Need Mic For Recording Guitar Amp

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by Ken, Nov 7, 2005.

  1. Ken

    Ken Member

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    I know the Shure SM57 is used, but what else gives good results?

    With Christmas coming, Its time to start giving the wife some ideas! :)

    Thanks
     
  2. onemind

    onemind Member

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    Depending on how generous your wife is...

    Sennheiser E609 A little generous
    Sennheiser MD441 Very Generous
    Royer 121 Ribbon a Keeper!

    (s)
     
  3. Chiba

    Chiba Gold Supporting Member

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    I love the e609 on guitar cabs.

    I would kick over a truckload of nuns for a Royer 121 to use though.

    Sure, there's only $1000 difference in the cost between the two...but ... well, they're JUST nuns.

    --chiba
     
  4. MichaelK

    MichaelK Member

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    No religious discussion, please.
     
  5. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    Yeah, no more discussions about the differences between E609s and SM57s! We don't want this to turn ugly.
     
  6. Ken

    Ken Member

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    One of those two would be the right one in my price range! So lets get this to turn Ugly!

    SM57 vs E609?
     
  7. MichaelK

    MichaelK Member

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    It's just a matter of preference. They're both inexpensive. I don't know if GC still lets you return within 30 days, but if they do, buy both and see which you like better.
     
  8. onemind

    onemind Member

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    MHO...

    The edge goes to the SM57 for versatility....you maybe just want to capture vox....or percussion, etc.

    The edge goes to the E609 for convenience, It just looks cool looped through and hanging down in front of the grillcloth.

    Stir to taste.

    (s)
     
  9. DigitalTube

    DigitalTube Member

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    57's are very good for most cabs, but an MD 421 also works really well for me for guitar, and it's a good mic for other stuff too.
    E.B.
     
  10. Antero

    Antero Member

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    Nothing beats a ribbon. They do have some cheap ones these days - more money than a 57, natch, but it's a much better sound in my never to be humble opinion.
     
  11. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    For no good reason I chose the E609 over the SM57, and I'm quite happy with the results. Probably oughtta get a 57, but I just haven't yet. And I've heard really great things about the 421, so I'll probably give one of those a shot as well, when and if I ever get around to doing some more mic shopping.
     
  12. decay-o-caster

    decay-o-caster Member

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    Greg - Cool - I just might have to take you up on that. Thanks, bro!
     
  13. jcground

    jcground Member

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    We had a nice variety in the studio where I went to college, but the Sennheiser MD421 and Shure SM57 were the most popular to mic cabinets. I've also used an AKG D112 to mic bass cabinets.

    If I could only have one, I would choose the 57 just because I think of it as the vanilla standard. Of course there's a zillion other options, many of them out of my price range.
     
  14. ricoh

    ricoh Member

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    Not intending to steal your thread but what is a good cheap ribbon mic.

    By the way the Sennheiser 421 is my choice for guitar cab miking.

    Rico
     
  15. TAVD

    TAVD Guitar Player Gold Supporting Member

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    Shinybox makes some decent ribbons for little $. Laid back mids, smooth top end and plenty of bass.

    E-H / Octava is supposed to good but I haven't tried one yet.

    E. Kramer used a Beyer m160 on Jimi's amps.

    Back on topic though, the Blue ball is something a bit different. It doesn't work for all my amps but when it does work, it sounds really great.
     
  16. mccreadyisgod

    mccreadyisgod Member

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    For a cranked-Fender sound, I like a 57. Les Paul into a Bassman, Tele into a Twin Reverb, Strat into a Deluxe Reverb... if it's just a Fender amp overdriving itself, or just kinda trebley and gritty, use a 57.

    For a jazzy or big clean tone, use a 421. It's beefy, great proximity response, and clear highs. It's the ultimate clean guitar mic, and good for low-end response. Also my favorite mic for a Fender Rhodes stage piano amp, and not bad on a classic-sounding electric bass.

    For something metal, a Beta 52. Yes, the kick drum mic. With it's big bass response, presence boost, and high-SPL capability, it's awesome.

    The e609 is great for live applications... it's versatile, takes up little space, and gets tight on the cab with a tight pattern for no bleed.

    Truth be known, if I had to choose one mic for guitar cab mic'ing for the rest of my days, it'd be either a 57 or a 421.
     
  17. 1-Take-Wonder

    1-Take-Wonder Member

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    As others have said, It kinda depends on the sound you're going for. That said, 57s are too cheap not to own, and if you're in the rock world you must have one.

    Conventional thinking is that the 57 goes close to the cone to pick up the speaker dynamics, one of the previously mentioned condensers positioned a little farther out to pick up some room ambience and different freqs, and if you have the mics, a third (condenser or ribbon maybe) at a spot in the room where you're getting cool reflected sound.

    I use a a 57 for basic home studio, rock guitar sounds and am looking for a 'deal' on an AT 4033 for vocals, acoustics, and some cab/room mic'ing.
     
  18. mccreadyisgod

    mccreadyisgod Member

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    Mic placement is a huge part of the deal, that's for sure... most people just throw it up in front of a speaker cone and expect that to be sufficient. A 57 can sound dramatically different depending on where it's pointed, at what distance, and what angle. Ask 100 studio engineers (or even live-sound engineers) where to put a 57 on a guitar cab, and you'll get 97 different responses.

    Find your own sweet spots by trying out this experiment: Get a guitar player to play while you are in your booth listening to your monitors and have a friend move the mic around to different spots on the cone, different distances from the grill, and different angles (pointed straight, pointed in, pointed out, etc). Move it to a spot, keep it there a few seconds, take note, and move it to a new place.

    The other way to perform this experiment, if you don't have a booth or don't have two other people, is to put the mic on a stand and move it to different spots and record 10 seconds of playing, then move again, record again, and come back to compare.

    My favorite position for a 57 is to place it halfway between the center of the cone and the edge of the cone, pointed towards the edge of the dust cap, right up against the grill. Good attack, good proximity response. Another popular position is pointed straight into the cone at the edge of the dust cap. Pointing straight into the center of the cone will be trebly and brittle; keeping it pointed straight but moving towards the outside of the cone will mean less treble and more bass. The closer to the grill, the more bass (proximity response) and the further, the thinner. If an amp is sounding boomy, don't be afraid to move the mic back 6-12 inches.

    This is fairly true of all the other mics listed... but it shows how a 57 can do more than one trick if you know how to use it.
     
  19. I have tried just about any mic you can think of and the Shure KSM44 works extremely well on guitar. It is a bit pricey but I think it is well worth the extra dough. You could consider the KSM32 and I have seen some of my buds cut tracks with it. It works awesome on distorted and clean guitars. Also it's great on some vocals, toms (try to get the drummer not to hit it though.) and ok for overheads.

    As far the e609 it is pretty good. However I wouldn't use it for vocals. It does do ok on a snare drum though.

    The SM57 is the standard, however I do not like it because when cutting guitars some of the original signal gets into the phase port and creates a comb filter (phasey sound) which does not sound like the amp to me.

    I've supplied links for more info:

    http://www.shure.com/microphones/models/ksm44.asp
    http://emusician.com/mics/emusic_shure_ksm_2/
    http://www.prorec.com/prorec/articles.nsf/articles/1D68CEF5C599A3F3862569E9001F4E1B
     
  20. Orren

    Orren Member

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    Jesus sets up a Royer and a e609.
    Moses sometimes throws in a condenser or a 57.
    Mohammed selects the mic preamp.
    And Buddha thinks its all good.

    Amen,
    Orren
     

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