Minor Blues with IV-minor - Since I Been Lovin' You

Motterpaul

Tone is in the Ears
Messages
13,678
There are not a lot of really good ripping solos for a blues with a I-minor and a IV-minor chord (this one goes to V7 dom, but only briefly,) the turnaround has minor blues chord-tones throughout otherwise.

The playing here just mesmerizes me, and it is cool to take note that Jimmy Paige plays the true IV-minor scale throughout the song because that is what is called for. This is one of the best things (technically) he ever played in my book.

I think some players struggle with this concept - this is blues where you are NOT looking for the common tones, you are playing the chord tones, and it is as classy as any blues ever written.

 

Ed DeGenaro

Silver Supporting Member
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25,652
The V7? You mean V7sus, it also spends a good amount of time on the v-.

But anyways what you mean by the vi minor in terms of scale. When he's on the i Cmin he avoids any 6 like the plague and it's pretty much straight Cm Penta, other than the rate 9 (D) and even rarer b5 (Gb).
When goes to the iv or the VI he lays into the Ab (the b6 of the key or b3 of the Fm or 6 of the Ab chord).
That's par for the course for literally every minor Blues...The chords get treated is a no 6 or Dorian.
 

Motterpaul

Tone is in the Ears
Messages
13,678
The V7? You mean V7sus, it also spends a good amount of time on the v-.

But anyways what you mean by the vi minor in terms of scale. When he's on the i Cmin he avoids any 6 like the plague and it's pretty much straight Cm Penta, other than the rate 9 (D) and even rarer b5 (Gb).
When goes to the iv or the VI he lays into the Ab (the b6 of the key or b3 of the Fm or 6 of the Ab chord).
That's par for the course for literally every minor Blues...The chords get treated is a no 6 or Dorian.

I appreciate your deeper analysis. I was mostly just watching the choice of solo notes but the chords in the turnaround are interesting and I never really broke them down.

I like the end of the turnaround with the bending up from G to Ab (with bass going from D to Db).
 

Ed DeGenaro

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
25,652
I appreciate your deeper analysis. I was mostly just watching the choice of solo notes but the chords in the turnaround are interesting and I never really broke them down.

I like the end of the turnaround with the bending up from G to Ab (with bass going from D to Db).
I still don't get what you mean by the IV minor. Dorian?
 

huw

Member
Messages
1,501
As there are many, many live versions available it's interesting to note that they did begin to introduce hints of C Dorian , both in Page's guitar lines and in JPJs keyboard accompaniment.

Only on the Cm chord, before you ask... ;)
 

Ed DeGenaro

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
25,652
As there are many, many live versions available it's interesting to note that they did begin to introduce hints of C Dorian , both in Page's guitar lines and in JPJs keyboard accompaniment.

Only on the Cm chord, before you ask... ;)
I think there's one nat 6 in the Cm, and zero flat 6.
That's just it the 6 in minor being the avoid note because it needs resolving, yet over the iv, V, VI etc it's precisely why it sounds cool.
But that F Dorian/C Aeolian is so minor tune as well that it's about as much a Blues as Gary Moore's Still Got Autumn Leaves :)
 

joebloggs13

Member
Messages
4,202
There are not a lot of really good ripping solos for a blues with a I-minor and a IV-minor chord (this one goes to V7 dom, but only briefly,) the turnaround has minor blues chord-tones throughout otherwise.

The playing here just mesmerizes me, and it is cool to take note that Jimmy Paige plays the true IV-minor scale throughout the song because that is what is called for. This is one of the best things (technically) he ever played in my book.

I think some players struggle with this concept - this is blues where you are NOT looking for the common tones, you are playing the chord tones, and it is as classy as any blues ever written.


That vid is indeed impressive. Liked it a lot. Thanks for posting!
 

Ed DeGenaro

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
25,652
I assume he means the progression has a minor iv chord rather than the traditional dominant 7 found in many blues songs.
Obviously it's minor...but that could indeed be the part i was not getting.
 

Rob G

Member
Messages
2,658
Am I missing something, don't most minor blues songs have a minor iv? Minor i to iv

The Thrill Is Gone, As The Years Go Passing By, etc.

The V is usually the dom7 chord, taken from harmonic minor.
 




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