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Marshall 4x12 slant cab recover 101

juniorhifikit

Member
Messages
140
OK, well I tried some Jasco paint stripper and a tooth brush (with the cloth removed obviously). It started to work, but the silver paint from the other side started to goosh through. Into the trash with it. I just ordered some large-check cloth from Antique Electronic Supply. I only spent $100 on the cabinet, so I figure I can throw a few bucks into it.

Next is speakers. I'm thinking of 4 different speakers to give me tons of choices in the studio - here were my considerations:

Scumback M75
Celestion Creamback H75
Scumback J75-LD
Warehouse Speakers ET65
Celestion V-type
Celestion Gold

Any thoughts?
 

juniorhifikit

Member
Messages
140
Done and done:

1 Scumback M75 Speaker
1 Scumback H75 Speaker
1 Scumback J75-LD
1 Celestion Vintage 30

Thanks Jim for your help & recommendations!

 

Govan

Member
Messages
46
I am so trying to find out where to find black & white- not black & tan, marshall s&p grill cloth!
 

juniorhifikit

Member
Messages
140
If anyone is looking for Marshall speaker screws, I found them here at British Tools & Fasteners:

2BA x 1" Cheesehead Screw

$0.50 each

For those that may not know (I didn't) these are BSW, or British Standard Whitworth thread - not metric or imperial. I've heard that newer cabinets might be metric now.
 

Scumback Speakers

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
10,996
Good, do you know where we can find the matching T-nuts?
Thanks!
They're in the UK, and they are used for automotive fasteners. They are outrageously priced, $5 USD per T-Nut was the price I was quoted.

Gotta be cheaper for you since they're in the EU, and you are, too.
 

Scumback Speakers

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
10,996
I can't tell you if that fits a 2BA thread or not. Better show the eBay seller the link at British Fasteners LLC. The T-nuts "look right" but that doesn't mean it has the correct screw thread. I'm really not up on all of the UK threads, etc. So you'd better confirm with the seller. Info to do that below.
Good luck!

Jim

2BA x 1" Cheesehead Screw (3245)

http://www.britishfasteners.com/index.php/products/ba-screw-cheesehead-2ba-x-1-3245
 

Sleepless

Member
Messages
91
Hey Jim!
Would you mind posting a couple of pictures of how you staple in the white baffle board piping? Thanks!
 

DrewSCS

Member
Messages
10
Just read this whole thread after detectiving it's existence in the depths of other threads scattered around the net.

Many thanks to Jim & every one else who's contributed!
 

Tidewater Custom Shop

Performance Enhancing Guitarworks
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,691
Hey Jim!
Would you mind posting a couple of pictures of how you staple in the white baffle board piping? Thanks!
A picture's worth a thousand words, but sometimes you need those words to help the illustration. Stapling is pretty straight forward, but learning a couple tricks will facilitate success.

The following works for me. Others may have another process, and I welcome their feedback.

Some things to consider first:
  • If you're adding piping to an existing baffle that was not cut to allow the additional material, then use your best judgment as to whether it's viable.
  • If I'm using piping on a new baffle, I will staple the grill cloth on the backside of the baffle, rather than the edge. This ensures less bulk for the flange to lay against, and no obstructions (i.e. other staples).
  • DON'T FORGET TO ALLOW SUITABLE CLEARANCE for piping in your measurements if building a new baffle.
Second, to clarify a couple terms.
  • Seemingly obvious, and for my purposes, the baffle 'face' is the large part on the front that is seen once the baffle is correctly installed. The speaker is installed in parallel plane behind the baffle.
  • The baffle edge is the part that sets against the inside portion of the cabinet surrounding the speaker(s).
  • The molded plastic piping can be segregated in two parts - the bead (the round 'piping' you see), and the flange (the flat part that you staple to the baffle).
  • The apex, for this purpose, is the point at which the face and the edge of the baffle meet, usually at a 90°.
  • The fastener is just a fancy word, in this case, for the staple. It helps to unencumber word structure.
Tools:
  • Heavy duty spring tensioned stapler to drive staples (1/4" - 1/2" depth)
  • Small flat head screwdriver to pry up poorly sunk staples
  • Small channel lock pliers (sub needle nose, or standard) to pull poorly sunk staples
  • Small flat hammer to fully set poorly sunk staples
  • Utility knife with new blade


Laying piping is about 'feel'.
  • With the grill cloth satisfactorily installed, choose a starting location and direction. Typically, I start at the top center, ensure the piping beginning end is cut perfectly perpendicular.
  • Lay the flange flat upon the edge of the baffle, then press the bead against the face of the baffle until you feel it set flush against the face. You'll actually feel this. The flange must be completely flat against the baffle edge, while the bead should not rise above, or sag below, the apex of the edge and the face.
  • Using heavy duty stapler, install the first fastener.
  • Make sure it's correctly seated, flush and secure. If not, use a small hammer to set it. Remove and try again if one of the legs goes awry.
  • Staples are set roughly 3-4" apart. I've seen closer and farther from OEM.
  • While pulling the piping taut with one hand, and feeling the bead with the other, place your next fastener.
  • Corners are tricky - I remove flange material in triangular sections with a utility knife to remove bulk and create some flex for a smooth and flat transition. A staple is placed as close a possible on each edge approaching the corner.
  • Repeat fully around the baffle.
  • The terminal seam is created carefully. It would be a shame to make it all this way only to fail here. This is where your keen eye and sharp razor come in handy. With about 4" remaining to the terminal point, I overlap the taut loose end with the beginning point and mark with the razor, then pull away and cut perfectly perpendicular. Check the fit, adjust if necessary, then finish fastening.
  • I've used angled cuts at the terminal point with success. I've also placed a metal or rigid plastic rod inside a tubular bead to preserve the 'linearity'. Sometimes the ends pull away from each other...
  • For a messed up terminal seam, a solution I've employed is some fancy tolex work. It actually became my 'signature' for custom builds (not the messed up part, but the tolex work to cover the seam).
 
Last edited:

nasdak

Member
Messages
8
Hello,
It seems to be the place to ask :)
Just got that (around) 1969 cab

Speakers are 55hz pre-rolas
So It's a 1935b "bass" cab.
Tolex has has removed and wood varnished.
Cloth has been changed, piping's gone.

I want to give him is original look !

Original tolex was red, but if black is easier to source, i'll go with vlack.

I think i need :
- levant (not elephant) tolex
- bw "salt and pepa" cloth
- white piping around the baffle and on the top

Am i right ?


Can i glue the tolex on the varnished wood or should i strip the varnish ?

Thanks,
Pierre
 

big mike

Cathode biased
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
13,518
SOunds about right.
I'd probably scuff the varnish to make sure the glue will stick....maybe sand it off.

Mojotone usually has the right stuff for tolex, piping and grillcloth.
 

My Guitar Weeps

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
106
Hello,
It seems to be the place to ask :)
Just got that (around) 1969 cab

Speakers are 55hz pre-rolas
So It's a 1935b "bass" cab.
Tolex has has removed and wood varnished.
Cloth has been changed, piping's gone.

I want to give him is original look !

Original tolex was red, but if black is easier to source, i'll go with vlack.

I think i need :
- levant (not elephant) tolex
- bw "salt and pepa" cloth
- white piping around the baffle and on the top

Am i right ?


Can i glue the tolex on the varnished wood or should i strip the varnish ?

Thanks,
Pierre
I'm no expert by any means but I believe you'll need the smaller gold piping for the top of the cab and bottom of the cab for the countersunk piping channels.... and it would be a 1935"a" cab instead of "b" :aok


 

nasdak

Member
Messages
8
I'm no expert by any means but I believe you'll need the smaller gold piping for the top of the cab and bottom of the cab for the countersunk piping channels.... and it would be a 1935"a" cab instead of "b" :aok


More an expert than me!
Is there some tutorial somewhere? Wich size to cut, where to begin...
 






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