Need amp advice for recording.

Discussion in 'Bass Area; The Bottom Line' started by brewbaker, Mar 17, 2015.

  1. brewbaker

    brewbaker Supporting Member

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    I'm a guitar player so I'm hoping my bass player brothers can steer me in the right direction in choosing an amp to be resident in my studio. It would be for visiting bass players to use during a session if they don't want to go direct or would like to do both. I don't want to invest a lot and I don't think I need something larger than say, an Ampeg B15 but that's just me. What do you guys think?
     
  2. Dubious

    Dubious Member

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    b15!

    only problem withj the b15 - at least in my experience - is runnin the line out makes the tone change a bit - ymmv
     
  3. lowyaw

    lowyaw Member

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    Go direct, get the best DI box you can afford.
    Then buy whatever software bass amp sim you like - like Amplitube Ampeg sim - and you're golden. Really. IME, 75% of bass tones you hear on the radio, are DI tracks.
     
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  4. brewbaker

    brewbaker Supporting Member

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    Great info. Anymore comments? Going direct for tracking probably will be what I do most of the time but I thought it would be nice to have an amp for live playing while working out arrangements etc. instead of say the drummer and bass player, keyboard and guitar players tied to headphones constantly.
     
  5. olejason

    olejason Supporting Member

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    There really isn't any value in using a cheap amp versus using a nice DI for tracking. Bass players who want to use an amp for tracking are typically playing with distortion or fuzz, hence the preference for a mic over direct. It would be unusual for someone to come in and insist on using an amp but not want to use their amp, you know what I mean?

    Definitely put your money into a nice DI but also look at industry standard pedals (Darkglass B7k, Sansamp, Sansamp VT Bass, etc.) or similar plugins. Very generally, most bass players will want a clean modern tone or an Ampeg style tone (either dirty rock or vintage thumpy). Outside of that they're going to have their own rig and already have tones put together.

    As far as having something in the studio for people to rehearse through I don't think it really matters all that much. I'd probably just get a cheap Hartke or GK rig. I definitely wouldn't put much money into it.
     
  6. FFTT

    FFTT Member

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    What do you have available now in guitar amps?

    Anything 50-100 watts all tube?

    If so, then you would only need a decent bass cab.

    I ask this because a vintage Fender Twin, Hiwatt DR-103, Marshall 50 or 100
    can all serve as a bass recording amp too patched out to a bass cab.

    A Twin is essentially a Bassman 100 with Reverb & Tremolo.
    Paul McCartney used a Bassman 100 for the rooftop concert plus D/I signal.

    For recording bass, you don't so much need big bass amp volume as much as you need tone.
     
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  7. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

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    +1

    you can get some pretty sweet bass tones with regular tube guitar amps pushing bass cabs.
     
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  8. FFTT

    FFTT Member

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    Tis better to use a high quality high headroom guitar amp through a bass cab than to buy
    a novice grade bass amp.

    If you have your heart set on a studio quality bass amp, somewhat reasonable,
    see the post about the new Gries 45 Bass recording amp. A beefed up B15-N circuit delivering 45 watts
    compared to a vintage B15-N delivering 30 watts.
     
  9. georgestrings

    georgestrings Senior Member

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    I agree that using a tube guitar amp and a decent bass cab will work just fine - you can pick up an older Mesa 115(tl606 type) with an EV in it pretty cheap, and that would work quite well... Pair that up with a good quality DI like Radial's J48, JDI, or a Countryman 85 - and you're good to go for not that much money... Some of the best bass sounds I've ever heard were a cab mic'd with a Beta 57 and blended in with one of those DIs...


    - georgestrings
     
  10. sacakl

    sacakl Silver Supporting Member

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    I think the B15N flitops are probably the king for studio recording but they're not cheap. Might be underpowered if playing with others but might not matter if it's just for recording. Depends what your budget is. Agree that an existing guitar head through a bass cab would work, too. I probably would not rule out a DI, since it could give more versatility to those hoping to switch between a vintage and more modern sound.
     
  11. FFTT

    FFTT Member

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    For a D/I the TAB Funkenverk V71 is sweet and all kinds of folks are using the A-Design Reddi.
    Still if you want the sound of a bass played through an amp and speaker, you still need an amp and bass cab.

    Fliptops.net offers a standalone B-15 N cab.
    On a tight budget, a used Thiele with an EVM15L or Mesa Diesel Cab.
    Some guys even like the little Ampeg 2X10AV cab.
     
  12. LanEvo

    LanEvo Member

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    Buy a "Reddi" tube DI for recording and a used Peavey TNT combo for the practice space.
     
  13. Gotham City Blues

    Gotham City Blues Member

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    This. Imagine if it were a bass player asking other bass players "What amp should I have in my studio for a guitarist to use?" You would hear the sound of guitarist's collective heads exploding. Get a quality DI box and if the bassist can't deal then s/he's free to bring their own amp. Done.
     
  14. Endr_rpm

    Endr_rpm Member

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    Nah, you'd hear
    "Get a Fender Hot Rod, a Marshal DSL, and an AC15, and maybe keep a closed back 212 w/ Vin 30s in it around"

    If the guitarists has more esoteric needs, they can bring their own gear.
     
  15. lpdeluxe

    lpdeluxe Member

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    I had a project studio, and my experience was that, unless you have serious acoustic treatment in your room, DI is the way to go to record bass. You will not be dealing with standing waves, uneven bass response, and a hundred other unseen ills.

    Your room may be boomy in ways you can't control, which will give your bass tracks a tubby quality. I was recording in a converted garage apartment, with a raised floor that could not be sealed against external sounds; I ended up running a high-pass filter (set around 250Hzk depending on the key of the song) on all tracks other than bass, which cleaned everything up and gave me a strong bass track with great note definition which I could then mix according to the needs of the song.
     
  16. Gotham City Blues

    Gotham City Blues Member

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    My point exactly. You would hear guitarist's collective heads exploding.
     
  17. FFTT

    FFTT Member

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    Going D/I the player has to exercise much more precision in keeping their attack even, avoiding clacks, buzzes and string squeak.

    Going through an amp and cab helps diffuse some of those artifacts.
     
  18. GSHARP

    GSHARP Member

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    This. I record bass using Mark Studio 2, luv it. No need to break the bank to record at home. It's perfect for demos and stuff. I use Scuffham for my guitars. No need to buy a zillion microphones, spend more time placing mics than actually recording. I always record my demos using simulators.
     
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  19. Bassomatic

    Bassomatic Silver Supporting Member

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    Not if they then run the DI through a top notch amp sim plugin. There are some great ones out there.

    http://www.uaudio.com/store/guitar-bass/ampeg-svt-vr.html
     
  20. FFTT

    FFTT Member

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    Might as well patch my vintage basses through my Bass Rockman.

    With a great sounding vintage bass, I can go D/I and still sound great.

    If I'm going through an amp and cab, I'm using the real deal.
     

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