Name a recent "young" major/successful touring band

monwobobbo

Member
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6,202
I'm just drawing a comparison that bands that I mentioned and of that era. i.e., have a couple albums, and suddenly selling out sports arenas. That was very common in the 80s. But all but died, it seems, in the early 2000s.

Now the rocket ship a band needs to be on to achieve that seems bigger. Coldplay became enormous is just 3 years. Oasis exploded pretty big...late 90s. But I struggle to think of a non-pop-machine artist that did this recently.
The age of arena rock has past. Get with the program the festival is where most up and coming bands play.
 

CBHTele

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857
I got into them past their peak, but Muse was HUGE in the 2000s, and still headline festivals around the world when they are out. Even as recently as 2019, they were close to selling out arenas in the US, even though their last album was a bit too much concept and not enough substance. Still one of the last few great live ROCK bands that can bring it in any setting, and with one of the last of the great frontmen left.
 

MikeMcK

Gold Supporting Member
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5,267
The age of arena rock has past. Get with the program the festival is where most up and coming bands play.
That's a fact. A few years ago the top 3 grossing arena acts for the year globally featured 3 guys who lived within a mile of each other:
1. Bruce Springsteen
2. Bon Jovi
3 Cirque de Soleil's international tour of a Michael Jackson-based tribute (opened with and featured my buddy Michael Ghegan from Red Bank, NJ)

Michael was in his 40's, the other two a bit past that. There's now a generation of people brought up to believe music is free, and for a lot of them a pair of tickets to an arena show can be half a weekly paycheck. It's not happening.
 

sws1

Member
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11,197
The age of arena rock has past. Get with the program the festival is where most up and coming bands play.
You could survive by touring arenas, and have a good life. Those people were not up-and-coming. They had arrived. Playing a festival once very 3 weeks, when you are not one of the top named bands, is no way to become rich and famous.

Point being...you can't arrive in your 20s anymore.
 

monwobobbo

Member
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6,202
You could survive by touring arenas, and have a good life. Those people were not up-and-coming. They had arrived. Playing a festival once very 3 weeks, when you are not one of the top named bands, is no way to become rich and famous.

Point being...you can't arrive in your 20s anymore.
Back in the day touring wasnt a money making deal for many bands. The shows were to help promote the new album. Record sales made the band money.

The day of the "rock star" is also gone. You can "arrive" in your 20s still but what that means may have changed a bit. Also keep in mind that many of the bands of the past didnt see a ton of cash until later in their careers. An album could sell a million copies but the record label had to recoupe all its expenses first ( including that big arena tour).
 

kcprogguitar

Member
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2,729
This is the very question I ask when making the point that rock isn't dead but is a dead man walking. Sure you have established acts playing arenas and stadiums but there's no new blood doing it, and there hasn't been any in a long time. I suppose you can say that this applies mostly in the US, as newer/younger rock acts play large venues in other parts of the world.
So you're saying that rock is playing smaller venues to smaller audiences. I'd say the scene is stronger for having a dedicated following than a few big bands and then a wasteland. I see plenty of young artists putting out LPs and touring (not that I go to them, I don't), or they were before COVID.

I see the videos of the concerts of Earthless and Plini etc...they seem to have a pretty dedicated following. Its not huge, but it's not dead.
 




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