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Need something that will 'cut' live

traynor_garnet

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,097
A classic problem I know, but I jammed last night and could not cut through will my solos. I could get plenty loud, but I still could not cut through. My rig was a Strat, Rat, Timmy, BB Preamp, into a 1965 Traynor Bassmaster.

Any suggestions?

TG
 

LaceSensor1

Member
Messages
3,711
Based on your gear you have the weapons needed already. It sounds like you might need to turn your gain down and your volume up.

I'd start by setting your amp a bit louder and lowering the gain on your RAT. Boost with the BB by keeping the gain near 0 and volume as needed to sit in the mix.

You certainly don't need all 3 overdrives on, and this might actually make it harder to be heard. When too much gain is used, the notes start to get lost in the mix.

I'd suggest Strat -> Rat (gain no more than 12 o'clock) -> BB (gain near 0). Use you guitar volume to lower the gain as needed. Use the BB to boost for solo's where you need to jump out in the mix.
 

traynor_garnet

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,097
Not a ton of gain going on. Amp barely breaking up, BB preamp at moderate gain.

The EQ is an interesting option.

TG
 

244300

Let’s meet up in Phoenix and play some rawk!
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,618
Too much compression will flatten the sound and you lose your dynamics. Back off the gain if you haven't already.

Too many frequencies is too much sound and it just gets lost. Cut the ones you don't want and or boost the ones you need.

Don't forget the controls on the guitar. If they are all on ten, that's counterproductive.
 

WillLane

Member
Messages
2,340
A classic problem I know, but I jammed last night and could not cut through will my solos. I could get plenty loud, but I still could not cut through. My rig was a Strat, Rat, Timmy, BB Preamp, into a 1965 Traynor Bassmaster.

Sounds like a settings problem, although I'm unfamiliar with the amp; if it is a bass amp you may actually need a boost in the mids. I'd be careful about running too much bass through the amp, as that will bias your perception of how loud it is. The bass of the guitar will get covered up by the bass guitar and kick drum, leaving you no energy in the midrange or highs.
 
Messages
188
What's the context you're not cutting through? Is it you, a bassist, and a drummer? Or is it three guitarists, a piano player, horns, and drums? Big difference here.

Agreed on the above comment about bass. In the mix, your bass settings is often the mud knob.
 

Tiny Montgomery

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,850
Too much compression will flatten the sound and you lose your dynamics. Back off the gain if you haven't already.

Too many frequencies is too much sound and it just gets lost. Cut the ones you don't want and or boost the ones you need.

Don't forget the controls on the guitar. If they are all on ten, that's counterproductive.
“Counterproductive” to what? Cutting highs is rarely going to help cut through.
 

Tiny Montgomery

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,850
Too much gain/compression. The articulation in the upper freq. will be lost and start to sound like an undefined mush of distortion.
Counterproductive to too much gain and compression? I’m confused. All other things being equal, cutting treble is seldom, if ever, going to help cut through a mix. Gain and compression are downstream.
 

ripgtr

Member
Messages
11,113
You got a strat and a timmy. I would use the various OD pedals for different sounds, I don't often use more than one on at a time, though I am hip to stacking (it depends on the band/sound/pedals/settings, yada yada). Too much of that and you end up with a mess.

Use the bridge pickup, dial in the timmy and amp for the fatness to fill it out.
If you can't cut with a strat on the bridge, there is something else going on.

Note: are you Sure you are not cutting through? Like did someone do a phone vid and your stuff was buried? Because live, with a band going at it, you are not going to hear yourself like at home.

Note 2: You mention "with solos". You should be turned down for rhythm/backing parts and turn up for solos. You need somewhere to go. If you are full out at the right volume on rhythm, no way are your solos going to be loud enough without your rhythm being way too loud.
 

modernp

Member
Messages
2,447
I don't think I have ever had a problem cutting with a strat. Especially on the bridge for leads.
 

LaceSensor1

Member
Messages
3,711
Counterproductive to too much gain and compression? I’m confused. All other things being equal, cutting treble is seldom, if ever, going to help cut through a mix. Gain and compression are downstream.

I guess I'd call it "the Big Muff effect". When using overdrive/distortion, at a certain gain level the highs will just turn into a washed out mess which does not help you to cut through a mix b/c the notes cannot even be heard through the wall of distortion. If we are talking clean guitar sounds sure the treble would help it poke out.
 

244300

Let’s meet up in Phoenix and play some rawk!
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,618
“Counterproductive” to what? Cutting highs is rarely going to help cut through.

Please note I didn't specifically state to turn down the tone knob on the guitar.

The guitar and amp controls are interrelated. Too much or too little volume or tone from the guitar knobs can be a problem DEPENDING on how the amp is set.

Too much gain/compression. The articulation in the upper freq. will be lost and start to sound like an undefined mush of distortion.

This is a good example.

Counterproductive to too much gain and compression? I’m confused. All other things being equal, cutting treble is seldom, if ever, going to help cut through a mix. Gain and compression are downstream.

It depends. If someone has the amp set with a lot of mids, turning up the tone knob all the way won't necessarily cut through the mix more and or sound better.

Think of it this way. All of the below settings will "cut" through the mix better than bass 10, mids 10, treble 10 or bass 0, mids 10, treble 10.

Bass 10, mids 3, treble 2*
Bass 0, mids 10, treble 5
Bass 0, mids 5, treble 10

*Cranked bass will probably not sound good on guitar.
 

Jr Deluxe

Member
Messages
3,414
You need a clean boost for solos to make you louder. As opposed to a gain boost. Learn to pick notes instead of relying on gain. Then your sound will be more DYNAMIC like a saxophone. Have you ever heard a sax not cut through? Unamplified most of the time even. Or maybe what you need to cut is one of the other musicians if youre all so loud a traynor gets buried.
 

amdowell

Fat Dad
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,061
I echo those who suggested the GE-7. Nothing better than an EQ at the end of your chain with the mids goosed a bit and a tad of bottom pulled out. You don't have to be louder, just cut with the right frequencies.
 

Bob T.

Member
Messages
2,995
I'll also pile on with the EQ suggestion. You can put it at the end of the dirt to bring in some great upper midrange/lower treble content. You could also put that same EQ in front of the dirt, boosting the same mid/treble frequencies, and slam it with some output to also add some gain should you need it (might not be super helpful in your situation, though).

Want a little more dirt and compression, but still be heard no matter what? Treble booster in front of everything. You're welcome :wave

YBA-1s are the bomb. Wishing I didn't have to sell mine :cry:
 




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