music studio re-arrangement - drum placement, flooring materials?

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by -alex, Feb 28, 2015.

  1. -alex

    -alex Silver Supporting Member

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    I have a chance to completely re-arrange and somewhat remodel my basement studio space. I removed the old flooring and am now down to bare concrete.

    The room is about 13x24 sq ft. I need to put in some new flooring over the concrete, but want to maximize ceiling height. It is an old house with just a 7 ft ceiling in the basement. The floor is almost flat except one corner, opposite of the door, which rises about 1 inch. I don't want to completely level the floor and lose that inch of height.

    I'm thinking about using interlocking carpet tiles to cover the floor, anyone have any experience with this sort of product?

    The studio gear is fairly a basic setup for a 4 piece band. PA, a couple monitors, amps, mixing/recording console. I use it mostly for rehearsal with a little bit of recording.

    I've had a few different arrangements over the years, but I'm thinking of putting the drums in the corner, building a small riser to hide the slope in the floor, and bring the drummer up about 6 inches - she is short so might even help.

    Does anyone have experience with a corner setup? How about building risers?
     
  2. zwolf

    zwolf Member

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    I'll be remodeling a similar basement in an old house, but this is still several years down the road. My main idea at this point re: flooring is to polish, seal and paint the existing concrete slab floor. And then place some nice accent rugs. This looks classy (IMO), give a bit of "liveness" to the sound - controlled of course by well paced rugs/bass traps/etc - and leaves you with maximum headroom.
     
  3. -alex

    -alex Silver Supporting Member

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    I've been thinking of that option too.

    It seems like a great way to go, I need to do a moisture transmission test to see if it is a viable option.
     
  4. stratrat2000

    stratrat2000 Member

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    Bare concrete is too reflective and carpets tend to deaden only a few frequencies too much, leaving others to build up.

    The usual way to approach it properly is to lay down a hardwood floor and use a few rugs where needed for kit, amps, etc.. Then put in some absorption panels below the ceiling to avoid flutter echoes between floor and ceiling. The wood floor is durable, cleanable and above all, sounds good.
     
  5. Rex Anderson

    Rex Anderson Member

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    Most recording studios you see have hardwood floors. It looks good and is better for acoustics than carpet which is a non-linear absorber. Really not much difference in concrete vs hardwood-they both reflect sound. Room treatment goes on the walls and ceiling to absorb and diffuse.
     
  6. -alex

    -alex Silver Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the input.

    Hardwood floors are generally a bad idea in basements. It seems like there might be a market for tonewood floors!
     
  7. jazzguitar14

    jazzguitar14 Supporting Member

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    I used those cheap laminate tiles with area rugs on top. Tiles applied direct to concrete.

    It was cheap and easy
    Doesn't look bad at all

    Best part has been the durability! Im always sliding a piano or Hammond console across the room and these tiles take the punishment -- and they slide real easy too. when its dirty just sweep or vac and your done...

    I cannot comment on ideal room acoustics, but this solution worked in my situation.
     
  8. OctalSocket

    OctalSocket Member

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    I love wooden floors, but as other people have said, they are a no-go in basements.

    The other thing with wood floors is that after a while, they all seem to squeak. Not what you want in a recording room.

    I did the vinyl tile on concrete. I would do it again in a second.
     
  9. gearscrubs

    gearscrubs Supporting Member

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    We just redid our basement floor with interlocking vinyl plank. Durable, water-resistant (just in case), easy to clean, looks better than bare concrete, etc. I haven't set up the drum kit in this new space yet, so I can't speak to the acoustics of the floor for recording, but I would expect it to be slightly less reflective than the concrete, but much livelier than carpet.
     
  10. -alex

    -alex Silver Supporting Member

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    The interlocking vinyl planks look good. I can add in area rugs to smooth out the sound, I'll need a protective layer for the drum kit anyway.
     
  11. rangerkarlos

    rangerkarlos Member

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    Big ass carpet remnant that was roughly the right size

    Lots of sites for theatre platform construction
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2015
  12. dmw319

    dmw319 Member

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    I have a very similar setup in my basement. I used carpet tiles 2'x2' and they worked great. Then put an area rug over top of that for looks and added cushion and warm feel for the room. Then I just ordered some sound absorption panels last night for the walls and ceiling. I just wish bass traps were not so expensive!
     
  13. treeofpain

    treeofpain Supporting Member

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    I suggest 2'x2' carpet squares and modular pressure sensitive adhesive (Enpress PSA or equivalent). Easy and cheap.

    The other comments are correct - you will not get a lot of room treatment from carpet, but it is easy to install, forgiving in the raised area of the floor, and easy to replace if something gets messed up - stains, rips, etc. (Be sure to buy a few extra squares for replacement later on).
     
  14. Crowder

    Crowder Dang Twangler Silver Supporting Member

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    The latest iterations of peel-n-stick vinyl tiles aren't bad at all. They're very thin. There's a recommended underlayment of dense foam that is about 1/4" thick with a very stick backing. I used this stuff in a basement bathroom, and when we eventually replaced it with ceramic, the tile guy had a helluva time getting it all off the concrete. That suggests it would be durable for a long time if left in place.
     
  15. stratrat2000

    stratrat2000 Member

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    Make your own with some rigid fibreglass. Relatively inexpensive and performs really well.
     
  16. dmw319

    dmw319 Member

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    actually watched a youtube video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TUlW6BenyWg) on this last night. I might try it!
     

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