Need a budget condenser that adds mid range to vocal track

FuzzOff

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My vocal tracks seem to be lacking mids and low-mids. Are there any mics that will accentuate mids, low-mids to compliment my voice?
 

Ulysses

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I find this is the big problem with any low priced condenser. I would MUCh rather have a high quality dynamic than budget condenser. A mic like an MD441 has an extended top end that sounds much like a condenser but very smooth, fat mids. It has been a pro studio staple for several decades and still used in the biggest studios in the world. Many will disagree but I can get much better tracks from a great dynamic than a cheap condenser.
 
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'Cheap' and 'condenser' generally are words, that belong in separate contexts.What are you currently using for mic, DAW, and audio interface? There are several potential spots where you can get hung up. Is there a mic pre involved?
 

Ulysses

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'Cheap' and 'condenser' generally are words, that belong in separate contexts.
Yes, "cheap" would certainly be relative if speaking about LDC's which I assumed he was referring to since it was for vocal application. The majority of LDC's typically found in a pro environment would probably fall within the $3000-$8000 price range. Relatively speaking, a mic under $1500 or so would be a much "cheaper" or a "cheap" condenser. In this context I find a high quality dynamic to be a better choice in most situations than a "cheap" condenser. I don't know of any LDC in the "cheaper" price range that will deliver the type of firm midrange presence and muscle that a high quality dynamic like a 441 can and still maintain condenser-like highs.
 

FuzzOff

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I should have added some additional info. I have an AT4040 as my main vocal mic. It's very flat.

I realize there are better mics, I just can't shell out that kinda dough. I was hoping to find something in the same price range with a more colored tone. I'm open to dynamics, but want to stay in the same range. I run through a Soundracft EPM mixer, which has decent (but clean) pres.
 

meterman

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SM7B? Very full and fat sounding dynamic mic, great for male vocals, I love mine and can find them used for $300 or less...
 

rob2001

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Just bumping as i'm curious on suggestions as well. I will try an SM7b when funds permit. For the meantime, I found that I like a good old SM 57 with a big foam ball and a windscreen on my vocals over budget ($100.00 to $500.00) mics. It helps to use a preamp and a bit of EQ'ing is needed, but it works for me until I can try somthing like an SM7b.
 

shawntp

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Consider looking at or searching up a Shure SM7b - its a great male rock vocal mic - will take lots of SPL and has a good low and midrange. I had it and need to bump the EQ in the high end. If I did more rock vocals or wasn't so quiet I would still own mine.

Cheap condensers have come a long way but always have shortcomings, people tend to skip over affordable tried & true classics for the latest chinese budget gear.
 

Jack Daniels

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The AT4040 is not as flat as you think....

To me IMO, its got a bright top end...not all that harsh, but bright. That causes the mids to get swallowed up in the mix. You can only bring the vocal up so much before it sticks out because of the top end. (6-9khz?). You might try just pulling down the 7.5Khz range on an eq and see if you can bring the vocals up more. Also, don't be afraid to push the 2-3.5Khz range forward.

And finally, all tracks need some eq'n. Don't be afraid to pull out some 3khz from guitars and drum tracks. This will free up space for the vocals.

I think the single most common problem begining engineers do is not "carve" away a spot for the vocals to sit. Often the get the mix sounding great..and THEN add vocals on top of that. You need to be consious of what place the vocals need to sit. By removing some EQ around 3-5khz you make room for your vocal to be heard. You don't need much. Maybe 1db per instrument may cause enough room for the vocals. Try it, you might find the 4040 will work ok.
 

rob2001

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16,937
And finally, all tracks need some eq'n. Don't be afraid to pull out some 3khz from guitars and drum tracks. This will free up space for the vocals.

I think the single most common problem begining engineers do is not "carve" away a spot for the vocals to sit. Often the get the mix sounding great..and THEN add vocals on top of that. You need to be consious of what place the vocals need to sit. By removing some EQ around 3-5khz you make room for your vocal to be heard. You don't need much. Maybe 1db per instrument may cause enough room for the vocals. Try it, you might find the 4040 will work ok.

I'm not quite a beginner, yet certainly not a pro....but subtracting aspects of a mix is something i've come to find as extremely useful. Instead of turning one thing up in the mix, it can work better to turn other things down. I've done this with EQ'ing and compression.
 




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