mic for guitar amp

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by EVT, Jan 1, 2005.

  1. EVT

    EVT Member

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    Hi everyone,
    I was wondering what mic's you are using to mic guitar amps for recording. I'm mic'ng a blues junior.

    I read the Shure Beta 57a was good??
    Any other recommendations?
    Thanks
    evt
     
  2. MickYoumans

    MickYoumans Member

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    A Shure SM57 is a great inexpensive mic to use. There are plenty of other great mics you can use, but if you are looking for the best bang-for-the-buck mic for recording guitar, that's it!
     
  3. redmax61

    redmax61 Member

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    The SM57 is THE microphone for recording guitar.

    If you don't like the way it sounds, experiment with position and angle in relation to the speaker cone. One of my favorite is with the mic perpindicular to and almost touching the grille cloth and centered on the junction between the cone and the outer surround on a V-30. I spent about two days setting up and recording 30 second snippets then changing nothing but mic location. The results were quite surprising.
     
  4. Greggy

    Greggy Member

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    Are you referring to the junction between the center dust cap and the cone surround? What is the outer surround in your parlance?

    For higher gain recording, I almost always angle the mic around 30 to 45 degrees across the center line running perpendicular out from the speaker center, such that the mic begins on one side of center, the capsule is roughly touching the perpendicular line above, and points about half way up the cone on the opposite side. Without the angle, I get way too much treble and high end hash. This way I get the center hi frequencies radiating from the speaker center on an angle, thus attenuating these per the polar pattern of the mic. At the same time I'm taking more of the midrange straight on from up the cone surface. It works.
     
  5. Greggy

    Greggy Member

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    One other point, the SM57 is very sensitive and has a tight sweet spot in my experience. Gotta move it around alot until you find the right position. Whereas the Sennheiser e609 silver is much easier to position IMO. Both sound great, but I prefer the e609 unless I want a thick mid range track like a blues lead.
     
  6. fatang

    fatang Member

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    A few questions:

    What sound are you going for?

    What will you run the mic through?

    How much do you want to spend?

    As noted above the SM57 is a known go to mic for guitar but it's one of a lot of options. Greggy's E609 suggestion is a great one, there are two versions (black, silver) to be aware of.

    Robert
     
  7. MichaelK

    MichaelK Member

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    This technique was shown to me two years ago by an engineer who learned it from Eric Johnson. I like it so much that now it's all I use for electric:

    Speaker cab in a very resonant small space, like a tile bathroom. SM57 about 1.5 inches from the grill, dead-on axis, pointed directly at the seam where the dust cap meets the cone.

    The mic is close enough to get a big sound from the speaker, yet with enough distance to pick up just a hint of the room reflections.
     
  8. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    +1 on that, thank goodness. I just started recording with mine for the first time today. I plunked the E609 on the grill about 4" off center on a Red Fang, and it picked up exactly what I was hearing in the room. Absolutely no fooling around with it, no experimentation, got it right on the first try entirely by accident. Just gotta love that. Imagine how good it could be for someone who knew what he was doing?
     
  9. EVT

    EVT Member

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    Hi all,

    fatang:
    "A few questions:

    What sound are you going for?

    What will you run the mic through?

    How much do you want to spend?"

    I'm splitting the signal:
    One going into my full-drive II fulltone pedal onto a track on the fostex vf-16x, and the other I'm running a mic throughg a safesound p1 to mic up a blues jr, into another track.
    I wasn't exactly sure how much I was going to spend, but if these mic's that were recommended are making a lot of people happy about 100 bucks or a little less sounds good to me. However, if there were any others that were more expensive and better for this purpose I would like to know. I am actually keeping info on a file of equipment that is recommended (even out of my range now) for later on down the road if I can I will buy it if possible.

    I am recording rhythm guitar on an almost clean sound a tiny bit of distortion from the fulltone. The style is pop/rock and I use a drum machine which I record direct and then I mic them up through my tannoy monitors (with a studio projects B1)...to a single track. I then just mix in a little of the mic'd drum track to add a fuller sound. It helps to make things better (not so stale digital sounding).

    I have just recently began mic'ng things because I needed some depth in my mixes, and I read about these ideas. Before I was just going everything direct.
    ( so far, I am very pleased)

    It all started when I ran into this article:
    http://www.recordinginstitute.com/R2KREQ/excomp.htm

    Any other info. on this sort of stuff would be great.. links etc.

    thanks everybody!
    :) evt
     
  10. seafoamer

    seafoamer Member

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    Lately, I've been exclusively using a sm57 & a Neumann u87 for gtrs.
     
  11. EVT

    EVT Member

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    Hi all,
    Also, I ran into a good article on mic'ng a guitar amp. However, there are two mic's involved. A dynamic and a condenser mic.

    http://www.homerecordingconnection.com/news.php?action=view_story&id=140

    I am going to try it with an sm57 and a studio projects B1. Although, I'm not exactly sure about how much of a problem I'm going to face because of phasing. How do you all do it, besides the actual positioning... where do you go from each mic? From what I understood in the article, I think I'm going run the B1 through my safesound P1 then into a track on my Fostex 16ex, and then the sm57 through my behringer mixer.. into another track on the fostex.
    ????
    Sorry for my rambling on....


    :) evt
     
  12. fatang

    fatang Member

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    Here's a cool tip from Michael Wagener (from the new King's X sessions)

    So the setup is as follows:
    I send pink noise to only one side of the cab, then listen with headphones in mono for the best placement of the 121. It is really hard to explain, but if you move the mic around in front of the speaker, (sideways and back and forth) you will hear the sweetspot when you come across it. When the best spot for the first mic is found, send pink noise to the other side as well, at equal volume. Split the headphone feed in your console to left and right and make sure it's exactly the same volume left and right. Then, by listening to your headphones (preferably a set with extreme isolation, since youÂ’ll sit in front of a blasting guitar cab) you move the second mic towards and away from the speaker until the pink noise appears in the middle of your head. That means it's in phase with the other mic. It takes a little practice, because the two sides sound different, but after a while you can clearly hear the noise moving from one side through the middle to the other side.
     

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