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Nash/K-line/etc.

Teleplayer

Moder8er
Staff member
Messages
19,775
Man it’s 2020 now, and I’m a little amazed at how things change. When I first heard of Nash, they were the elite alternate Fender brand to buy. This was back in 2010ish. I believe that a lot of the hate on Nash has to do with Bill Nash actually being able to scale his business to demand, something that guys like Danocaster either refused to do or were unable to do. So now the former underdog Nash has a ton of guitars out there, and they are great, but everyone has heard of them and seem to be getting tired of them. Probably started when we started to see guys like John Mayer play one. Now K-line is becoming the new hotness because Danocaster keeps messing with all of us with his limited Instagram lottery race method of selling. Until I can be sure K-line will reasonably be able to hold value and be able to move hands quickly when posted for sale I’ll be looking on eagerly from the sidelines, as I tend to move through gear quickly. And that’s a plus for Nash, people are more familiar with them and thus easier to sell. There is also a wide selection of used ones that can be found for sale at any given time. I would never buy new. Like a car, the instant you drive a new one off the lot they lose quite a bit in value (depending on model and extras) but they tend to hold a steady used value from $1400-$1700.

That all being said, some might argue that as Bill scaled up to meet demand, quality went down. I have absolutely no idea if that is true though, my one constant asset is a T-57 is from 2012 and I can’t put it down. I will say I would not buy a second one with all these great builders out there to try from (looking at you hard K-Line!).
Some interesting assumptions in your post. I buy my guitars to play and keep - and really could not care less about value in the used market. I go to folks like McInturff, Kauer and Lentz because of their mad skills - not because of "what would happen if I decide some day in the future to sell." I also have an utter one-off Danocaster I will never sell.

Next, I don't think Dan Strain is "messing" with anybody. As far back as 2011/2012, when I spoke with Dan and purchased my Danocasters, he was wrestling with how/if he wanted to ramp up his business. Dan's a very solid and nice cat and very smart person. I think he simply became tired and bit disenchanted with the growth his business went through and wanted to "take a breather" and get back to his roots - which was building cool guitars that he wanted to build, and then selling them when they are/were completed. I don't believe Dan has/had any ill intent or intent to mess with anybody - rather, he is in the enviable position to build what interests him, and he has a demand that outstrips the supply.

And, to get back to the topic, Chris K is a solid cat, and builds a great product. In house. Under his own control. At very fair prices. I do not own one of Chris's guitars - but have played a few - and one in particular that still stays firmly implanted in my mind even though I played it 14 years ago.
 

Ferg Deluxe

Double Platinum Member
Messages
2,086
One thing Chris at K-Line does that goes under-mentioned is that he uses bridges that have a slightly more narrow string spacing than Fender and many Strat clones. Never a problem with E string "falling off the board" hassles that put me off many otherwise fine Strat specimens.
Yes -- another check box in K-line's favor, at least *to me*. I prefer the more Gibson-leaning string spacing, and the benefit of more room on either side of the E strings is a nice bonus.
 
Messages
7
Some interesting assumptions in your post. I buy my guitars to play and keep - and really could not care less about value in the used market. I go to folks like McInturff, Kauer and Lentz because of their mad skills - not because of "what would happen if I decide some day in the future to sell." I also have an utter one-off Danocaster I will never sell.

Next, I don't think Dan Strain is "messing" with anybody. As far back as 2011/2012, when I spoke with Dan and purchased my Danocasters, he was wrestling with how/if he wanted to ramp up his business. Dan's a very solid and nice cat and very smart person. I think he simply became tired and bit disenchanted with the growth his business went through and wanted to "take a breather" and get back to his roots - which was building cool guitars that he wanted to build, and then selling them when they are/were completed. I don't believe Dan has/had any ill intent or intent to mess with anybody - rather, he is in the enviable position to build what interests him, and he has a demand that outstrips the supply.

And, to get back to the topic, Chris K is a solid cat, and builds a great product. In house. Under his own control. At very fair prices. I do not own one of Chris's guitars - but have played a few - and one in particular that still stays firmly implanted in my mind even though I played it 14 years ago.
Yeah I agree, don’t take me too literally, it’s not Dan’s fault that his guitars are on fire. And again I’m looking hard at K-line, definitely like what I’m seeing!
 

Slevin

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,725
It's not the same, and I think you know that. Trusting your supplier to give you what you ask (assuming you know what to require) is far different than having everything onsite that you can control yourself.

Let's say that you are outsourcing necks. You are going to ask for a neck basically the same way a guy orders one from say, Warmoth. First, unless you order large quantities you are tied into your suppliers options and ability to build something. Where was the wood sourced? Can the supplier buy larger quantities to drive down cost? Was the wood sorted for figuring? Can I choose how I want the wood cut? How did the guy dry the wood? How long was the process...what was the wood moisture content when it was used? How was it stored before/during the manufacturing process? Where did the guy get his truss rods from? When was the last time the CNC has been calibrated? How often does the tooling get changed? How is the machine programmed to sequence the cuts? How often does the equipment get serviced? How was the guy running the machine trained? Was the person training him competent to do so? What types of quality problems have occurred during the time this supplier is making you necks? What was done to correct these? Who does the quality checks? Is it someone trained to do this? How were they trained? What types of inspection are done on the build while it is in process? Is this documented, and can the supplier show the buyer this information? What if changes to the process happen...how quickly can the buyer get something changed, a spec modified?

These things can all impact the quality of the product. How the supplier does these things...if he does...and how well determines how long that "trusted partner/supplier" can last.

I could go on and on...
Are you under the assumption Nash uses every piece they purchase?
 

John Hurtt

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
18,801
Are you under the assumption Nash uses every piece they purchase?
Are you under the assumption that they are shipped dozens of parts...they sort through them and ship back the balance on the suppliers dime? Or, do they eat the cost and toss them? Or, just send the occasional one back they don't like even though the supplier met specs? Regardless....doesn't change what I posted. I'm not sure what is so difficult to understand here...the more you control of your process the better the opportunity to create the product you want.
 

Slevin

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,725
Are you under the assumption that they are shipped dozens of parts...they sort through them and ship back the balance on the suppliers dime? Or, do they eat the cost and toss them? Or, just send the occasional one back they don't like even though the supplier met specs? Regardless....doesn't change what I posted. I'm not sure what is so difficult to understand here...the more you control of your process the better the opportunity to create the product you want.
I’m not assuming anything, that’s my point. Unless you have knowledge that Nash guitars are lying themselves, they’ve openly stated they do not use everything they buy. They do a pre build inspection on everything the way anyone would do POST cutting the bodies and finishing necks etc, (resonance, weight, etc) and build from there and burn the rest. So, unless you are specifically saying bill Nash is lying, then that’s what they do. Where they cut the bodies is irrelevant if you still have a quality inspection before build, which they state they do. That’s all I’m trying to say. I’ll gladly apologize if I’m wrong here.
 

Ferg Deluxe

Double Platinum Member
Messages
2,086
Both ways of production are valid, and both can yield excellent results.

Having worked for many different manufacturers (not guitars) I can say it’s a truly rare occasion when a product with any kind of complexity does *not* use some number of components from a supplier. And I can tell you that on several of those occasions we worked extraordinarily close with certain suppliers who made specific parts to our exacting specs. It was a close relationship and had to be.

Lots of things that came from suppliers were rejected — we didn’t just blindly use parts without consideration — and also a lot of those things we manufactured in-house also failed our QA/QC.
 

John Hurtt

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
18,801
I’m not assuming anything, that’s my point. Unless you have knowledge that Nash guitars are lying themselves, they’ve openly stated they do not use everything they buy. They do a pre build inspection on everything the way anyone would do POST cutting the bodies and finishing necks etc, (resonance, weight, etc) and build from there and burn the rest. So, unless you are specifically saying bill Nash is lying, then that’s what they do. Where they cut the bodies is irrelevant if you still have a quality inspection before build, which they state they do. That’s all I’m trying to say. I’ll gladly apologize if I’m wrong here.
Your point is that you aren't assuming anything....ok. I'm not as well, as I clearly stated. I also listed numerous ways that in house builds can yield more consistent and higher quality parts. I'm still not sure what the issue is, frankly. It does appear that you are a Nash fanboy, which is cool.
 
Last edited:

Presc

Member
Messages
1,282
Both ways of production are valid, and both can yield excellent results.

Having worked for many different manufacturers (not guitars) I can say it’s a truly rare occasion when a product with any kind of complexity does *not* use some number of components from a supplier. And I can tell you that on several of those occasions we worked extraordinarily close with certain suppliers who made specific parts to our exacting specs. It was a close relationship and had to be.

Lots of things that came from suppliers were rejected — we didn’t just blindly use parts without consideration — and also a lot of those things we manufactured in-house also failed our QA/QC.
Completely agree. A lot of products that are far more complicated than guitars are built with components with external suppliers. I did setups on both my K-Line and Danocaster tonight, which give me an opportunity to observe the neck pocket fit. The K-Line is an in-house guitar, the Danocaster is "parts guitar" albeit from parts made to a specific spec by a very well respected builder in Mario Martin. Both had super tight pockets that fit like a glove, lightweight bodies, and are brilliant guitars.

If your outsourced parts are made to great spec, you'll have a great product. That said, having played both, I'm taking K-Line over Nash all day :phones
 

Gasp100

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
21,321
I can’t put my k-line truxton special down.

Beautiful. Great combo of gear, I really want to try a Lightspeed soon into clean/cleanish amp.
I've owned K-Line and Nash.
I sold a K-Line that I should have kept and a Nash T that I should have kept, but amazing guitars. I was very surprised at how great the Nash sounded and played. Cleary the builder was good at picking resonant parts and piecing together a great instrument (better then my assemblies) and a great setup.
K-Line was really special. The French polishing on the neck is awesome, super deep colors/tint, incredibly smooth feel, literally "like butter" LOL.
I would probably go for a new(er) K-Line at this point if I wanted to upgrade my MJT personal builds (probably have to sell 2 to get 1).
If I wanted to stretch I could probable get into a Nash by selling one of my builds and coming up with another ~$500 or so on the used market.
The only thing with Nash is I kept wondering did I just "get lucky"? But that is probably because of comments read here on TGP which in hindsight is kind of silly.
 

trojanhov

Member
Messages
585
Beautiful. Great combo of gear, I really want to try a Lightspeed soon into clean/cleanish amp.
I've owned K-Line and Nash.
I sold a K-Line that I should have kept and a Nash T that I should have kept, but amazing guitars. I was very surprised at how great the Nash sounded and played. Cleary the builder was good at picking resonant parts and piecing together a great instrument (better then my assemblies) and a great setup.
K-Line was really special. The French polishing on the neck is awesome, super deep colors/tint, incredibly smooth feel, literally "like butter" LOL.
I would probably go for a new(er) K-Line at this point if I wanted to upgrade my MJT personal builds (probably have to sell 2 to get 1).
If I wanted to stretch I could probable get into a Nash by selling one of my builds and coming up with another ~$500 or so on the used market.
The only thing with Nash is I kept wondering did I just "get lucky"? But that is probably because of comments read here on TGP which in hindsight is kind of silly.
thanks man! The z lux is clean. Lightspeed is special
 




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