Men of a Certain Age, help me understand a finish option?

JKjr

Member
Messages
987
OK, well I'm one of those "gentlemen". HS class of 1977. Now if I can remember that far back....
We hated those colors then. They haven't grown on us.
I stripped the finish on a strat one week. Yes I said week. Paint remover wouldn't touch it. Belt sanded it off in stinking plastic lumps. Found a four piece body underneath, 3 alder and a hunk of baseball bat ash. Painted it with black Schwinn bicycle lacquer and moved on.
 

rockabilly69

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,049
At 18 years old in 1976, I was not immune to draw of Mocha Brown, as clearly seen in this band shot from my Air Force days...



But, these were pre-TGP days and I already modded that guitar to the hilt, with the then, fashionista approved, DiMarizio Dual Sound in the neck, and and a Super D in the bridge. Do I get old guy points for that:)
 

tbp0701

Member
Messages
523
I'm not quite that old, but my completely speculative guess is that browns and natural shades were popular at the time, and natural/brown stains for wooden instruments has always been popular. (Also, my understanding is that some auto-inspired colors like Candy Apple Red and Lake Placid Blue take a fair amount of time to get right, so a brown stain may have been faster).

And with general cost cutting, guitar bodies were being made from more pieces of wood (and less waste is a good thing). The amount of time making each guitar was being reduced as well.

Thus, the bodies may not have been all that pretty, so they just applied more finish. Problem solved!
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
33,785
A friend of mine has one of those bland brown early '70s strats, small headstock and with a cast tremblock/saddles, (3?) screw neck.
Good sounding Strat. Sticky neck, wide, low frets...not so cool.
Point is.. a good guitar is a good guitar and good tone is wherever you find it.
Paint is paint. Put on a skin if you don't like it.;)
 
Messages
3,444
I’m not sure what the deal was with Fender, but I know Gibson made a lot of “Walnut” stained ES-335s and SGs in the late ‘60’s and ‘70’s. Maybe it was the influence of George Harrison’s brown Gretsch Country Gentleman or something else, but dark brown was very popular during those years.
 

babadethkat

Member
Messages
219
The 70's get such a bad rap, some justified but it is what it is. Brown, Orange and Pea Green or Avocado were prevalent. When you see a brown fender and large headstock its a creature of its time. Just because it's not garnered the adulation of say 50's and 60's it would be sad if they were all painted Sea Foam Green! Style goes in circles. One day Brown 70's strats may be the epitome of cool again. I know in the mid 90's the 70's colours were huge amongst indie kids in the UK. A product of its time and should be appreciated for what it represents.
 

stevieboy

Clouds yell at me
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
37,952
I think it's an okay color, talking about the Fender brown ones. I don't remember that there were tons of them out there back then, some of course. Browns give a feeling of wood and seem somewhat natural which might be the appeal.

Walnut is my least favorite of the 335 quintet (sunburst, cherry, natural, ebony, walnut) and I used to really dislike it. But it's grown on me a little, still in fifth place, but today I don't think I'd avoid it though, if I was shopping for a 335 and found one that I liked that was walnut.
 
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johnsav

Senior Member
Messages
1,508
At 18 years old in 1976, I was not immune to draw of Mocha Brown, as clearly seen in this band shot from my Air Force days...



But, these were pre-TGP days and I already modded that guitar to the hilt, with the then, fashionista approved, DiMarizio Dual Sound in the neck, and and a Super D in the bridge. Do I get old guy points for that:)
Greg Brady was your bass player?!
 




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