Need some advice on DAW software choices...

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by doc, Jan 17, 2015.

  1. doc

    doc Member

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    I have an older copy of Reason (not seriously out of date - it has Record embedded), and have downloaded Reaper but haven't really messed with it yet. I've made a couple of abortive attempts to learn to use Reason, but limited success so far. Should I just update Reason and plow ahead, or would I be able to do more with less effort by putting that aside for now and switching to Prosonus Studio One Pro with plan to later Rewire Reason into it to use some of the instruments? I want to do some simple recordings including guitar, vocal, and MIDI/soft synth (some using a Fishman Triple Play) instruments first, make some backing tracks for use with my band, and eventually work my way up to pro sounding recordings for distribution to my tens of adoring fans. I currently have a decent Windows PC and an M-Audio box, a couple of mics, a couple of older hardware mixers, and nice stereo for playback. The emphasis for me is on ease of use and an easy learning curve, along with the fewest technical hang ups (like getting it to talk to my Triple Play and other hardware).
     
  2. theroan

    theroan Member

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    I'm in a similar boat with Omnisphere. There is so much you can do with it, it's hard to know where to start. I think a good course of action is to pursue what you know how to do already. Guitar, vocals, whatever presets that are easy to dial and in and use. Once you've figured out what you can do with what you know the next question is "what's missing from my song and how can Reason fill that gap". Once you know what you're looking to accomplish it may be easier to search for that specific item online.
     
  3. kcprogguitar

    kcprogguitar Member

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    I found Studio One pretty easy to get going. However, unfortunately, I've come to realize that my talents as an engineer are limited.

    Shame really. I really like this stuff, too.

    Sorry for the derailment.
     
  4. treeofpain

    treeofpain Supporting Member

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    I know that each software package has its strengths and weaknesses. Some programs are very deep with tons of options, but they can be harder to learn up-front.

    When I bought, I told my rep that I wanted a good package, but the main thing was ease of use from the beginning, so I could start recording immediately and build some momentum. He recommended Studio One.

    Studio One is very, very easy to use. Very intuitive, and you get a pretty good suite of plug-ins with even the basic versions. I tried out Pro Tools and Cubase, and S1 was just easier to learn quickly.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2015
  5. MoPho

    MoPho International Man of Leisure Silver Supporting Member

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    A vote for Reaper here. I've stepped foot into several studios but all I've done is step foot into them. I have inexpensive gear (interface is a Line 6 UX8) at home and I've enjoyed laying down some guitar tracks for future exploration. My 18yo daughter who doesn't know jack about recording, goes in and fires up Reaper and can lay down a mic'd acoustic guitar and vocal track, add some keys and produce a fine sounding song she and I are both proud of yet they aren't mastered or effected. She invites a friend over and lays down more vocal tracks. I've been picking up some mics to record acoustic drums so I can accompany them. Until now My daughter has used midi grooves that come with Toontrack Superior Drummer. She wants Dad's touch added to the songs so I've recorded some bass and will add drums when the mics come in.

    My point here is that Reaper is a fantastic DAW for even peeps like us who've never sat behind a console much less laid down tracks in an acoustically superior studio. I had to learn Toontrack Superior Drummer but Reaper's workflow allowed these novices to cut to "tape" with effectively zero experience.

    It's been very rewarding to do this as my daughter goes off to college next fall and this was something we had a pact to do. Only GarageBand was easier to mess with, but it was purpose built to do that. We needed more flexibility and a rabbit hole available should we eventually choose to dive deep.
     
  6. Mr God

    Mr God Member

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    Reaper is technically the most advanced DAW on the market, and costs the least. A true bargain. It's updated frequently, performs better, more features, etc.

    The user interface isn't the best one ever but it's not that bad.
     
  7. GuitarsFromMars

    GuitarsFromMars Member

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    Been using Cubase for a long time (started with SX3). There is a steep learning curve with most of them. Pro Tools is the standard and there are several others.

    Once you understand the basic operation of the DAW, you can switch to others(brands/models) based on features and affordability.
     
  8. Xian Forbes

    Xian Forbes Member

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    I was on cubase for a few years but have since switched to Ableton. It does things no other daw can do.
     
  9. doc

    doc Member

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    I apparently have a copy of Studio One Artist here somewhere - I think I'll probably load that and try it for awhile. I guess that version won't allow me to link it to Reason, but if things are going well with recording from mics and Triple Play I can upgrade later to Pro.
     
  10. Serious Poo

    Serious Poo Armchair Rocket Scientist Graffiti Existentialist Gold Supporting Member

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    If you're just recording for yourself, there are so many great tools out there it's kind of hard to go wrong with any of em IMHO. If you want to collaborate with others, however, it seems like ProTools is still the primary platform to use.
     
  11. Rex Anderson

    Rex Anderson Member

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    Samplitude is very powerful. I used Sequoia (the pro version) for all of my professional work, recording, mixing, editing, mastering. Samplitude comes close.

    I have not used Reaper, but hear it is pretty much what Mr. God says it is.
     
  12. jonnytexas

    jonnytexas Supporting Member

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    [SOUNDCLOUD]https://soundcloud.com/jonnytexas/down-home-blues[/SOUNDCLOUD]

    This was done on reaper at a bar gig. I added a little reverb to the vocals and messed with the kick drum. Reaper is a fantastic program. I know my playing sucks, haha
     
  13. Mr God

    Mr God Member

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    It's pretty insane actually. Lots of people at Gearslutz (who are high-end producers with access to insane amounts of money) are moving from their Pro Tools rigs to Reaper. :bow

    Add to that there's updates to Reaper every month adding useful things.
     
  14. Rex Anderson

    Rex Anderson Member

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    I told a friend of mine who uses Reaper about source/destination editing in Sequoia. He said he thought he could do that in Reaper too. If that is true and it works well, Reaper is a heck of a deal because Sequoia is very expensive compared to Samplitude just because of the 4 point source/destination editing paradigm it offers.
     
  15. JonRock

    JonRock Member

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    no clue what source/dest editing is...but http://forum.cockos.com/showthread.php?t=86460

    http://imageshack.com/e/p5aMES7Yj
     
  16. andybaylor

    andybaylor Supporting Member

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    Really? Who?

    Please, do tell.

    A-list releases done on Reaper? I found nothing.

    ++++++++++++++++++++++

    Pro Tools is an easy sell. It's been #1 forever. ​

    The others, not so much. Maybe Logic? I've heard major names using Logic.

    It's the Klon of cut and paste in a DAW.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2015
  17. Xian Forbes

    Xian Forbes Member

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    I'm sure there is a few Frooty Loops users that also use Reaper... You know, for that Wub Wub Wub dubstep.
     
  18. speedemon

    speedemon Member

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    Pro Tools is the defacto if you are going to take other people's money, or interface with big studios. I am pretty new, and use Reaper because; it is easy to learn, there is lots of "support", it was dirt cheap, it doesn't make problems, runs every freebee plugin I have grabbed smoothly. The free and frequent updates are nice and I install them, but I have yet to discover what was in any of them, what they fixed, or what I would like to have.
    Good luck!
     
  19. JonRock

    JonRock Member

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    kool, now I gotta figure out what Klon is hehe
     
  20. andybaylor

    andybaylor Supporting Member

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    You don't want to know. Trust me.
     

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