>~ MysToury Box Review Repository~<

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by Don Rusk, Aug 24, 2005.

  1. Don Rusk

    Don Rusk Biggus Bearfootus Vendor

    Messages:
    6,979
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Location:
    St. Louis
    This is a thread to place Reviews of MysToury Boxes so others can easily avoid reading them while waiting to recieve the box....

    Communication about the boxes will continue on the original thread (link below)


    Some direction on reviews:

    The more context the better: include guitars/amps-speakers/cords/audition space-situation information etc...

    Since you wont know the maker or model when reviewing, comparisons to other models you do own are encouraged.....

    also include parameters like dynamics, compression,distortion,eq~ frequency range etc....

    Most of the pedals dont even have knob names so suggesting what each knob actually does is also encouraged....

    And most important, Be Honest ! - We are after unbiased feedback here and it wont all be positive, and making suggestions for improvement is welcomed ....


    Also keep in mind there are others waiting for the box too, so take a couple days to form a good opinion and then move it to the next reviewer


    and thanks to everyone for participating!

    Original Mystoury Box thread

    Reviews will be consolidated here:

    MysToury Box Central
     
  2. Rollo Timbre

    Rollo Timbre Member

    Messages:
    375
    Joined:
    May 6, 2005
    Location:
    Kirkwood, IL
    Cool. Well I'm the first stop on the mid-west Mystoury box. I was excited to try these three boxes out, especially without the preconceptions that come with brand-names and labels. Also, the boxes are sealed so I couldn't peak to view the circuit. Essentially this is a "cold read."
    I tried all effects using my Suhr Chambered Classic, with 3 v60LP pickups, plugged into a TopHat E-50 (with EL 34's) and a Victoria 35-210 (with 6L6GC's). I really like the clean sound I get with my setup, and, in general, like a pedal which preserves the natural transients I get with my clean sound.

    Pedal #1 This pedal has three knobs and from left to right: Drive, Tone, and Level. This is a great box to add chewy fat overdrive/distortion to a strat. One thing I noticed right off is the way the notes sustain. The sustain reminded me of my old Rat, but the Rat can get more bite to its sound. With the #1, however, I felt the notes were more dimensional than the Rat. But even with the drive control turned down, it still retained some of the fat flavor. And, even though the sound is thick, picking harder rewards you with more dynamics and some great pick harmonics. This would be a great box for sitting around all day playing ZZTop. You lose some of the natural guitar/amp feel, but that's to be expected in this type of box. What you gain are notes that sing with the sweat of a hot Texas blues joint. It was a joy to play through this box. My main concern is that even with the tone control dimed, I still couldn't get much bite out of it. I'm not sure how it would cut through in a band situation. For me, it would be nice to be able to trim the fat a little and add just a touch more mids. Bottom line: Does one sound but does it very good. Even though it would have limited use for my setup, it would still be a fun pedal to have around.

    Pedal #2 This pedal has three knobs and a toggle. From left to right: Volume, Tone, and Drive. This is your basic Tubescreamer pedal. The toggle seems to switch between higher and not-so-high compression. The lower position seems to be about the same as a standard TS pedal. It doesn't do the comp-cut of a FullDrive or Tour Pro Toggle. It also exhibits the traditional mid-hump/bass cut of a classic tubescreamer. The Tone control also has more traditional characteristics and not the full-range control of something like the Tube Zone. This pedal does not retain the naturalness of a Red Snapper or have the smooth singing quality of an Eternity. For more traditional tubescreamer sounds, I preferred my Pedalworx GB-808+. Personally, I felt I was giving up too much of my guitars natural transients--I lost a lot of the little nuances you get between a pick, or finger, and the string. The bottom line, it's a decent tubescreamer clone but wouldn't replace anything on my board.

    Pedal #3 This MXR sized pedal has only two knobs--Volume and Gain. First impression was that this pedal, even without a tone control, is a perfect tone match to a strat, from neck to bridge pickup. Secondly, with regards to pick dynamics and other little nuances, this pedal is very transparent. It felt very natural. Lowering my pick attack, or lowering the guitar's volume, effected natural changes in the pedal's response. This pedal definitely doesn't have a choke hold on the sound. At lower gain settings, the pedal sounds very much like my 6-knob Dirty Blonde. It adds a very natural fatness and tone sweetening. Higher gain settings remain pretty tight and focused. Simply a great natural uncompressed pedal. It stacks well and makes a perfect partner with my Eternity. It doesn't take away but actually seems to add quality to my guitar and amp. Only concern is that it's hard to get unity volume out of this thing--it's a very LOUD pedal. I'd like to have a little more control at the lower end of the volume. Bottom line: I love it--I want one. What the hell is it? I hope I'm suprised when I find out the maker, but as far as I know, there's only a small handful of builders who'd produce something of this quality.

    Well, that's my $.02. As our requirements all differ, it will be fun to read subsequent reviews.
     
  3. malabarmusic

    malabarmusic Member

    Messages:
    1,699
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2003
    Location:
    Chicagoland
    Well, testing three anonymous pedals was more fun than a barrel of monkeys. Apparently someone at USPS thought so too, because they hijacked the box for about a week en route from Rollo to me, but I digress ...

    All testing was done straight into my '72 Hiwatt DR-103 (guitar -> mystoury box -> amp). Guitars included my new '68 LP CA (w/BB 2+3), a stock PRS McSoap Std., and two maple neck Strats -- one with Duncan Alnico IIs and one with S/S/B Lace Sensors.

    Mystoury #1

    This Menatone-sized box sports three traditional knobs -- gain, volume, and tone. My ears tell me this is some sort of MOSFET OD, based on the thick and juicy midrange. The gain has a fairly limited range and not much change is apparent past 11:00. The tone is similar, and basically lets you tweak from warm and dark (at min) to not quite as warm and dark (at max). Huge volume boost is on tap, as unity gain is around 9:00 and it just jumps from there.

    The pedal appears to be true bypass, and sounded identical whether powered off the internal battery or a PP2. My ears tell me the battery is probably a 14-hour-old Ray-O-Vac from the batch that expires in Nov. 2009. I also detected an overtone of cedar in the bouquet and Madagascar vanilla on the finish. :D

    OK, how does it sound? Pretty darn good. This pedal has some of the nicest harmonics I've heard from a dirtbox in a while. I easily got notes all over the fretboard to feedback with very little effort and at quite modest volume. The overall tonality is a bit "barky." It's a very thick midrange, not to be confused with a TS-style "mid hump" -- just gobs of low order harmonics and not a lot of high order harmonics. Almost reminiscient of a cocked wah with a broad Q. The pedal's sound is also very compressed, which must contribute somehow to the impressive sustain and feedback.

    Like most high gain compressed pedals, there's a fair amount of hiss. This is most noticeable when rolling back the guitar volume. The cleanup factor isn't all that great, and picking dynamics are so-so at best. Kind of a one-trick pony, but I happen to dig the trick.

    I think this pedal has a bit *too* much gain on tap, as I get the best tones with the gain pot around 10:00 (and volume on 2:00). The Les Paul seemed to hit the front end too hard, and I got much better results with the PRS and both Strats.

    The pedal in my kit that sounded closest to #1 was the Catalinbread SCOD. #1 was nowhere near as amp-like or dynamic as the SCOD, and it also has way more gain and output. Still, I could dial them in to sound reasonably close, though #1 was always more compressed and darker.

    Is it a keeper? Probably not for me. If I used mainly low output pickups, favored a compressed lead tone, and made frequent use of sustained notes fading into harmonics, I might be all over it. A nice piece of work that definitely has its own thing going on.

    Mystoury #2

    All together now ...

    What the world
    Needs now
    Is another
    Tube Screamer
    So I can rock your @#$%! world


    TS-style pedals are fun to bash, but why do I like playing them so much? I guess it's the instant gratification factor. Whoever designed this circuit should be getting rich off royalties. Anyway ...

    What we have is a familiar small box with the usual lineup of volume/gain/tone knobs and a bonus microswitch. My guess is that the switch changes the diode arrangement, as it has zero effect when the gain is off, and dramatically changes the distortion and compression characteristics at higher settings of the gain knob.

    Tone: Were you reading when I said this is a TS variation? :) Well, to my ears it's a very good one. A little hissy perhaps, and very modest in terms of boost capabilities. It does more than unity gain, but not a lot more. I didn't have a pure TS circuit for comparison, but the closest on hand was a Menatone Blue Collar. This pedal has more bottom end than the BC, which isn't saying much, but the fuller bass and low mids comes at the expense of some "transparency." The BC really lets single coil (Strat and P90) tones come through, whereas this box homogenized things a bit.

    I really preferred the tone with the switch in the "down" position. This gave a lot more volume, less compression, and a richer, fuller, more natural midrange. With the PRS and its P90s, this setting gave "Green Day" tone for days. Fun stuff! The TS sound isn't a key part of my sonic arsenal, so I don't know that I'd be a buyer for this one. My BC isn't part of my regular board, but I like to pull it out once in a while for kicks. In that regard, I'd be tempted to swap the BC straight up for this guy.

    The pedal I've played that reminded me most of this bad boy was BJ's LGW. Could this be a new and improved LGW with a diode switch? If so, I'd call it a winner. If not, it's still a winner -- and probably a more affordable one as Bjorn's pedals cost a heckuva lot for those of us on this side of the pond.

    Mystoury #3

    I played this pedal for about an hour last night, and as soon as I powered down I e-mailed Donner and informed him I was holding the box hostage until he told me what it was and where I could buy one. Seriously. I MUST have one!

    It's a dirt simple dirt box, with just two knobs for gain (backwards! CCW is more, CW is less) and volume and not even a 9V adapter. At high gain (especially with the LP), I found it way too "spitty" for my tastes. Kind of like an overloaded tranny fuzz. At lower gain the sound isn't all that impressive unless the volume is turned up to push the amp's front end. Keeping the gain at 12:00 or higher (which is the lower half of the gain range) and the volume above noon, though ... all I can say is WOW! It is absolutely everything people say about the COT50 or Dual Drive (two pedals I've owned and sold) and then some. It just melds with the amp and becomes an indispensible part of the tonal equation. The gain is extremely dynamic and transparent -- so much so that you can hear the string windings come through loud and clear. It gives great "woman tone" if you have the amp cranked up enough, and the lack of compression is a beautiful thing. For reference, I A/Bd it with box #2 in the uncompressed setting, and the latter pedal's comp was dramatically greater by comparison.

    My only niggle is that I would have liked a little more gain without the spittiness that comes from dialing up the pedal. Still, going into the jumpered Hiwatt with master and both channel volumes at 2/3 it was glorious British-flavored old school crunch (think AC/DC for reference). I would have killed to hear it through a Plexi-style amp, as I imagine that's a match made in tonal heaven.

    The cleanup factor (using the guitar volume) rates an A+, again miles ahead of the COT50 -- IMHO. This is definitely a "leave it on" type pedal that should go first in the chain, or just after a wah. If I had more time, I would have liked to have experimented with stacking in order to get a little more drive going into the amp, but the noise level was modest enough that I'm optimistic on this front.

    The box is on its way to JofZ, so I'm sure we'll hear his $0.02 before long. Thanks so much to Donner and the builders, as I think the Mystoury tour box is a great concept that we should make a regular part of our gear-oriented obsessions.

    - DB
     
  4. VanStone

    VanStone Member

    Messages:
    347
    Joined:
    May 19, 2005
    I decided to review each of these pedals twice: once through a Fendery rig, and once through a Marshally rig.

    The Fendery rig is a Strat copy -> Pedal -> Allen Accomplice Jr. The Marshally rig is a Gibson style guitar -> Pedal -> Groove Tubes Soul-O 50. The Fendery rig was run clean. The Marshally rig was run just starting to break up.

    Pedal # 7: This is a 3-knob low gain OD. Typical volume, tone, and gain knobs. I would guess that it is not based on a TS circuit: it had good bass response and the equalization was quite flat. Although I haven’t played one, I would guess this is similar to a Barber LTD. I found the volume and gain knobs to be more interactive than average.

    Fendery Rig - It was quite muffy with this rig. I ended up turning the tone knob to the treble side, and eventually switched to, and settled on, the bridge pup on the Strat. Which is definitely not the norm for me - the bridge pup is overly bright on my strat and I never use it on its own. As I said the pedal is a low gainer, and I found myself opening the gain up all the way to get any useable breakup with the clean amp. Note separation and clarity was good, its dynamics were average, and it responded very well to changes in the volume knob. All in all, it was too muffy with this rig, though.

    Marshally Rig - Ahhh, the pedal shines with this rig! With the mid-push from the Marshally tone stack the muffiness is gone; quite transparent sounding. With higher gain settings clarity was good through about 4-note chords, more notes than that and it choked up a bit (it’s better than most ODs in this regard – pretty good separation). Dynamics were slightly better with this rig - I would still characterize the dynamics as fairly average or slightly above, and response to the guitar volume knob changes was still excellent. The pedal was capable of pushing the amp from the slight breakup I started with, to a nice EVH sort of crunch (not too hard to do with this amp), and everything in-between sounded great. Not too compressed either - it had a good open sound to it. Excellent pedal with this rig.

    Pedal #8: Well, there’s no need to run this through both rigs. What we have here is a Chorus/Vibrato pedal. It has 3 knobs and two switches. The first knob is depth, second is rate, and the 3rd knob is a 4-position rotary switch that selects the pitch. The left switch selects chorus or vibrato. The right switch is another rate adjustment for normal or fast. I’m not a modulation fan, with the exception of roto-vibe; so, I’m afraid I can’t offer much here. All I can say is it does what it’s supposed to do <shrug>. I didn’t spend too much time with this one, as I really can’t offer an informed opinion here.

    Pedal # 9: Well, it looks like we got a nice variety of pedals here on the Wild Wild West tour. This one is a volume boost. One knob and a switch. I’m having difficulty zeroing in on what the switch does. I’m not sure if it adds a full range boost or if it’s a mild bass boost. Whatever it is, it’s quite subtle.

    Fendery rig - Nice clean boost. Excellent clarity and transparency. There’s enough boost to make the amp just start to break up a little if you open the pedal all the way up.

    Marshally rig - Again, nice clean boost. Still excellent clarity and transparency. After playing it through this rig, I’m going to guess that the switch is a mild bass boost. It seems to affect mainly the low end. The down position is boosted. Great idea really - switch the bass boost off with a Fendery amp that has enough bass, switch the boost on with a Marshally rig to bring out a little more low end. This is the second boost pedal I’ve had the pleasure to play, and I really like what they will do for a Marshally rig. I put the boost switch down, cranked the knob to about 3 o’clock, and I could go with the guitar volume knob from there. Put the guitar volume knob at about 7 and I had the nice little breakup I started with, only louder, dime it and the amp snarls menacingly. Great stuff! Excellent clean boost pedal.

    Best,
    V
     
  5. muddy

    muddy Member

    Messages:
    5,719
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2003
    Location:
    nyc
    all right, i evidently have box b, with #'s 4, 5a, 5b and 6. i ran through each quickly, but i'll give you an immediate impression, as i really enjoyed some of these!

    #4 i wasn't to impressed by. seems to be a fuzz of some sort, and as such, it is probably gonna be picky as to where it gets placed. the spot i stuck it in wasn't too happenin'; it sounded very thin. but i'll fix that up tomorrow by sticking it at the front of my chain.

    5a & 5b were a delight!!! they are obviously both minivibes. i gotta tellyou, i an WAY impressed by both! well, by the concept, of which both do an admirable job. i just didn't think they get it THAT closely to a real univibe! 5a is the clearer of the 2, sounds better clean than 5b, but running it into a fuzz is what you'll want to be doin' with it! like i said, a bit better articulation, a SLIGHT volume drop.
    5b is headier, and a bit overdriven (which doesn't work for clean as well as 5a). but add a fuzz and WHOA!!!! it's got a deeper swirl, and grabs single notes almost like the ah in a wah!!! there was a volume bump (up) with this vibe. 5b did a better star spangled banner because of the deeper throb, but if i HAD to pick one, i'd have to choose 5a because of it's clarity. i'd really like both :D , but either way, they are both a joy to play!!

    #6 was a gas!!! it's obviously a trem with a 2nd footswitch that acts like a mixed up tap tempo. the 1st knob i still need to get a handle on. it affects the speed, but it's doing something else, to. it's almost like it's for different behaviours for the trem. the middle knob is a volume, and the last a trem to dry blend/mix pot. if i'm remembering correctly. like i said, it was a very quick demo. it was a very warm effect that really came to life with an overdrive before it. i REALLY enjoyed this pedal a lot, and i am NOT a real trem kinda guy. i would definitely use this pedal!

    anyway, i'll get stuck into 'em in the next in the next coupla days & report back. and thanx for including me in this thing, donner :cool:


    ml
     
  6. Don Rusk

    Don Rusk Biggus Bearfootus Vendor

    Messages:
    6,979
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Location:
    St. Louis
    sure thing muddy --- was there a little cheat on the Trem still ???
     
  7. muddy

    muddy Member

    Messages:
    5,719
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2003
    Location:
    nyc
    actually, for #6, i got the two knobs to the right wrong. the middle is the fx/dry blend, and the last to the right sets the time it takes for the onset of the effect (kind of a ramp up). and that's where the fun begins!!


    ml
     
  8. Don Rusk

    Don Rusk Biggus Bearfootus Vendor

    Messages:
    6,979
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Location:
    St. Louis
    oh muddy also, could you include a rig report too for context (strat/sg/smf still ??)
     
  9. muddy

    muddy Member

    Messages:
    5,719
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2003
    Location:
    nyc
    g&L legacy/u.s. strat plus/sg-smf 15watter :cool:


    ml

     
  10. muddy

    muddy Member

    Messages:
    5,719
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2003
    Location:
    nyc
    ah, the position change for #4 worked, btw. it's definitely a fuzz of some sort with tubescreamer characteristics, mid-gained. use it for a neck single coil and you're in jimi-rhythmland. really nice tone on this one.


    ml
     
  11. JimiB

    JimiB Member

    Messages:
    399
    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2003
    Location:
    Overland Park, KS
    Sorry for the delay in posting this!
    We are getting ready for baby #1 and things are crazy!

    I tried these pedals out with my strat (USACG wood and Callaham hardware- Suhr VP-60LP pickups) and with my Gibson 335 w 57 classic pickups. These were plugged into a blackfaced Pro Reverb with a Bassman OT and an EV-15L speaker.
    The pedals were plugged into a true bypass loop and none of them had "tone suckage"- the tone was the same (with the pedal off) whether it was in the loop or out.

    #7 This pedal suggested tube screamer when I first saw it and plugged into it, but surprised me when I turned it on-
    Nice low gain OD, fairly compressed in a nice way. Much more compressed than say a TIM. Hence it dosent have a lot of clarity when being driven by another pedal. Dosent seem to have any EQ humps. Capable of a clean boost as well as nice OD. The Vol. and Gain controls (i am assuming vol-tone-gain as the pedal is unmarked) are very interactive. Nice pedal.

    #8 Holy Cow this pedal blew me away! I will buy this pedal when I find out what it is if I can afford it. Many chorus pedals sound somewhat cold and sterile to me (yes ive had a clone chorus- both an original and the AM version)
    I would call this the ultimate chorus pedal. So tweakable.
    Thick, Rich, and Lush. The pitch control- A 4 pos rotary switch yielded many options in conjunction with the other controls. With the switch in pos 1, I did get some ugly distortion in some settings but with the range of these controls I am forgiving. The vibrato setting also sounded fantastic- I would end up using this pedal many different ways. The speed switch (fast/slow) combined with the speed knob gave me everything from ultra slow chorusing to crazy filter type sounds- THE LED BLINKS WITH THE SPEED! Awesome. Definitely analog. Beautifull!:dude

    #9 Treble booster? Full range booster?
    O.K. one knob, one switch- not much drive, lots of boost.
    With the switch in the up pos it sounded like a treble booster. Not harsh or shrill. With the switch in the down pos it is a full range booster. (the treble boost is still there btw) and adds lots of fat yet tight low end. With the pedal set like this into a clean amp you really miss it when you turn it off. Nice pedal.
    Desent sound like my germanium treble booster.
    Nice fat booster, or treble booster if you dont want lots of drive with it.
     
  12. muddy

    muddy Member

    Messages:
    5,719
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2003
    Location:
    nyc
    had a play with #4 again today, and i REALLY like this pedal! it does not have over the top gain, but it does have very prominent tube (ecc83) character! it's awesome for tom petty-style arpeggiated rock chords and the like. i'm dying to know what it is now!


    ml
     
  13. leofenderbender

    leofenderbender Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,420
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Location:
    Oregon
    For all three reviews I played a Warmoth hollow ash strat with Suhr V60LPs AND a very light weight solid ash Warmoth strat with DeTemple pickups (both with Callaham hardware) through a Tone King Comet 40B and the blackface channel:

    PEDAL NUMBER SEVEN

    EQ is relatively flat, not like a tubescreamer in that the mids aren’t pushed out much. Not a distortion pedal either – it is a low to medium overdrive.

    The tone is similar to what a tube amp sounds like just before it is time to retube – the distortion you get when the tubes nearly reach saturation without having to be pushed much, at low volume. It does a great job of mimicking a tube amp – smooth compression.

    Overall, the pedal is somewhat dark for my taste. If you play (relatively) clean or without much overdrive this pedal probably wouldn’t be on much. If you like light to medium distortion, the tone is clearer in the bridge and the neck pickup. Chords are distorted but break with just a little bleedover – single note runs are fat - the bridge sounds great for lead work. In the 2 & 4 positions, the pedal is less distinct– I don’t know about the mid pickup since I never play it by itself anyway. The sounds I get with the 2 & 4 are similar to the tone you get when playing through an ALNICO speaker – soft peaks, some compression, a touch of sweetness – an interesting effect.

    The pedal distorts without adding fizz – no fuzz either - the distortion is richer than that, similar to that of a MOS transistor.

    I like what this pedal does. It has appeal for those wanting to add tube-like sweetness and compression. I’d buy this pedal if it wasn’t so dark.

    PEDAL NUMBER EIGHT

    A nice analog chorus/vibrato pedal. This pedal has plenty of usable sounds in it – maybe too many features to explore in the short time I have in this venue. I have determined that there are three varieties of chorus pedals: the flange-type (like Fulltone), the super clear type (like TC Electronics), and the watery type (like a Boss CE-1). This pedal is a watery type. The chorus isn’t as watery or rich as my Retro Sonic but it has a lot of similarities and more usable tones than you would ever need.

    The toggle for low & high speed is a nice feature – it can be used to add ambiance and sweetness to a clean strat. It adds much to a clean strat going through a blackface. As for the vibrato, I never really used it much – this one is quite clear and not unlike the RS chorus – I could find uses for it if I was motivated enough to tweak it.

    I don’t use chorus much but it is an effect that adds a lot to certain songs (or passages in songs) so much that I couldn’t live without one. If I didn’t have my RS chorus already, I’d buy one of these. I like the high speed switch and not having to use a wall wart. Although I give the nod to the RS Chorus, this is a very impressive pedal!

    PEDAL NUMBER NINE

    This pedal should be called a telecaster simulator pedal. It is a clean boost, or more accurately a “clear” boost. It adds lots of volume.

    The upper position of the toggle pushes out more treble than bass (it might be too thin) – the lower position adds volume and fat and thickens everything up (treble/mids/bass) while still retaining clarity. The upper position didn’t get as much use unless I was chording – the down position is good for lead work – or for chording too for that matter. Both positions add volume and clarity without adding noise or dirt.

    On the low toggle with the bridge pickup, I get the pop I recall of a tele bridge pickup when picking close to the saddles. The same effect occurs when switching to the neck pickup though with the added bass of the neck.

    The pedal is very nice but I would want to suggest a change in its design – the toggle should be replaced with a footswitch so I can switch to the upper toggle for chording and the lower toggle for single notes without having to bend over or (clumsily) use my foot. The lower position is superior to the upper – I would never use the upper unless I had a footswitch. The lower would always be on.

    I like what the lower toggle of this pedal does, especially how it simulates the bridge pickup on a tele for a strat user – I miss that tone! If I missed it enough, I’d buy this pedal.
     
  14. leofenderbender

    leofenderbender Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,420
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Location:
    Oregon
    Thanks DonneR for hosting this project! What an honor to test & review pedals without knowing the pedigree.

    Blind tastings are best for wine too. If the label isn't hidden, everybody would pick the Mouton Rothschild.
     
  15. Don Rusk

    Don Rusk Biggus Bearfootus Vendor

    Messages:
    6,979
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Location:
    St. Louis
    thanks LFB and everyone - your doin great, keep it up ! :cool:
     
  16. leofenderbender

    leofenderbender Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,420
    Joined:
    Nov 8, 2004
    Location:
    Oregon
    Don:

    It looks like you put my review for pedal number 8 on your web page for pedal number 9... OOPS!
     
  17. muddy

    muddy Member

    Messages:
    5,719
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2003
    Location:
    nyc
    hey don, don't forget this update to #6. :)


    ml

     
  18. Don Rusk

    Don Rusk Biggus Bearfootus Vendor

    Messages:
    6,979
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Location:
    St. Louis
    File that under DOOOOH!!

    :D

    thanks again - spread a little thin these days.....:cool:
     
  19. Don Rusk

    Don Rusk Biggus Bearfootus Vendor

    Messages:
    6,979
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Location:
    St. Louis
    Thanks and I got your rig report on the other two, and I took out the name since everyone else is just post handles.......

    thanks again muddy !!
     
  20. Don Rusk

    Don Rusk Biggus Bearfootus Vendor

    Messages:
    6,979
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Location:
    St. Louis
    Yeah seems 3 is a favorite already and likely got left plugged in a bit more :D I send you some directions ~~~~thanks
     

Share This Page