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Need help with same fret sweep picking

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by 3Sides, Jul 2, 2004.

  1. 3Sides

    3Sides Member

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    OK, when you have a sweep pattern like this one:

    -------------------3—5----------
    -------------- 5--------5—-----
    -------------5-------------5-----
    -------5-7-------------------7---
    -----------------------------------
    -----------------------------------
    How do you get those three adjacent notes on the fifth fret not to bleed into one another? Because you have to roll a single finger, I have never had success with those types, so I try to avoid them. I'm giving them another shot so I thought I would ask for some advice
     
  2. rh

    rh Robo Sapien Noise Maker Gold Supporting Member

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    Could you try a different fingering where there's no roll-over, but instead you use a new finger for each note? There are some great sweepers I know that never use roll-over.
     
  3. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    Yes you could and that works but also rolling the finger over the 3 "barred" notes also works though at extremely fast tempos it's harder to get a separate attack on each. One comment is that you should leave out the last note of your arpeggio in order to preserve the integrity of your sweeping.

    Have you checked out my book which has an extremely comprehensive treatise on sweeping?
     
  4. 3Sides

    3Sides Member

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    Hi Jack, yes i have your book (this is ex.3.6.1 I'm referring to).
    The only part on sweep picking technique is a couple of paragraphs on page vii of the introduction. It doesn't go beyond the basic "one stroke up, one stroke down" theory. Well I geuss I'll guess the "roll" another try
     
  5. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    You can also try a slight muting technique with the right hand which helps separate the notes. I use that in conjunction with the roll technique. Some players (Matte Henderson) always use a separate finger for notes on the same fret but I've never used that technique. Wish I could though. If you can do it, it sounds and works great.
     
  6. Joe

    Joe Senior Member

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    Sweep picking is hard to accomplish, unless it is something you will use a lot, it is barely worth learning IMO. I spent a lot of time learning it and I hardly use it.
     
  7. jzucker

    jzucker Supporting Member

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    Haha - Them's fightin' words Joe!

    I have to disagree with you. Sweeping is an integral part of the guitar's natural language. To ignore it is like picking out a set of letters in the alphabet and saying they're hardly worth learning.

    Even if you're not interested in sweeping speed-metal arpeggios ala Steve Vai, the techniques involved are utilized day-to-day by guitarists as disparate as Stevie Ray Vaughn, Pat Martino and Robben Ford.
     
  8. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    The same could be said of alternate picking, or economy picking, or hybrid picking or of not using a pick at all. Sorry to hear you feel like you wasted your time with it.
     
  9. beePee

    beePee Member

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    it's almost always the "picking" as opposed to just the finger roll(which I think 99.99% sweepers use for this type of arpeggio).

    The 1st note is easy it's making the others "pop"'..and like any thing else.. it's slow meticulous work.

    break it down to the smallest element ....2 notes give both the SAME articulation....now 3 notes...etc.

    next I release the pressure as I roll and make the notes staccato.It can sound like muting but the note has more pop (and you can hear the pitch).......

    personally I feel like Joe for the most part even though I do use it when called for.....it's a tool...thats all...there are many players that abuse it to the point of it sounding like a type writer..it takes the wind out of the sails.I found more linear type stuff much more usefull to me .I mostly only use it for sound articulation... not to increase speed or be flashy.


    BP
     

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