 years ago. I've fixed a few set neck archtops- Harmony, Kay, a couple of Japanese Kasuga, but for the funky old electrics be they hollow body, semi-hollow or solid body its 95% bolt-on.
    And they are a lot easier to work on!
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2019
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  15. whuppo

    whuppo Member

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  16. sahhas

    sahhas Supporting Member

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    this is what I'm working on:
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    this is from early June, i'm further along, just need to update pics., this is my fiberglass/aluminum neck experiment, currently has a richlite fingerboard epoxied on, and i got it cut down to rough size. currently letting some epoxy set to correct a errant cut from my jigsaw that had a dull blade, next up is getting fret slots cut....it goes slow....
     
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  17. studiodunn

    studiodunn Silver Supporting Member

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    Alder, maple, Lollars/MCP blackbelt, aluminum pick guard at right around 7.5lbs

    I’m going to give it a workout for a couple weeks and maybe try a mahogany neck on it. Then take it apart, finish it again and list it.

    I don’t think my neighbors like it though
     
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  18. redir

    redir Member

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    Man! That Hornet is one of the nicest things I've seen in a long time. I love the way you accentuated the black lines on that thing like that.
     
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  19. pukko

    pukko Member

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    What's on my work couch maybe? Built the first version of this in 2006, thought I'd make a proper one now...

    [​IMG]
     
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