My Taylor and feedback.............

Discussion in 'Acoustic Instruments' started by Blueswede, Apr 19, 2005.

  1. Blueswede

    Blueswede Gold Supporting Member

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    Maybe someone can shed some light for me. ..... I"m currently using my Taylor 710CE in my band doing an acoustic set. It has the Fishman Blender and I play it through a Strawberry Blond. The problem is that I seem to get a lot of feedback if I get too close to the monitor. A lot of high pitched squeals...........What can I do to fix this? Is it the pickups in the guitar? Someone mentioned a cover for the soundhole. Anyone out there use one of these? Suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks. Steve
     
  2. Scott Peterson

    Scott Peterson Staff Member

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    What you are experiencing is the bane of every acoustic musician trying to fit into a loud band. In a solo or duo it is never a problem usually, with a loud band.... always.

    Been there man, more than you know.

    Soundhole covers do help; they don't cure it, but they do help. You can get them in black rubber to fit, less than $10.

    You can notch it out with EQ, you can reverse phase.

    Or you can find another solution.

    It truly is nature of the beast.
     
  3. Blueswede

    Blueswede Gold Supporting Member

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    Thanks for the great info, Scott. Hard to understand, because when I play acoustic, the rest of the band is a lot quieter than when I'm playing electric. And the other guitar player never seems to have the same problem, and he plays mostly acoustic in most of our songs. It seems to be a problem limited to me and my guitar. And he has the same amp. But his is sitting on a stand and mine is on the floor. Not sure if that would make a difference. I'll try the soundhole cover and try to EQ it better.
     
  4. Johnny Raz

    Johnny Raz Member

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    I'm with Scott on this one -- get the rubber soundhole cover and it will cut back on the feedback quite a bit for under $10.00 -- I use mine all the time. Of course, the ultimate solution is to get an Anderson Crowdster (if you have $2k or so lying around). A cheaper alternative to the Crowdster is the Turner Renaissance.

    Notch filters can be expensive, and may not be very effective, IMHO.
     
  5. Scott Peterson

    Scott Peterson Staff Member

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    Get your amp up off the floor and move around to find the "sweet spot" where you won't feedback. That helps a lot too.

    My end solution was the Line 6 Variax 700 Acoustic. It's been a year now and I am exceptionally happy with that decision. One highlight? Absolutely NO feedback no matter what. It is quite a pleasure.
     
  6. waxnsteel

    waxnsteel Member

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    1. The Strawberry Blonde will never sound as good as the PA with your Taylor. I have several dual source Taylor's. 3 of the Fishman's and an LR Baggs, AND I have a Strawberry Blonde, too. Skip the amp, Go direct.

    2. Use the instruction manual that came with your Taylor for the Blender. It basically has you start out with the Slider for blend ALL THE WAY to the mic side. The only eq controls that affect the microphone are the notch, and the contour. Most of my guitars have the notch around 3 O'clock, the frequency for the contour all the way up (10k I think?) and the gain almost all the way down for the contour (slider at about -10). Then flip the phase back and forth, and see which way you like it best. Now EQ from the board to make that sound as pleasing as possible. Remember this sound. There are some holes in it because the very sensitive microphone inside your guitar must be drastically EQ'd to get any good sound from it, but it does add to the "realness" of your sound with this system.
    NOW, slide the blend fader toward the pickup side. ALL THE WAY. Remember those holes? Fill them back up with the signal from the Piezo. I usually end up with the Bass and Treble Faders ALL THE WAY up. Then I slide the blendd fader back near the middle, but favoring the pickup just a little more. The microphone is most likely the source of your feedback. Give it a try.
     
  7. waxnsteel

    waxnsteel Member

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    Oh yeah, those soundhole covers will help fight feedback, but in my experience, makes the axe sound thinner. YMMV
     
  8. Funky Chicken

    Funky Chicken Member

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    Going direct will probably get you most of the way there.
     
  9. screamtone

    screamtone Supporting Member

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    I use an LR Baggs Para Acoustic DI. It has a phase switch, notch filter and and sweepable mid. Between that and a feedback buster in the soundhole, you can kill just about any frequency that's taking off. You can pick them up on Ebay for less than $100US. Ditto the previous statements about losing the amp. Unless you have absolutely no monitors, they're more trouble than they're worth IMO. I've also had good luck in the past with Sabine Feedback Exterminators.
     
  10. Taller

    Taller Silver Supporting Member

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    Anywhere is everywhere and nowhere is nothing.
    I have no personal experience with this partuicular device, but they look much nicer than the rubber sound hole thingies:
    Lute Hole
     

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