My soloing goes no where, where to start?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Tyger, Jul 17, 2011.

  1. Neer

    Neer Supporting Member

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    Start transcribing solos from records before you go buying books and DVDs. I would recommend starting with Charlie Christian solos. Just get started with it, doing maybe 3 or 4 solos note-for-note. this should open up some pathways for you. Don't worry about the style and the fact that it's "old"--just do it.

    I would recommend transcribing Rose Room first:

     
  2. Jeremy_Green

    Jeremy_Green Member

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    You don't need books brother, ya gotta fix this one! Get yourself a slow downer software program like Transcribe! and get to work on it. You will take longer looking for a shortcut. Lifting is the key to your problem and work avoidance will get you nowhere.

    I actually did a blog post on this, maybe it will help you:
    http://sixstringobsession.blogspot.com/2011/07/from-noodling-to-music-learning-how-to.html

    Good luck!
     
  3. Samsun19

    Samsun19 Member

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    I agree...

    Its all about the EAR.

    But, I suggest starting very simply.... Cop things you know by heart that are stupid simple, like the melodies, Happy Birthday, cartoon riffs like the Pink Panther, etc... do several of those, then pic several cool classic guitar riffs, like Day Tripper. Then pick easiest solo's to cop..... Preferably with slower tempos, and cleaner tones.... Distortion/echo/chorus can muddle up the tones.....

    Learning anything by ear is FUN, and you will come away with a real sense of pride each time you figure something out.
     
  4. JimGtr

    JimGtr Member

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    +1.
     
  5. tbeale

    tbeale Member

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    I say it's a bit of everything. You want to build a library of phrases you can connect together to fit whatever you're trying to build musically. If you find yourself playing the same phrases over and over, it's time to start dissecting someone else's phrases and reference some tabs or watching videos. Usually I'll get one or two new phrases out of this. Other times it's just finding or recording a good rhythm track to play over and try connecting the phrases I do know in different ways.

    It seems I go through a cycle - I get in a rut, manage to get out or it, but the day I think I've really got it nailed is usually the day before I find myself in a rut again.
     
  6. IGuitUpIGuitDown

    IGuitUpIGuitDown Member

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    And try to learn entire songs, if you can remember all of them. Even if you know a few notes of the bass line where the guitar drops out, you can keep adding more, over time, until you're playing all of the bass solo and the guitar parts, too.

    The Pink Panther theme, the James Bond theme, the Barney Miller theme - I remember trying to find all of those at one point. And what's really fun is when you can find the correct chords or notes by ear, that others have missed. That's a real sense of getting somewhere. I had to relearn most of what was taught to me by friends - it just wasn't right. I was one of the only guys in my circle who figured out the Rush "Freewill" studio solo, just by playing a cassette tape of it over and over, until it actually broke! And all of my friends wanted to know what the secret of playing it was...

    ...I listened to it until I could sing it back to you, without the recording.

    I'd wager that all of us on here have gone back and reworked songs we thought we knew, but then realized there was more than we were playing. That's a truth about playing guitar - revisiting the material you think you know, and really getting it down. Sometimes that works best when you play it in a band, because you realize something is missing - and it just might be something you're not playing, but should be.
     
  7. IGuitUpIGuitDown

    IGuitUpIGuitDown Member

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  8. Baminated

    Baminated Member

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    It's not sad, because you have answered honestly !

    I would focus on the slowhand, melodic players - particularly David Gilmour.
    David's soloing is melodic, thematic, and not chops oriented - all of his solos take you on a trip.

    In this order:
    Shine On You Crazy Diamond
    Time
    Comfortably Numb
    Another Brick In The Wall
    Mother
    Dogs

    An easier device to use that transcribe is the Boss Micro BR

    You can slow down to any % w/o changing pitch and set loop points.

    If you can read notation, learn the heads to jazz standards & classical themes out of the fakebooks all over the neck in different fingerings/ocatve ranges
     
  9. RichardB

    RichardB Senior Member

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    Right on Mike....it is amazing to me how many pretty "advanced" musicians can play the sh!t out of it, but can't construct a coherent solo that has a shape....it's actually more common to see shapeless solos than ones w/ an "arc"...
     
  10. tbeale

    tbeale Member

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    Solos are kind of like a dance, where the partners separate then embrace briefly for a few bars before separating again. There are points where the solo reconnects to the melody (usually where the chords change?) and weaves around the structure of the chord progressions. Also hitting the off notes, like the 7ths or 2nds that make that key chord somehow different and makes a particular song unique. I heard a quote once about a great guitarist: "It's not that he played a lot of notes, but he always played the right notes".
     
  11. SmokeyJacks

    SmokeyJacks Member

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    Try creating a solo without the guitar. for example, sing a solo (however simple you want) over the progression. Then try to emulate that solo with the guitar. Sing a new solo...transcribe to guitar. repeat.
     
  12. tbeale

    tbeale Member

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    I like that idea
     
  13. senseofrelief

    senseofrelief Senior Member

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    A great guitar solo starts with attitude.....your on stage with Ynqwie, he's curled up in a ball at your feet sucking his thumb, so you rest your foot on his back like a conquered beast....girls are throwing panties up on the stage, your tone is grail, your playing is awesome...you haven't finished your solo yet, and Rolling Stone is already moving yours up to the top of the all time list.

    As the crowd cheers, you look out of the corner of your eye to see your roadies picking out the very choicest of hot chicks in the audience....who then start fighting with the three Playmates you have back stage...

    Life is awesome. Your fingers are the ticket to another world, and your taking everyone there with you.

    :)
     
  14. rhinocaster

    rhinocaster Member

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    Wow, this is the same imagery suspended member Johns7022 used to describe his vision of the on stage conquest! You have a twin in your own town! ;)

    "I always got off on lead guitar playing being a combat sport: Crushing the other guitar player with my playing. I can't think of anything better then to be up on stage with Ynqwie, who's now at my feet, sucking his thumb in the fetal position, completely demoralized, his spirit crushed....and as I rest my foot on his back, Capt. Morgan fashion, I continue my epic solo, laughing at how easy it was to take him down...another dilettante for the grinder...the crowd goes nuts, there is growing pile of girls panties being thrown up on stage....epic."
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2011
  15. EricPeterson

    EricPeterson Member

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    What? Who doesn't fantasize about Panties and Ynqwie? :cool:
     
  16. gennation

    gennation Member

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    Hey Tyger...best thing to do when you have an idea of what you want to do is to start right at the top of your list...

    start learning Roadhouse Blues.

    IOW, if you want to learn something note for note, it's best to start at the first note, then move to the second, then the third, etc...make sense?

    Learn the chords/rhythm pieces so you see the structure. Then pick out some of Jim's vocal lines, then move onto some of the leads.

    Just start right at the top and try to learn everything about the tune, even the bass line...remember the bass line can show you all about the tune pretty quickly as far as where things are, what's moving where, and how it gets there. It can lead you beyond just knowing what scale to play in.

    Start small, just take that tune from the beginning. Even if you don't learn the whole thing you will be able to learn a lot of it and those things you do learn are going to be beneficial in the big picture as well as show you how to continually learn more things by ear and internally.
     
  17. whenrealityhurts

    whenrealityhurts Member

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    Best advice I can give you is to find an instructor who can actually solo...everyone has advice...few post up their music, and few instructors can actually play...

    Just keep looking...
     
  18. Tyger

    Tyger Member

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    Like I said before, I can't really afford a teacher right now. I had an excellent teacher, who I am sure I will resume lessons with in the future, but all I can really do is study at home right now.
     
  19. EricPeterson

    EricPeterson Member

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    This post gives me such a SENSE OF RELIEF ...
     
  20. 9fingers

    9fingers Supporting Member

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    A simple start would be to add some punctuation to your phrases some commas some periods some looonng pauses for breath some faster parts some slower parts some louder parts some softer parts if i just keep on playing notes without any thought of dynamics or punctuation it becomes a big run-on sentence like this post imagine how much better this post would be with some actual punctuation and do the same with your solos.
     

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