mandolin adjustable bridge experiments

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by ballynally, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. ballynally

    ballynally Member

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    I've followed the adjustable bridge vs solid bridge arguments over the last few years. The main argument for the solid bridge is that the vibrations of the strings only go through the 2 metal screws to the underside of the bridge, and that that inhibits it at the outset.The solid would then be a better choice. So, many people have tried solid bridges with various results. I'm not going into the pros and cons here. That has been done extensively elsewhere.

    But there is one thing you can do to make the sound travel more to the bridge base on an adjustable. You can easily stick some wood between the upper and lower section, and even some between the lower section and the top of the mandolin.Then you can hear if there's a difference, and take it out if you don't like it. That way you can compare and don't need to spend money and effort into a solid bridge. Unless you're big into maple bridges instead of ebony, of course.
     
  2. JohnRosett

    JohnRosett Member

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    I replaced the 1-piece bridge on my 1918 Gibson A with a Cumberland Acoustics 2-piece. I can honestly say that I can hear no difference.
     
  3. musicofanatic5

    musicofanatic5 Supporting Member

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    Likewise, putting a C A bridge on my 1920 H-1. It had a maple bridge when I got it. I first replaced the maple with an original-type one-piece ebony bridge. Got about a 300% tonal improvement over the maple POS! Then put on the adjustable C A. sounded the same as the one-piece ebony bridge. Maple bridge would make very good kindling for starting a very small fire!!
     

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