Mini Vent vs LEX vs Roto Choir

P8t8r

Member
Messages
1,606
Those three are in the same pricerange, have similar footprint, similar features. From the YT demos I like Mini Vent most, it also looks the coolest of all free for me. Is there any reason I should consider getting one of the other two and forget about the Mini Vent? I can't afford anything more expensive than these, but maybe I'm missing some pedals? It must have stereo out (mono input is fine), and slow/fast speed with graceful acceleration, switchable via footswitch. The more it nails Pink Floyd and Cream's Badge the better.
 
Messages
1,864
The mini-vent is easily the most authentic and accurate sounding.
The others have more features......depends what's more important to you.


I'd go by sound.
 

BBender

Member
Messages
1,882
I own the Mini Vent, and have owned the Lex. The Mini is more authentic sounding, and you can change the settings a bit.
 

Joe Perry

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
3,104
I may have to track down a Mini Vent. I've never been completely happy with my Lex. I'm not sure if its operator error or what?

Do you guys have the guitar or organ version? Do you run it with two amps?
 

groovemeister

Member
Messages
898
I own the Mini Vent, and have owned the Lex. The Mini is more authentic sounding, and you can change the settings a bit.
hey man, i have the mini vent also - how do you change the settings a bit? i thought there was only fast and slow and the overdrive button at the back?
 

BBender

Member
Messages
1,882
It's in the manual, but recalling from my memory, if you hold down both buttons while plugging in the power, it brings you into the tweak mode. You can change the speed, distance, and overdrive on channel B.

hey man, i have the mini vent also - how do you change the settings a bit? i thought there was only fast and slow and the overdrive button at the back?
 

hamerman55

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,001
I really love my Lex. It sounds close enough for me to the real thing (as much as any pedal can through a Princeton) and I love the tweakability. It is easy to adjust the parameters, and has a good pedal board foot print. The favorite switch lets me have two complete setups, which is nice. I haven't played the others, but I am one satisfied Lex owner. I used it today at a jam, and it worked fine in a band context. The other options are probably good in their own right, but I just wanted to note that I am satisfied.

One thing to ask about the Gilmour sound. Which song/performance are you seeking to replicate? Much of DSOTM is a Univibe. When he uses a Leslie or related rotating speaker system, he mixes it in low withw straight signal. The Boss RT-20 can do that, and is another great choice.You mightnbe able to get of of those used for under $100.
 

P8t8r

Member
Messages
1,606
The Boss RT-20 can do that, and is another great choice.You mightnbe able to get of of those used for under $100.
I don't think I'll go Boss route this time. RT-20 is an old design, big footprint and what's most important sounds very artificial to me. I judge by YT demos now. There are cheaper solutions for extremely cool blinking screens like the one on RT-20.

I found out that local shop has one RT-20 in stock, maybe I'll try it myself.
 

hamerman55

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,001
The key thing with the Boss is that is has a dry level and a wet level. Gilmour runs amps and Yamaha Leslie-type systems at the same time and blends them. See the extensive article on Bjorn's Gilmourish.com site. The Lex has the mike position, which can make the effect more or less intense. For some, that might be all they need. Think of the potential signal path. Most guys using Leslies switch to either an amp, or the Lesli, running the full signal through one of the other. Gilmour runs his Hiwatts and the Yamaha rotating speaker system at the same time, and mikes both. That way you have the shimmery chorus sound of the Leslie, and the direct guitar signal. You could do the same with any of the other Leslie emulators by splitting you signal prior to the Leslie pedal, run one line to the pedal and one bypassing it. After the Leslie, mix them together as you like. A Boss Line Switcher pedal does this well.
The only reason I bring this up and the Boss is the OP wanted the Gilmour sound. Gilmour rarely runs straight into a Leslie, like Clapton does on Badge.
 

P8t8r

Member
Messages
1,606
I'm really grateful for your input, thank you. You mentioned Boss Line Switcher which is my secret weapon and I have no less than two of them for situations and ideas like the one you mentioned. RT-20 just doesn't speak to me, but like I said - all I heard are only YT demos. I can try Boss myself before I pull the trigger, however. With the others I can only rely on the return policy ;)
 

hamerman55

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,001
I'm really grateful for your input, thank you. You mentioned Boss Line Switcher which is my secret weapon and I have no less than two of them for situations and ideas like the one you mentioned. RT-20 just doesn't speak to me, but like I said - all I heard are only YT demos. I can try Boss myself before I pull the trigger, however. With the others I can only rely on the return policy ;)
Gilmourish.com - http://www.gilmourish.com/?p=2872 - at this link reviews the Lex and in some of his other reviews covers the Boss. Bjorn, and the folks that add cooments to his reviews are really helpful. His opinion of the RT-20 was that it is a good pedal that does the Leslie thing, but not as well as other pedals. Basically better than a Univibe, but not quite as good as a Lex. However, he does find it useful.

The Leslie thing is always going to be tricky, as I doubt most people, including those on this board, have ever been in the presence of a real Leslie. We've heard very good recordings of them, however, but usually in a band mix. It isn't like one can drop into a Guitar Center, fire up a Marshall stack with a Les Paul, and get a real sense of what you're going for. YouTube videos are going to be tricky too. The amp you run it through will be critical. Real Leslies are huge beasts big enough to fully amplify a Hammond B3. Very full range. Yesterday, I ran my Lex through a Hall Of Fame Reverb and then into a nice vintage Blackface Princeton. It sounded awesome. Did it sound like a "real" Leslie. No, but it delivered the feel and vibe of a Leslie that I wanted. It has the chorus-phaser-vibe with overdrive thing, with ramp up and down. The RT-20 can do this too, just not as well, but has the Line Switcher sort of built in.

Do think of any of these as an amp-in-a-box. Ideally, you would run one into a good stereo PA with a full range sound, so as to catch all the nuances. More practically, try to run them into a loud clean amp, to appreciate the pedal. Not that you can't treat it like a chorus and run them into distorted amps (my Princeton was on the edge of breakup), for example, but it depends on the i tent of the designer. I do think they build these to sound good with a relatively clean guitar amp with 12 in speakers, as that is pretty common kit. I believe the Ventilators try to work well with keyboards too. I am pretty sure the Lex and RT-20 are teeaked for guitar and guitar amps.

My experience with the Lex, the RT-20 and the Destination Rotation Single, all of which I have, is that all of them get much of the Leslie feel and experience. The Lex is just better at it by a long shot. But I do like and use the others even though they aren't as perfect. They are good chorusy-phasey mod pedals with ramp up and down. The Lex is great as you can tweak the tone to your amp more, if you think of the upper and lower rotor levels as "tone" controls. I could add a bit more bass to my Princeton, for instance.
 

ruger9

Member
Messages
9,587
Never had the Mini-vent; but between the Lex and Roto-Choir, if all someone wants is a good slow and fast speed with no tweaking, they are interchangeable... they sound VERY MUCH alike. Online demos of Rotochoir don't do it justice.

If you're a tweaker, both can be tweaked, but of course the Lex can be tweaked more.

I still have my Rotosphere. :D
 

Crimson Queen

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
4,057
I have a RT-20 and use to have the Rotosphere. Both do a credible static leslie sound. When I played live, I used an MXR Flanger and it sounded close enough. The magic of the Neo Mini resides, for me, in the switching of the two speeds. The swirl when you go back and forth between slow and fast is the most realistic sound I have ever heard from a leslie emulator.
 

P8t8r

Member
Messages
1,606
When I played live, I used an MXR Flanger and it sounded close enough. The magic of the Neo Mini resides, for me, in the switching of the two speeds. The swirl when you go back and forth between slow and fast is the most realistic sound I have ever heard from a leslie emulator.
Same for me! I had good results with both MXR Micro Chorus and Micro Flanger but the way the speed changes is what got me going ;)
 

zztomato

Senior Member
Messages
11,394
After a fairly lengthy search I've ended up with the mini-vent and am quite satisfied that I've chosen well. Have owned a Lex and Rotosphere as well as the large vent, and have tried others. The rotosphere blended with the guitar the best out of all of them but was noisy and big. The Lex is digital all the way down to the grainy, annoying, harsh, fake sound- wait, let me tell you how I really feel.
The mini-vent still has a slight hint of digital phoniness to it but it's very minimal and for the convenience and noise free operation, I can live with it. A mix knob would be helpful but not absolutely necessary. I set mine with preset A clean and B with just the 1st degree of drive.
 

kurt1981

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,596
I'be been through a bunch, and my observations are:
boss, nice pedal, sounds good but there's a weird cut off to the notes like a noise gate, which I found annoying, and it sounds a bit artificial. The rotosphere is great, adds some hiss straight in to the amp, but honestly, you don't get much of that honky horn thing, the sphere seems more like a great vibratone to me. The lex is cool, though again, I don't hear as much of the right midrange honk of the horn, it's kind of there, but not like the vent. I've played the vent but don't have the cash to get one, and for me, it's the most authentic, really gets that leslie sound, though again, don't know if it's worth the $$$. I really want to pick up a roto choir to hear how it compares. I've been thinking maybe the way to go is one of the cheaper pedals with an EQ pedal to simulate the horn sound.
 

P8t8r

Member
Messages
1,606
I played Boss today. It's not for me. It sounds better than I expected, but no as good as I want it to. Too many parameters to control for me, many meh setting, hard to find something nice. I bet it sounds convincing in a band context as it the territory where Boss excels imho. Just not perfect piece of gear for gear snobs nor recording. Just my 0.02. So the Mini Vent is tempting.
 

jakethesnake

Member
Messages
1,658
I use to use the Lex alot but lately I've been sick of it. I want the leslie tones but the Lex just isn't cutting it. I think it also has something to do with the Marshall. Seems better thru my other Fender amps.
 




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