Mods Please Sticky: The Best Interactive Fretboard on the Internet

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by GuitaristZ, Apr 4, 2008.

  1. GuitaristZ

    GuitaristZ Guest

    http://www.notesonstrings.com/

    I have looked for these sort of things on the net for a long time, and have found many.

    However, out of all of them that I have tried, this is absolutely the BEST.

    It has all the common scales, as well as modes and many many other scales and presents them in an easy to use fashion with a great looking simple interface.

    It even has the scale formulas!!!
     
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  2. Austinrocks

    Austinrocks Member

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    There are lots on these on the net, however have you learned the notes on the neck, I find these sorts of things really useless, a guitarist should know the notes by heart, and as long as they have a chart to refer to they never will. Its easy to learn the notes, just write them down a couple of times.

    I have the same attitude about chords, you really should know the notes in a chord and be able to form them automatically, a chord book or chord generator is useless as well, learn the chords and how they are constructed, understand how to use them in keys, that is what a guitarist should be able to do.
     
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  3. GuitaristZ

    GuitaristZ Guest

    yeah I know the notes on the neck, but somehow seeing them up there on the chart gives me new ideas usually...

    Good Lord...if you can remember them after a couple of times you must be superhuman lol...

    I have been trying to memorize all the modes of the major scale for a while now all over the neck and I am still trying to get them all fluent, so I can move around the neck effortlessly when improvising.
     
  4. Austinrocks

    Austinrocks Member

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    Your trying to play like I do, stop come up some other way. I a few patterns, Pentonic, Major and Minor, no modes or anything, I know them very well, but I don't use them, on a piano the modes come naturally out of the key. I know:

    Notes on the Guitar, from memory
    Chords and how to construct them, from memory
    Keys, from memory
    Pentatonic Scales, Major and Minor Scales, from memory I use those as fall backs if I need to.


    1) Draw out a fretboard, and fill in the notes open to 12 fret and know they repeat or all 22 frets if you have to, takes 5 minutes, do that a couple times and you should know the notes, throw the paper away, you want this information in your brain, not on a piece of paper.

    2) learn chords, use flash cards, being able to go past the 7th to the 9th, 11th or 13th is optional, but its easy to do if you can add 7. Knowing

    A is A C# E
    G is A B D
    E is E G# B
    D7 is D F# A C
    Bm9 is B D F# A C#

    automatically is what is important

    3) Learn keys, flash cards, if you have to, this will enable you to look at the chords and know what key its in.

    Chords are D A G, key of D, D has a F# A has a C# and natural E, only key that has that, its automatic for me.

    4) for moving around on the neck and playing modes, it not really playing modes it playing the notes where you are, if you need help the Pentatonics can be used in place of the modes, I will use them as safe notes, but I usually just play the notes where I am.

    I suggest you not worry about memorizing patterns, they don't get you anywhere, knowing the notes on the guitar, and knowing keys and chords, will get you better faster in the long run. Memorizing patterns just gets you as far as the pattern, I know people who are constantly looking for more patterns, 1000000000000000000000000 chords in a book or on a site, its awwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwweeeeeeeeeeeeeesoommmmeee.
    10000000000000 scales and patterns, its aaaaaaaaawwwwwwesome.

    Superman could remember all those patterns, I can not, I only know three. :horse
     
  5. lagomorphian

    lagomorphian Member

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  6. Austinrocks

    Austinrocks Member

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    Lagomorphian that is a great game if you know the fretboard its really easy. I am not sure that it really teaches the fretboard the way writting it down does, but it does show you if you know the fretboard or not.
     
  7. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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  8. Austinrocks

    Austinrocks Member

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  9. JonR

    JonR Member

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    A nicely designed site, yes. (There are lots like this, but this is one of the best I've seen.)

    But what I would do is print/copy out the chart for the C major scale - and maybe those for C, F and G chords too - learn that; then work out the rest for myself.
    (You need to know how to work out keys starting from C major, using the cycle of 5ths. Not hard.)

    This - some basic note information, plus some basic theory concepts, plus your own brainwork (and playing the stuff on the guitar of course!) - will help you learn and remember much quicker than always referring to a site.
     
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  10. thebowl

    thebowl Member

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    That statement is simply incorrect, and the fact that you believe it will prevent you from appreciating just how helpful this type of aid can be to people. You are projecting your own personal experience onto others.
     
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  11. cubistguitar

    cubistguitar Member

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    cool zombie thread, got me looking around for interactive fingerboard tools, there aren't that many worth looking at

    This one is very well illustrated and easy to look at , but I feel like it is limited to a few scales, no symmentrical scales, harmonic minor, melodic minor or modes thereof.

    The looknohands.chordhouse.com is very well done too, but has a ridiculous list of scales that often overlap and don't quite cover all the pertinent stuff, no harmonic major no augmented scale ( the one marked that is not the augmented scale and the "six tone symmnetrical" is the other mode of augmented) it has about 3 ways of describing altered scale, half whole diminished, whole tone, even pentatonic major is called "chinese mongolian", and the major scale is also "ethiopian" just a little confusing for those trying to sort the useful typical stuff from the truly "exotic". the chords are also incomplete no maj7b5 or maj7#11, no diminished major7, no slash chords.

    Just complaining cuz I can
     
  12. Sascha Franck

    Sascha Franck Member

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    With any such things you're adding an extra step between the fretboard and its note layout. One that will probably even become tough to get rid of.
    All you really need to know is the notenames of your empty strings and the chromatic scale.
    Then there's some helpers, such as JonR already mentioned. Some of which you may need to learn one day anyway.

    Seriously, I can't count it how often I had students relying on chord and scale diagrams. Often so much that they still had to look up the most simple things after years of playing.
    To me that is as inefficient and wasting resources as much as it gets.
     
  13. Tom Gilroy

    Tom Gilroy Member

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    I have a somewhat unusual approach to this, but it has helped me immensely and everybody who has tried it has found it very beneficial.

    I believe that regularly testing yourself is tremendously important when learning. Testing needs to be fully comprehensive. Testing ourselves effectively is difficult, because we often naturally gravitate to reinforcing what we already know. My solution is to introduce randomness.

    If you go to any hobby shop, they should have boxes of these:
    [​IMG]
    These as polyhedral dice. Geeks like me use them when playing tabletop role-playing games (eg. Dungeons & Dragons). A typical set contains dice with 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 20 sides (called d4, d6, etc). A set shouldn't cost more than a few dollars.

    There are many ways you can use these dice to help test your knowledge of the fretboard.

    One simple exercise use the d6 and d12 only.

    Decide upon your tuning (eg. standard tuning, DAGDAD, etc). Now, roll both dice. Let the number on the d6 be the string (from high to low), and let the number on the d12 be the fret. Find, name and play this note.

    Another exercise involves the d4, two d6 and d12. Decide your tuning and roll the dice.

    The number on the first d6 is the string and the d12 is the fret. The number on the second d6 represents chord type as follows

    1 or 2 -> Major 7th
    3 or 4 -> Minor 7th
    5 or 6 -> Dominant 7th.

    Finally, the number on the d4 represents the chord tones

    1 -> Root
    2 -> 3rd
    3 -> 5th
    4 -> 7th

    Find, name and play the note determined on the fretboard as before. This note is the specified chord tone of the specified chord. Name this chord. Find an inversion of this chord with the determines chord tone in the determines position.

    For example, in standard tuning, we roll a 3 on the d4, a 5 on the first d6, a 3 on the second d6 and an 8 on the d12. The specified note is therefore the 8th fret on the A string, which is an F. By the other dice, this is the 5th of a minor 7th chord. Name this chord, and play it with the fifth (F) in that position!

    You can easily expand the above example to include other chord types (diminished 7th, half diminished, etc), or you can develop your own games to test whatever you want to work on. As an idea, the d8 could be used to determine scale degrees, etc.

    You can do a lot of these tests without a guitar too.
     
  14. skydog

    skydog Supporting Member

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    How does someone post here as “Guest”?
     
  15. Jim Soloway

    Jim Soloway Supporting Member

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    Agreed. It will also provide a starting point and enough ammunition for your imagination to run wild for a really long time.
     
  16. Megatron

    Megatron Member

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    Guest comes in and Tells the moderators to make a sticky.
    Seems like spam to me.
     
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  17. Jim Soloway

    Jim Soloway Supporting Member

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    They don't. The status in a thread is current but the post is 9 years old
    It's a 9 year old thread. Member status in existing posts so he was probably a member at the time.
     
  18. Blix

    Blix Member

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    The 10-year old bump is spam too.
     
  19. skydog

    skydog Supporting Member

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    OK; who raised the dead?
     
  20. Blix

    Blix Member

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    A spammer which is banned now.
     

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