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Mysterious scratch on guitar. Seething with rage. Anyone else relate?

rockon1

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
12,753
Not to be preachy or diminish your sense of frustration but, adopting a regular meditation practice works wonders on a suffering mind and I can't recommend it highly enough. I can relate, to a point, with what your going through as I have similar patterns of emotional dysregulation in me that are slowly diminishing over time through getting help, lots of work, and patience.

There's a story I read once about a guy encountering a hermit monk living alone in the mountains somewhere - after the traveler was invited in for tea, he noticed that the cup was made of the finest China he'd ever seen. Noticing that the traveler was being very careful with the cup the monk said quickly, "Don't worry, it's already broken..." (even though it was perfectly intact, ya see... ;) ).

With all that being said I've found Meguiars Ultimate Compound to work wonders if the scratches aren't too deep!

Yeah its difficult to talk of such things without feeling or seeming preachy. I get it though. My sense of "wellness" depends entirely upon my perception/telationship with the present moment. The practice of stopping , of just being, of what one might call conciousness training, mindfulness training helps break my prerpetual habit of being dragging downstream in the raging rapids of my own thought processes. In doing so maybe a shift occurs without even realizing it. To stop, watch my thoughts, so simple, so not easy! I feel its well worth the effort but thats just my opinion. Also misunderstood. Its not mystical, magical, a new belief system, or anything like that.
 

Bobsessed

Member
Messages
54
Dings and scratches used to make me crazy. At 63, I'm over it. I can tell you where and how almost every blemish was made on my 1980 Hamer special. At age 23, a scratch on my new guitar would infuriate me. Today, not so much. They're memories. One particular lacquer chip came from the mistake of a dear departed friend, and that always reminds me of him....not a bad thing. As long as it's me making the damage, it's just okay. It's honest wear, and history, even if only I know it.
 

Jim234

Member
Messages
1,093
Yeah the first ding is a pain the arse. I picked one up on the headstock of guitar I really liked when the drummer hit his cymbal hard and the headstock of the guitar was in the way... my fault. I looked at that ding for ages, then got another and stopped caring. A guitar is meant to used and it will degrade over the time. Unless you are a collector who speculates, then I don't see the point in case queens. In fact it's a bit sad that a guitar sits in its box when there are people out there who could make good use of it.
 

CDP

Member
Messages
784
I consider scratches to be "character stripes". I'm very careful with all of my guitars and things still can and do happen. They distinguish my guitars from the other 10,000 that Tom Anderson, Music Man and Taylor built.

**** happens, move on and enjoy the guitar.
 

Ferg Deluxe

Double Platinum Member
Messages
2,078
...the first scratch literally makes me so mad I almost want to smash the things. How do you guys deal with getting dings/scratches in your guitars? I realize I am overreacting here, but I'm just so bloody angry at myself for scratching it. Keep in mind that I don't even wear belts or clothing with zippers or metal buttons. I put on pajamas or soft clothing and sit on a chair in the middle of the room and make sure not to bump anything. Getting the guitar ready to play is even difficult for me. I have a new Les Paul and a Gretsch Duo Jet and I won't even play either of them because I don't want to scratch them, so I play guitars that already have scratches.

Seriously, am I totally nuts about this? Does anyone relate?
I would have chosen not to comment, but since you're asking for input...

It's one thing to be "fussy" about something. Literally everyone is fussy about something. But letting a scratch lead you into a seething rage? Take it from this old dude, that's no way to live a life. At some point in the future you'll be taking stock of things, and I bet that you'll regret not playing music more than you'll regret having put a scratch on a guitar. Scratches are literally nothing. Everything will get scratched. As Joe Sumner said, "Everything will never be okay."

So what are you going to do? You can't keep everything safe all the time, and stuff is going to break. Including you. You can fix a scratch, but you'll never get back the time wasted from being angry at scratches, and you can't backfill the past with music you never made.

My advice would be to talk to someone. Because every single second that ticks by, where you aren't able to pick up a guitar and feed your soul, is a second you'll never get back no matter how many guitars you managed to keep unscathed.
 

dumdums

Member
Messages
59
I would have chosen not to comment, but since you're asking for input...

It's one thing to be "fussy" about something. Literally everyone is fussy about something. But letting a scratch lead you into a seething rage? Take it from this old dude, that's no way to live a life. At some point in the future you'll be taking stock of things, and I bet that you'll regret not playing music more than you'll regret having put a scratch on a guitar. Scratches are literally nothing. Everything will get scratched. As Joe Sumner said, "Everything will never be okay."

So what are you going to do? You can't keep everything safe all the time, and stuff is going to break. Including you. You can fix a scratch, but you'll never get back the time wasted from being angry at scratches, and you can't backfill the past with music you never made.

My advice would be to talk to someone. Because every single second that ticks by, where you aren't able to pick up a guitar and feed your soul, is a second you'll never get back no matter how many guitars you managed to keep unscathed.
THAT is a great post, man. Wow. Thank you. That was perfectly written.
 

xmd5a

Member
Messages
2,286
I hate scratches because I really like smooth, mirror-like poly. I also like natural and oil finishes, but the fact is most guitars on the market have a poly coat, which I love the look of, but if it gets a scratch, or worse, a crack, it looks like crap after that. The fact is, a clean poly finish look really nice, no amount of Jedi mind tricks will change that fact.

I've been working on buffing out scratches, but it's often not an easy endeavor, for various reason. If the scratch is really deep, you'd have to sand the body and then buff it. Some guitars are a layer of poly/paint/poly, so if you sand or buff too far, you go right past the paint and you're looking at the wood, and then you're really screwed, what started as removing scratches is now a significant blemish that is not easily repaired. If the repair process were a lot easier, it wouldn't be a big deal. Water-based poly is a very promising material for rapid repair, but it's still far from easy.

Instead of worked out ways to not risk scratching my guitars, such as watching what I wear, how the guitars are stored, and purposely buying cheapo guitars that I can play harder and risk scratching, but it shouldn't have to be that way.
 

Laurence

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
8,151
I don't mind scratches and dents from actual playing, to be honest they're kind of cool to me. But a mistake in putting a guitar away or letting it fall accidentally does bother me a little bit, but I get over it.

When my kids were young I'd pick a sturdy guitar (it was always a Fender or Yamaha) to bang on. No problems, no issues. I did the same thing with the grandkids. "Here, make music or noise on this".

The one 'ding' that hurt the most was on a Fender offset that I was putting on a stand but accidentally banged it against a square metal leg of a chair. It took out a nice junk of finish and dented the guitar deeply. I thought to myself, "well, I'm an a$$hole". And then I thought, "well, there's the first big one".

I've a deep gash in the top of a parlor guitar that wasn't there when I bought it (used) and I don't know how it got there. Life goes on.
 

Jimbo99

Member
Messages
235
$200? Have you ever spent more than that on a guitar in the past. I've been playing for 36 years and the stuff we had in the 80s that wasn't a USA-made Fender, Gibson, Jackson, Charvel, etc was pretty much crap. These days, you can buy really nice import guitars for $400-800. I've owned many $4K+ guitars and there are definitely diminishing returns once you get over the $1K price point. My Korean Ltds were easily 80% plus of my Japanese ESPs, as were my Korean PRS SEs to my USA PRS', and my import Schecter Nick Johnson to my Schecter USA traditional. I do find there to be a bigger gap between Epiphones and Gibsons, but still... I've had a few Epi LPs that weren't all that far off from my Gibson LPs (my '56 "gold" top Epi in candy red is as beloved as my U.S. and CS LPs for instance). Anyways... if you haven't owned a $500-1,000 instrument... I HIGHLY recommend doing so at least once. There is a vast difference between a $200 guitar and a $1K guitar. After that, the curve starts to level off a bit. I will admit that the difference between low end and medium electrics is far less pronounced (assuming a good set of pickups is installed), than the difference in acoustics between the levels. The sub-$1K acoustics have made massive improvements from the water-logged, dead planks they used to be. But the difference in quality of tone betweem a $500 acoustic and a $2K one has been like night and day. I've seen brands like Breedlove, Guild, and Yamaha narrow that gap big time over the past 5-10 years.

Anyways... sorry for the thread derail... I just wanted to encourage anyone who hasn't owned at least one mid or high level instrument to treat themselves to the right one (for them) eventually.
Nope, I have a 2017 Epiphone LP Special I P90, a 2005 Squier Bullet SSS HT Strat, a 2016 Squier Affinity SSS Trem Strat & a 2011 Applause by Ovation AE128. Everything pre-owned except the Epiphone. I guess there was a day when the Ovation was a $ 300 MSRP acoustic. The rest of them ranged from $ 149-229 MSRP, but since they were pre-owned & a year prior to COVID lockdown home incarceration I paid very little for them. With a set up, a chance to adjust to that and the new environment and some playing in, they're pretty awesome instruments. Every now & then I do go to a music store & handle a higher end instrument, some are better others are no better than what I have. I guess they could be better if they were set up to my liking ? Maybe that's why I don't get one. They never feel as comfiortable as what I have. They probably are better, I just don't want to drop that kind of money and still end up putting in the set up effort.
 

rkharper

Member
Messages
979
I have a fairly new Gretsch Duo Jet, and one day, there was a chunk of paint missing on the lower bout, and I really take care of my guitars, no idea how that happened, might have been my 2 year old boy.
Anyway, I tried fixing it myself with black dye and superglue, drop fill fix like on the stewmac video on youtube. It's not perfect, but better than before.

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Attachments

Morpeli

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
468
Try this it works!


and then recite:

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference.
 

OldPicker

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
38
It's been a couple of weeks now, so I've been wondering how are you doing?
Have you tried the scratch remover that Morpeli posted?
I'm wondering if it's available and how well it works.
You said ...
so I play guitars that already have scratches.
So have you been playing this guitar now?
How is it's tone?
What do you like about this guitar?
Is it going to be a player?
Cheers!
 

vortexxxx

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,228
The rage happens if I know who did it and they didn't bother mentioning it to me. I have to decide if I still want to be nice or get some sort of revenge.
 

Attuned2U

Member
Messages
21
I wish there were more people who would mention the negative side of sobriety for some people. I swear I was a way cooler person when I drank. Haha. The man I am now is....lesser than the one before. Sharper, for sure, but also colder and not as able to enjoy things. Sense of humour is not as strong as it was. After 9 months, I'd say that I can barely remember what it was like to relax. I take everything so seriously it's ridiculous. Not to sway this too far from the topic, but I figure lots of musicians drink for similar reasons. It's amazing what the creative process is like now. Very analytical and less about being moved emotionally by the music. The viewpoints espoused by many in this thread - namely that guitars get scratches - were views that I shared a few months ago. When I drank. Haha. We always hear about obnoxious drunks....what about all the obnoxious sober people?

It's true that I have no friends or social life to speak of, so that probably fuels my obsession with my guitars. They're really all I have to care about. I don't really want it to be that way, but I suck at talking to people, so, guitars it is.

BTW, I just ordered a used 1970s AVRI stratocaster. All black with rosewood fretboard. Now my Two-Rock can really shine. Needed a stratocaster.

Again, thanks for all the posts, guys. I am glad I have this forum.
Hey there,
Take it easy on yourself, you're not the first to go through this, and certainly not the last, fact.
You're experiencing what most of us "musicians" have gone through. It's a weird contradiction to be sure. There are some surprisingly acceptable things about using a little of this or that, as long as you keep it under control, fact... When you are young, you start drinking, for the fun of it and because "everyone" does it. Except most of us can't really handle it in the long run. I am in no place to preach, having been addicted to just about everything in the world..:), if you're anything less than Superman, it is better in the long run to just leave it alone, but if you are the one off type guy, and can learn to handle it instead of letting it handle you, it doesn't have to be that way. Unfortunately, the truth is if you are like 98% of us, you probably won't handle it. It is what it is, my friend. I can't say I quit and never fell back, but I'm still here despite the health problems I have, directly caused by too much alcohol. Best to stay away from it, or accept the consequences. Life doesn't suck, just the crap that happens. Be well, stay healthy. Peace.
 

xmd5a

Member
Messages
2,286
Try this it works!


and then recite:

God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference.
That seems suspicious. Any scratch remover that works well on poly or lacquer alike will work on much more that guitars alone. I bet its just automotive product rebranded and marked up.
 




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