Midight mass music mode?

AXEnGEAR4J

Senior Member
Messages
5,898
Phrygian Mode? Octave species scale? or? and?
- more specifically the Catholic
 
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drgonzoguitar

Member
Messages
4,709
Yes and yes. Here is something that might help:

"The system of oktoёchos (eight modes), introduced into Christianity by Severus (fifth century), brought a welcomed organization to a complex liturgical tradition of calendar, hymns, and psalms. From Syria the eight modes spread to Byzantium and to Western Europe. There is not one root oktoёchos from which all the others are derived. As early as the ninth century BC at least two sets of eight modes were in existence, which employed two distinct musical scales—near Asiatic (Persian) and classical Greek. Since then it has been possible to distinguish between scores of oktoёchos in almost every ethnic culture. Therefore, each eight mode tradition must be studied separately in order to see any congruent, systematic musical variation between modes, but the three major Christian chant traditions are the Syrian, Byzantine (Greek), and Roman Catholic.

The first and second modes in Syrian, Armenian, Byzantine, and Gregorian chant have a common root. The root of the first mode is called “classical Greek Dorian” by Western Church musicians, but this may or may not correspond to an actual classical Greek mode. There is evidence of the first (Dorian), third (Phrygian), and fifth (Lydian) Gregorian modes in Syrian music (and all modal systems), but these three modes in Syrian chant go way beyond the spectrum of music found in the Gregorian modes.

Byzantine chant also has hymn modes that fall outside of the eight modes of its tradition, but these are an exception as the majority of hymns do conform to its musical system of eight modes. Byzantine modes are not categorized by a common finalis but by melodic formulas which differ in pattern from Western music but are somewhat consistent and discernible to the trained scholar. Byzantium, in particular, had a great deal of influence on the Western adaptation of eight Church tones.

The eight Gregorian tones are the most highly developed and most clear. The four “authentic” modes (1, 3, 5, 7) are the most developed. It seems clear that from looking at these three traditions, Syrian, Byzantine, and Gregorian, the number eight is more a theoretical than a technical construction. Each tradition has its own distinct musical modes with very little interrelationship, and not all music within these traditions is actually limited to these eight modes. Nevertheless, the significance lies in that the ideaof eight modes was passed on from Greco-Syria to Western Europe via Byzantium."

Source: http://www.catholicworldreport.com/Item/1927/the_hellenic_origins_of_church_music.aspx
 

AXEnGEAR4J

Senior Member
Messages
5,898
Thank you, when you put your ear to this the transitions are astounding, funny how all of a sudden you recognize something you've heard for decades. I hope to use this for my next chapter of writing with the root being instrumental soft/hard rock
 

Steve Hotra

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,603
Yes and yes. Here is something that might help:

"The system of oktoёchos (eight modes), introduced into Christianity by Severus (fifth century), brought a welcomed organization to a complex liturgical tradition of calendar, hymns, and psalms. From Syria the eight modes spread to Byzantium and to Western Europe. There is not one root oktoёchos from which all the others are derived. As early as the ninth century BC at least two sets of eight modes were in existence, which employed two distinct musical scales—near Asiatic (Persian) and classical Greek. Since then it has been possible to distinguish between scores of oktoёchos in almost every ethnic culture. Therefore, each eight mode tradition must be studied separately in order to see any congruent, systematic musical variation between modes, but the three major Christian chant traditions are the Syrian, Byzantine (Greek), and Roman Catholic.

The first and second modes in Syrian, Armenian, Byzantine, and Gregorian chant have a common root. The root of the first mode is called “classical Greek Dorian” by Western Church musicians, but this may or may not correspond to an actual classical Greek mode. There is evidence of the first (Dorian), third (Phrygian), and fifth (Lydian) Gregorian modes in Syrian music (and all modal systems), but these three modes in Syrian chant go way beyond the spectrum of music found in the Gregorian modes.

Byzantine chant also has hymn modes that fall outside of the eight modes of its tradition, but these are an exception as the majority of hymns do conform to its musical system of eight modes. Byzantine modes are not categorized by a common finalis but by melodic formulas which differ in pattern from Western music but are somewhat consistent and discernible to the trained scholar. Byzantium, in particular, had a great deal of influence on the Western adaptation of eight Church tones.

The eight Gregorian tones are the most highly developed and most clear. The four “authentic” modes (1, 3, 5, 7) are the most developed. It seems clear that from looking at these three traditions, Syrian, Byzantine, and Gregorian, the number eight is more a theoretical than a technical construction. Each tradition has its own distinct musical modes with very little interrelationship, and not all music within these traditions is actually limited to these eight modes. Nevertheless, the significance lies in that the ideaof eight modes was passed on from Greco-Syria to Western Europe via Byzantium."

Source: http://www.catholicworldreport.com/Item/1927/the_hellenic_origins_of_church_music.aspx

Thanks for this!
 




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