Mixing major and minor pentatonics

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Zingeroo, Dec 8, 2015.

  1. Zingeroo

    Zingeroo Member

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    When playing blues, are there any guidelines on when to switch from major to minor? Such as minor over the I, major over IV, etc?
     
  2. gennation

    gennation Member

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    I have a (free) 50+ example lesson on this exact thing. http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/AdvPent/AvdPentTOC.htm

    Look through it in order. Read the introduction as it tell show I found it, or first understood it, that will give you the premise of the lesson as a whole. There are audio examples with tab, fretboard diagrams, and more.

    It's such a common used sound and application that lessons will (literally) take you from SRV, Hendrix, Alvin Lee, Jimmy Page...to Albert Lee, Ricky Skaggs, Pete Anderson...to Glenn Miller, John Mclaughlin...and I'm sure there are some I am forgetting.

    Just start at the very beginning and work your way through.
     
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  3. mojo jones

    mojo jones Member

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    Instead of thinking about those five-note scales, learn several solos from players you admire. It won't take long to see were they employ a minor Pentatonic scale and where they use a Major Pentatonic scale, or bits thereof.
     
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  4. JonRock

    JonRock Member

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    the real obvious one is the minor 3rd goes great over the IV chord because the minor 3rd of the key is the flat 7th of the IV chord. The maj3rd of the key is going to sound a little weird over the IV chord because its the maj7th of the IV chord....there generally arent too many maj7th sounds in the blues. Then again most anything is possible lol
     
  5. joelster

    joelster Silver Supporting Member

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    Hmmm... Rules... Does it sound good? Do it.
     
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  6. clamflatslim

    clamflatslim Member

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    to get started use maj on I minor with the blue note on IV and V.this will get you familiar with the sound and note choices.then mix it up,as joelster said ...does it sound good?
     
  7. Phletch

    Phletch Member

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    The first thing I'd do is to start thinking "blues" and not diatonic "mixing major and minor". The blues is its own thing.

    Check this out and really give it some thought:
     
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  8. T92780

    T92780 Silver Supporting Member

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    Without derailing thread, quickly, what the does each of these "B3" etc relate to, or mean...as noted below?

    I7 with b3, IV7 with b5, and V7 with b7.
     
  9. Phletch

    Phletch Member

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    b=flat. It's the closest thing the keyboard has to the "real" flat symbol - "". So b7, b3, and such.
     
  10. T92780

    T92780 Silver Supporting Member

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    What does the 3 mean, b3.
     
  11. JonRock

    JonRock Member

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    b3 = flat 3rd etc
     
  12. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    I learned some Jim Messina double-stop licks that were basically harmonizing the notes of the minor pentatonic with the major pentatonic.
    So C-E (E on top), Eb-G, F-A, G-C, Bb-D. Play them 'claw' style as double-stops.
    I think I got it from the second Poco album. It's only been forty years ago.
     
  13. bloomz

    bloomz Member

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    Any example of a mixed one to learn?
     
  14. mojo jones

    mojo jones Member

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    I don't know what you mean by mixed? Listen to a Blues or Rock tune you like (Thrill is Gone, B.B.King; Sultans of Swing, Dire Straights)
    Learn the solo and all the licks in the particular tune. In that solo, and in the licks played throughout the tune, you hear all the appropriate places to use either minor Pentatonic or Major Pentatonic scales.
     
  15. Guitardave

    Guitardave Supporting Member

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    Assuming its a major blues then Minor of the key over everything, major for the chord you are on.
     
  16. ibis

    ibis Member

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  17. bloomz

    bloomz Member

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    I mean one that has a mixed major/minor solo.
     
  18. mojo jones

    mojo jones Member

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    Most Blues and Rock solos have both elements. If you stumble across some tunes that are all of one or the other, won't hurt to learn those, too.
     
  19. fezz parka

    fezz parka Member

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    Clapner. Just about everything he's ever recorded.
     
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  20. bloomz

    bloomz Member

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    U mean Urk? Urk Clampner?
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2015
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