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Mixing Woods

fenderbender4

Platinum Supporting Member
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2,483
I know people usually debate single vs. multiple piece bodies, but I was wondering what people's experiences have been in regards to multiple piece bodies, but mixed with different woods, beyond the usual maple top on mahogany.

The madcat guitar has such a weird construction (7 pieces, walnut middle strip, two top "wings" of maple, sen middle, and 2 back "wings" of maple again). Does it just kind of turn into a glorified "pickup mounting device" past a certain point? Or have people found tonal benefits?

I've also seen the rare guitar that, for example has a flamed maple top AND back and wondering how that compares to the usual lone maple top.

Thoughts?
 

vlammie

Member
Messages
1,275
On the mad cat mixing woods turned out really well. In general, compared to a 'regular' strat or tele, they have more hi-end, more low end and a bigger dynamic range.

I don't know if it's because the wood-mix, or if they just use really good pieces of wood, but it's something special for sure.

My '84 mad cat sounds very similar to a brand new one, although the pickups are completely different, so I guess this particular wood construction contributes a lot to the unique sound they have.
 

vlammie

Member
Messages
1,275
didn't Parker guitars use a lot of different woods inside, to shape the sound? And the they packed it in a plastic shell? I played on a really long time ago, but at the time they caused some waves.
 

fenderbender4

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
2,483
Firebirds were mahogany neck through with different wings weren't they?

Yeah I believe so. I know a lot of the guitars in the 80s had multiple piece bodies.

Always been curious about the *sandwich* type guitars. Like I'm curious how a maple top + mahogany body would differ (if at all) from a maple top + maple back + mahogany body.
 






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