Major and minor pentatonic scales over a minor blues progression

dead of night

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Hi, I'm looking at a table of contents online of a jazz blues guitar book, and one of the chapters is entitled, "Major and Minor Pentatonic Scales Over A Minor Blues Progression."

The book is by Doug Munro and is about Blues Organ Trios.

This intrigues be because I have never heard of using a major pentatonic scale over a minor blues.

How is this done? How do you use a major pentatonic scale over a minor blues?
 

rob13v

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In the key of G, play G maj pent over the I & G min pent over the IV. Or vice versa. Mix em up. Sounds good.
 

Rumy22

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You are going to get a lot of left info from guys here and good luck with it, bit will keep it simple. First off go look at the progression! Any major chords? In the case of jazzy minor blues, the five chord is often a major, or more likely a dominant seven chord. In that case, acknowledging it with a scale that hits those chord tones is advised. In fact, if you are learning jazz, you want to think about hitting chord tones and how notes outside the chord work or not in a given situation.
 

Rumy22

Senior Member
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287
In the key of G, play G maj pent over the I & G min pent over the IV. Or vice versa. Mix em up. Sounds good.

Not his question. He said minor blues progression. The implication is the i chord is minor. So OP, disregard the advice because it does not apply.
 

dead of night

Member
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2,678
You are going to get a lot of left info from guys here and good luck with it, bit will keep it simple. First off go look at the progression! Any major chords? In the case of jazzy minor blues, the five chord is often a major, or more likely a dominant seven chord. In that case, acknowledging it with a scale that hits those chord tones is advised. In fact, if you are learning jazz, you want to think about hitting chord tones and how notes outside the chord work or not in a given situation.
I have not seen the chords in the progression. There is a good possibility the five chord is major or dominant seven, which would explain how a major pentatonic could be used.
 

rob13v

Silver Supporting Member
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1,499
Not his question. He said minor blues progression. The implication is the i chord is minor. So OP, disregard the advice because it does not apply.
You are absolutely correct! I apologize. Had a bit too much of the hooch last night & my reading skills weren't up to snuff.
 

wilto

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I am a guitar hack, but i regularly string together majar, blues and minor scales. Example. Bm blues i will switch between A majar scale and B blues scale. You can try Finding common notes in these 2 scales and experiment with other scales skies the limit.
 

Guitardave

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10,348
Hi, I'm looking at a table of contents online of a jazz blues guitar book, and one of the chapters is entitled, "Major and Minor Pentatonic Scales Over A Minor Blues Progression."

The book is by Doug Munro and is about Blues Organ Trios.

This intrigues be because I have never heard of using a major pentatonic scale over a minor blues.

How is this done? How do you use a major pentatonic scale over a minor blues?

I did a search on the chapter title and it came up in Google books online. You can see the teacher's explanations of what he means. It'll save everyone guessing...

Click on the chapter hyperlink at it'll take you to the relevant chapter in the book.

Here's the link: http://books.google.com/books?id=sw...ales Over A Minor Blues Progression."&f=false
 
M

Member 995

The chord progression he uses is:
E-7 | E-7 | E-7 | Edom7
A-7 | A-7 | E-7 | E-7
C7 | B7#5 | Emaj7 | Emaj7

Is that a common minor blues?

The only places he uses the major pentatonic are over the E dom 7 (sure, why not) and the Emaj7 (not that common of a chord in a minor blues).
 

PatrickE_FenderADV

Silver Supporting Member
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27,869
Check out Warren's playing on Soulshine. He mixes minor and major pents over a minor blues progression... Great example of working in both.
 

Guitardave

Member
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10,348
The chord progression he uses is:
E-7 | E-7 | E-7 | Edom7
A-7 | A-7 | E-7 | E-7
C7 | B7#5 | Emaj7 | Emaj7

Is that a common minor blues?

The only places he uses the major pentatonic are over the E dom 7 (sure, why not) and the Emaj7 (not that common of a chord in a minor blues).
Yep - that was my thought when I looked at the progression.
 

dead of night

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Messages
2,678

dead of night

Member
Messages
2,678
The chord progression he uses is:
E-7 | E-7 | E-7 | Edom7
A-7 | A-7 | E-7 | E-7
C7 | B7#5 | Emaj7 | Emaj7

Is that a common minor blues?

The only places he uses the major pentatonic are over the E dom 7 (sure, why not) and the Emaj7 (not that common of a chord in a minor blues).
This chord progression is extremely interesting, a minor blues resolving to the maj7 of the tonic.

Are there any other odd and interesting progressions in this book? The focus is on the jazz/blues organ trios of the very early to mid sixties. Mccoy Tyner is mentioned.
 

Guitardave

Member
Messages
10,348
Yes, I tried this before I posted, but the google preview only goes to page 28.
Hmm - on my browser (Chrome) it worked fine. Oh well...

Looks like a cool book - I looked thru some of it and it seems to be a fairly straightforward approach to a lot of interesting concepts.
 






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