Need new fuel for my leads!

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by fuzzbox, Jun 13, 2004.


  1. fuzzbox

    fuzzbox Supporting Member

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    As many of our songs are Major progressions I'm starting to lose creativity and inspiring phrases. Out of ideas, probably cause I'm sick of them. I feel I play the same thing on every tune. Typical I IV progressions all start to sound like some Lynyrd Skynyrd maj pentatonic lines. Minor is always "easier" to feel and I don't repeat my self, but Major always require melodies instead to not sound scale like. I dunno, but for a while now I just hate taking all them solos in Major. Any good ideas on new thinking strategy?
     
  2. HHB

    HHB Member

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    yeah, use the relative minor, if you playing in A major, think F#M and go to town, this is the easiest way to loosen up those major sounds
     
  3. fuzzbox

    fuzzbox Supporting Member

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    Yeah, but that's the trap. Thats why it sound like all southern rock Skynyrd/ABB!
     
  4. HHB

    HHB Member

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    oh, I see. try playin over the changes more, mix in the third of whatever chord your playing w/ the major pent. sclae. Also , try using mixolydian in place of the major pentatonic
     
  5. Tom Gross

    Tom Gross Supporting Member

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    If you think about it from a diatonic tip, there are 3 minor tonalities related to a major key - the ii, the iii, and the vi. So you can go 3 frets down from the root, 2 frets up from the root, or 4 frets up from the root, and find some places to do minor stuff.
    For example, in D major, you've got B min, E min, and F#min. Now for each of these, you can play minor triads, min7 arpeggios, and minor pentatonics.

    Just something to try.
     
  6. sws1

    sws1 Member

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    Does that mean I can play B min pentatonic against a D?
     
  7. HHB

    HHB Member

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    yep, B minor pentatonic is the same group of notes as D major pentatonic, if you play B minor pent over D, you'll have that southern rock country sound he's trying to get away from,
     
  8. Mark C

    Mark C Member

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    Try some chromatic notes.
    Utilize the minor 3rd to major 3rd, diminished fifth to perfect fifth and minor seventh to major seventh.

    Try listening to some hot country players to hear some of these ideas. Through a cranked up amp, they sound cool for playing rock over a Lynrd Skynrd style setting.
     
  9. sws1

    sws1 Member

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    Now that you answered the question, I realized that I already knew that. Boy, what a dumb question. I must have misread your original post.
     
  10. HHB

    HHB Member

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    my posts are confusing, my mind races beyond my typing skills , so I'm sure I'm confusing as hell LOL
     
  11. Dr. Jimmy

    Dr. Jimmy Member

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  12. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    Only by listening to a player that inspires you.
     
  13. splatt

    splatt david torn / splattercell Gold Supporting Member

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    wow.
    back from the dead after 10 years.....
     
  14. Motterpaul

    Motterpaul Tone is in the Ears

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    I like mixolydian over major chords - its a very sweet scale with its suspended notes. One way to look at it is like this...

    Sat you are in A major, try playing the E-minor blues scale over A-major (leave out the Bb) but just play the notes (starting on D-string 14th fret)

    E F# G A B C# D E F# G A


    0 2 3
    0 2 3
    0 2
    0 2
    0 2
    0 2 3
     
  15. weenerdoggs

    weenerdoggs What's Up Dogg? Supporting Member

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    I think you have got some great technical advice and good stuff so far.

    You might also try taking a little break and doing a good listening session. Try to mix in some new material and hold on to the tones you like.

    I also will do the same when I reach a stumbling zone, switch up technique, maybe pick up the slide, or explore a new effect.

    Lastly, I like play to the changes and in so don't hesitate to use the chords/chord shapes/parts of chords while doing so. If that doesn't work you might want to write some new material that captures more of your current feel (this could be a great moment).

    Have Fun

    ;)
     
  16. Frank Prince

    Frank Prince Member

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    To throw a different slant into the thread, start concentrating on rhythms. One of the BIG reasons any set of scales or melodic sequences can start to sound samey is that there is not much rhythmic variance.

    Start listening to how vocalists phrase major scale based melodies and lines in all styles, learn some of those lines, and then start changing the rhythms around. You can find cool examples to start with in anything from Christmas tunes to nursery rhymes to southern rock to world music styles.
     

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