More Soloway content :D

Discussion in 'Member Video and Sound Clips' started by adamquek, Sep 10, 2005.

  1. adamquek

    adamquek Member

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    Hey guys I was just noodling around with Fly Me To The Moon and though I'd record a short clip of what I had just for fun. I think I was distortion the track a little bit though...

    Fly Me To The Moon
     
  2. Jim Soloway

    Jim Soloway Supporting Member

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    Adam, I'm just flabergasted at how far you've come in the last year. Parts of that were just wonderful.
     
  3. EricT

    EricT Member

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    That was beautiful! Excellent playing.
    I thought the tone was a tad sharp, though, was it straight to the board?
     
  4. adamquek

    adamquek Member

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    Hey Eric, that was the VG88 -> straight to my soundcard. I think I was overdriving something somewhere there's a hint of dirt that I can hear. I was using the VG88 for a JC120 simulation and a hint of reverb. Thanks for checking it out mand :D
     
  5. adamquek

    adamquek Member

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    Jim thanks again for all those kind words! I've been trying really hard for the last year to make good on the promise to myself that I would finally get around to playing jazz, and with the right tool in my hand, it's proved to be much more enjoyable :) I've also had lots of help from my guitar teacher back in Singapore. He's had tons of experience, and though I only see him a couple of times when I go back I come away with a wealth of musical ideas to think about, as well as music to listen to. I've listening to as much jazz as I can get my hands on and it's really helping me get everything down, although I know there's still miles and miles to go. Or as Larry Calrton would say.. Smiles and Smiles to go. That's certainly how it feels :D
     
  6. EricT

    EricT Member

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    It's mostly just different, I guess. I'm more used to the "traditional" hollowbody tone.
    But again, great playing! You've only been playing jazz for about a year?? :eek:
     
  7. adamquek

    adamquek Member

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    Hey Eric yeah it's been about a year now. It really sort of took off after I got the Soloway, before that I was dabbling but not getting anywhere at all :( I've been playing for a decade now, since the first time I picked up a guitar and playing a cranberries song up til now heh. I spent alot of time working on technique back in the day, so at least for the last year I haven't had to sit down and woodshed too much to be able to play the stuff I wanted to play. I got to spend alot more time learning some theory and trying to apply it to jazz standards and stuff. But the more I learn the more I realize how much I *don't* know, about feel, about tone, and about musicality. There's a long way to go yet, but good times are definitely ahead :D
     
  8. EricT

    EricT Member

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    I've played jazz for about a year as well, but don't really get anywhere, so now I've more or less given up on it. I feel like I don't have enough time to spend to get any real progress, it's really frustrating.
    Like you, I have fairly good technique and can learn stuff quickly, but I can't seem to get to where I can apply it naturally on a standard. And since I don't have much time to practice, I forget a lot between each time I sit down with the guitar.
    May I ask how your practice regime looks like?
     
  9. adamquek

    adamquek Member

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    I spent awhile learning how to play chords across groups of strings. I started with maj7, dom7, min7, m7b5 and diminsished chords across the DGBE strings, learning all the inversions. Then I moved the note on the high E to the low E to play them across the low E and the DGB strings. Then I did the same thing across the ADGB strings. While doing that I made sure to pay attention to which string was which interval for each chord

    E.g

    5 (3) 5 (3)
    5 (7) 4 (b7)
    5 (5) 5 (5)
    3 (r) 3 (r)
    x x
    x x

    FM7 F7 etc..

    That way whenever I saw a chord in a jazz standard I would already know it or quickly be able to figure out how to play it.

    After I got the chords down I spent a some time learning some standard progressions like I IV V, iii vi ii V I etc, then figured out how to play some of those progressions using different inversions to keep the voice movements close. I also dabbled in some chord substitution like for a maj7 you can substitute a m7 a major 3rd up or a minor 3rd down and vice versa, and sticking to those substitutions that I thought sounded nicer. I also figured spent some time figuring out how to use color tones (9s, 13s and all variations) over the chords.

    Figuring out the tritone substitution thing also helped alot in smoothing out the bass movements, to get some of that chromatic bassline stuff going on ie for any dominant 7th chord you can substitute a dominant 7th chord a tritone away (up or down doesn't matter since a triton divides an octave exactly in half and you get the same note). Then I applied that to secondary dominants.

    I also spent some time looking at jazz standards and grouping sections into common progressions, so I could see where the modulations were, and tried to figure out how I could continue to play over thoe changes without running around the fretboard too much.

    I tried to learn a couple of jazz solos and looked at them to figure out how they worked over the changes, and tried to incorporate some leading tone stuff to get some of the chromatic stuff going on.

    Quite honestly I totally turned my back on the stuff I used to play for about 6 months.. no distortion, just clean tone and learning some standards and trying to learn theory and see how it apply it by learning some jazz standards. I quite liked the Jobim stuff so I used Girl From Ipanema, How Insensitive and Waters of March to try and apply all of the above, learning the chords and inversions and everything. I listened to as much jazz as I could get my hands on and tried to imitate cool ideas that I heard. The more I learnt, the more I realized how much there was to learn and how much I really didn't know.. that really helped motivate me and keep it interesting :D It was really hard a first because I was totally out of my comfort zone.. I had to stop ripping through progressions by running around scales, and that was painful because I felt retarded for awhile... it really made me realize how little I knew and how my technique totally dictated my playing style and choice of notes. But after about a month things started to fall into place and it was much easier to enjoy the process. I had some really, really good guidance from my guitar teacher. I don't see him very often because we're not in the same country but basically whenever I go back home I pay him a visit and he just turns me on to so many new musical ideas that I gathered enough momentum to spend the next 6 months working on new stuff and exploring things.

    These days I mostly just continue to do that stuff. Learn some standards, learn some licks, try and copy those licks and write my own stuff, transpose things to different keys, etc. Keep at it man, it really pays off! I think I've now reached a place musically where I'm really content, not with my playing, but with how much I enjoy playing and learning about new things. If you want, I can hook you up with some of the material I have. Some of it is on paper but if you want I can photocopy it for you and mail it to you :D
     
  10. adamquek

    adamquek Member

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    I forgot to add... a funny side effect of all this has been that not only have I been listening to alot of jazz but I've been listening to a lot of stuff that I used to think was "beneath me" because I was too metal :p These days I'll listen to anything from hip-hop (Lil Jon is kinda funny.. and some of those Usher songs are digustingly catchy) to Pop (I love Sting and Tatu!), classical, fusion, world music, eletronica etc. I like to keep a much more open mind musically and somehow I've just really learnt to enjoy all sorts of music. I still do have preferences for certain types of music, but I find that I can listen to almost anything and find something to learn from it. It's not really all about jazz at the end of the day... to me it's all about music, and there's tons of it out there that I've yet to discover :D
     
  11. ivers

    ivers Member

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    Sounding great there, man. Really liked some of the solutions in the chord melody arrangement! Tone sounded difficult to work with though.
     
  12. EricT

    EricT Member

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    Thanks for sharing, Adam, I really appreciate it!
    It seems like we've been working on pretty much the same stuff, good to know I'm not way off...:)

    And I've experienced exactly the same as you with regards to other types of music! I used to hate "simple" music, i.e. pretty much anything that didn't have 5 time signature shifts and 15 insanely complicated riffs in every song..:)
    Now I have a much broader and more mature musical taste, and I think listening to jazz is what started it. Especially the importance of time feel suddenly got a lot clearer by playing jazz.

    Just one more thing. You said you "had to stop ripping through progressions by running around scales", does that mean that your soloing is based mostly around chords and apreggios? That would make sense since you've spent a lot of time figuring out the chords in all their inversions all over the fingerboard. I'm a sucker for scales and scale patterns...:eek:
    Here's one of my clips if you want to listen: There will never be another you
    This is mostly arranged, though(and heavily influenced by Kenny Burrell's version..), I'd like to be able to pull this stuff off just off the cuff.

    Thanks for the offer about lesson material, but I have waaay too much material to absorbe already:) I have a habit of buying books just to quickly skim through them and then put them away...
     
  13. azgolfer

    azgolfer Member

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    I think a big mistake that I made was approaching things from a scale perspective. By the time you think of what chord it is, what scale that is, and where you are on the neck, it's too late. I think if you learn chords all the way up down and across the neck, and you learn a little lick that goes with each chord, that works pretty well. Band in a box has a package called 101 essential jazz licks that is very helpful also. You can change the key and slow the tempo down, and it even has a fretboard graphic that will show you where the notes are being played.
     
  14. adamquek

    adamquek Member

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    Hey Eric that was a really nice take! I enjoyed that, classic mellow tone heh.

    I still do think of scales, sometimes it's just fun to throw in a little scale run here and there but like any other music technique, it's just one tool in my bag of tricks and I try and use it appropriately. When it comes to scales I try and think of what the intervals are for each mode to figure out what are the tones of the mode that really give it that flavour, so when I'm using it over a chord I can target those notes to bring out the flavour of the mode over the chord.

    One nice concept I was taught is what my teacher called chord specific pentatonics. You take the r 2 3 5 7 and make a 2 note per string shape ouf of it. This way, when you play over the chord with it you will hit all the chord tones plus the 9. You can take that concept and apply it to any chord by altering the respective intervals, and I really like the way the 9 sounds as well :D

    I also came across a Robben Ford thing where he plays r 3 4 5 6, pretty much the same concept incorporating the 13th as well. I try and mix that up with straight arpeggios, octave type melodies and some scale sequence stuff, as well as just with melodic ideas.

    Larry Carlton has this cool "improvise and imitate" approach where he comes up with a phrase and imitates himself but changing a note here and there or the dynamics or something.

    I know Joe Pass tries to learn a "scale" for every chord he knows in the same position as he would play those chords, so his hand positions for comping and soloing don't really change, that's another cool idea as well heh.

    Ultimately I think scales, patterns and arpeggios are valuable tools, but what's really going to make something sound right is a sense of conviction when it's played. Partly in the execution ie: picking purposefully, partly in the choice of notes ie: Here's a little melodic idea/movement/lick, and then stringing it all together. The last part, I'm sure, will take more than a lifetime :(
     

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