Managing humidity w/ no case?

Presc

Member
Messages
1,322
I'm mostly an electric player but have been trying to make an effort to play more acoustic - I have a Taylor Big Baby.

It seems like as the seasons/humidity change the action lifts up and gets pretty unplayable. I'd rather not have to keep taking it to the tech; I'm probably just going to try to file down the saddle myself this time.

Here's my question - obviously the in-guitar humidifier is the answer, but I don't have a hard case for this guitar (just a soft case). Without a case, the humidifier doesn't work, correct? Is there a way you can manage the humidity while leaving the guitar on a stand, without getting a room humidifier (I don't really have the space in my little apartment). Thanks.
 

rpguitar

Member
Messages
291
A small room humidifier takes up as much space as a guitar on a stand. It's really the ONLY answer, and it works.

If you file down the saddle because your guitar is now out of whack due to dryness, you will render it impossible to play when/if it becomes properly hydrated. That's a lose-lose approach. I hope you don't mind the blunt answer - I store 30 guitars out in the open in my studio and some of them are delicate, handmade acoustic guitars. I have never had a problem and I adjust them only for playing comfort, not to compensate for humidity extremes.
 

Presc

Member
Messages
1,322
A small room humidifier takes up as much space as a guitar on a stand. It's really the ONLY answer, and it works.

If you file down the saddle because your guitar is now out of whack due to dryness, you will render it impossible to play when/if it becomes properly hydrated. That's a lose-lose approach. I hope you don't mind the blunt answer - I store 30 guitars out in the open in my studio and some of them are delicate, handmade acoustic guitars. I have never had a problem and I adjust them only for playing comfort, not to compensate for humidity extremes.
Thanks, I appreciate the honest answer. The problem is that I lack space because I have so many guitars in my room as it is! I did notice the weather affecting my Heritage semi-hollow as well, but much easier to adjust for that in a non-permanent way. Probably need to figure out a way to consolidate things and get a humidifier in there.
 

Glide

Member
Messages
1,444
Presc,

What is your hygrometer reading in your studio? Does it ever drop below 40%?

If it drops below 40% just bring a bucket of water in and set it in the middle of the floor until it rises slowly back up above 40%. I've watched the trend on mine and it has never gone below 40%. The low in the photo is 34, but I had just taken it out of the packaging. It usually runs in mid 40's until we get the next rain and it will bump up to 55 to 58% and then drop back down to 45% or so and by then we are due for the next rain. But it's never dropped below that 40% which is in the safe zone.

 

Presc

Member
Messages
1,322
No idea - don't have a hygrometer.

Here's a question I was thinking about: most articles say that action gets high when humidity increases. But this guitar was playing nicely through the summer and fall - the action lifted as I got into winter when thing dry out. It's getting more humid now, but seemingly no change in playability. Probably need to take it in, get a setup, and then get a room humidifier.
 

Pietro

2-Voice Guitar Junkie and All-Around Awesome Guy
Messages
16,441
I have another great solution. Dump the soft-side thing and get a case! Humidifying the whole room seems weird with just the one acoustic guitar.
 

RustyAxe

Member
Messages
3,013
You can use a Dampit. Or ... punch some holes in a zip-loc sandwich bag, dampen a NEW sponge, wring it out well, and put it inside the bag, dry the outside, and drop it in the soundhole. Re-dampen it every 3 days or so. It won't help the fretboard if it gets dry (and the fret ends start poking out or getting loose) but it'll help keep the top from sinking (which changes the bridge angle and raises the action). The neck issues (mentioned above) usually only occur under extreme dry conditions, anyway.

Don't shave the saddle, though. Some players have summer and winter saddles, but I see that as a poor excuse for not humidifying.

Find a used case somewhere. Even a chipboard cheapo is better than none. Even your soft case is better than none.
 

jackaroo

Member
Messages
4,681
Ding^^^^

That's the answer

I do this and keep in the case during the winter when it's dry in NYC
 
Messages
8,095
I run a humidifier in the winter to keep my gtrs (acoustic, electric; whatever) and ME happy. My gtrs hate getting dried out and so do I.
 

kevin8122006

Member
Messages
13
I got a small programmable room humidifier at a local big box hardware store this winter for @ $60.00. I set it to 50-60% and fill it up about every other day (2 gallons i think). I keep it on the opposite side of the room (apartment bedroom) from my Taylor 814c on a stand and it works great. The average humidity in the room is @ 45%, measured by my cheapo Hygrometer that I keep beside my guitar. Just remember to keep the room door closed. The only downside that I have found is that there seems to be a fine coating of white "dust" for lack of a better term on the bedroom furniture. I havn't noticed it on my Taylor, and it wipes off very easily. Probably from some of the impuirities in the water. The humidifier does have a filter but I guess it just can't catch everything.
 




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