New BOSS GT-1000 Guitar Effects Processor

DS007

Member
Messages
991
The Boss sound is still not for me....don't know what it is, but I heard the same sort of sound in the GT100 that just doesn't connect (with me personally) Should be a great unit though! Congrats to those who are picking one up ;)
 

ShaunzNoiz

Member
Messages
204
Spent some quality time (today) with the GT-1000.
The selection of Amps, Mics, Cabs isn't extensive.
That said, you can dial in a Marshall style heavy crunch sound that can hold its own with the Axe-FX, Helix, and HeadRush (I've owned them all - have the Helix and HeadRush comparing side-by-side).
The UI (without the editor) is a bit of a PITA when compared to Helix and HeadRush. Once you're comfortable, it's not too bad to navigate thru the pages.
If you're looking to absolutely nail a specific amp, GT-1000 probably isn't going to do it for you (at least not with the current sparse selection of models).

The GT-1000 is (IMO) a substantial improvement Amp/Cab wise over the GT-100. I could hear/feel the difference immediately.
I wouldn't base any real decision on the GT-1000 without auditioning it for yourself... in your environment... with your gear.
Response to dynamics is actually pretty decent.
The onboard Cabs (again) aren't extensive... but they'll certainly get the job done (for those who don't want to fool with IRs).
There's plenty of DSP processing power and routing flexibility.

Though the GT-1000 offers nowhere near the vast amp/cab options of Axe-FX and Helix, it's enough to get the job done.
Competition is tough at the $1000 mark.
Helix LT is loaded with features/models and has a great UI.
HeadRush (with good IRs and filtering out aliasing noise) sounds good and is super easy to use.
GT-1000 is not a "Axe-FX or Helix killer"... but you can program and use it for direct to FOH gigs (and recording)... and sound very good.
As you'd expect, the selection of EFX is extensive... and of high quality.
The acoustic simulator is a slight improvement (to my ears) over previous generations (and especially the pedal). There's no audible noise when using it (whereas the pedal is particularly noisy).

On tight stages, the smaller form-factor of the GT-1000 (verses the Helix or HeadRush) is particularly welcome.
The power-adapter is a drag...
Build quality feels sturdy.
Monochrome screen seems a bit antiquated (by today's large/bright color screen standards). With the editor (including Bluetooth for tables/smart-phones), this will be less of an issue.

If you're looking for a guitar processor around the $1000 mark, check out the GT-1000 (as well as the others).

This. As I said in an earlier post, if you like Boss effects, this thing is a huge leap forward for them. I just bought the HX effects. I may pick this thing up. Just for its size alone.
 

mmmazzz

Member
Messages
245
Spent some quality time (today) with the GT-1000.
The selection of Amps, Mics, Cabs isn't extensive.
That said, you can dial in a Marshall style heavy crunch sound that can hold its own with the Axe-FX, Helix, and HeadRush (I've owned them all - have the Helix and HeadRush comparing side-by-side).
The UI (without the editor) is a bit of a PITA when compared to Helix and HeadRush. Once you're comfortable, it's not too bad to navigate thru the pages.
If you're looking to absolutely nail a specific amp, GT-1000 probably isn't going to do it for you (at least not with the current sparse selection of models).

The GT-1000 is (IMO) a substantial improvement Amp/Cab wise over the GT-100. I could hear/feel the difference immediately.
I wouldn't base any real decision on the GT-1000 without auditioning it for yourself... in your environment... with your gear.
Response to dynamics is actually pretty decent.
The onboard Cabs (again) aren't extensive... but they'll certainly get the job done (for those who don't want to fool with IRs).
There's plenty of DSP processing power and routing flexibility.

Though the GT-1000 offers nowhere near the vast amp/cab options of Axe-FX and Helix, it's enough to get the job done.
Competition is tough at the $1000 mark.
Helix LT is loaded with features/models and has a great UI.
HeadRush (with good IRs and filtering out aliasing noise) sounds good and is super easy to use.
GT-1000 is not a "Axe-FX or Helix killer"... but you can program and use it for direct to FOH gigs (and recording)... and sound very good.
As you'd expect, the selection of EFX is extensive... and of high quality.
The acoustic simulator is a slight improvement (to my ears) over previous generations (and especially the pedal). There's no audible noise when using it (whereas the pedal is particularly noisy).

On tight stages, the smaller form-factor of the GT-1000 (verses the Helix or HeadRush) is particularly welcome.
The power-adapter is a drag...
Build quality feels sturdy.
Monochrome screen seems a bit antiquated (by today's large/bright color screen standards). With the editor (including Bluetooth for tables/smart-phones), this will be less of an issue.

If you're looking for a guitar processor around the $1000 mark, check out the GT-1000 (as well as the others).

Thank you very much for sharing this. I found it very informative. Cheers!
 

FuzzFacetious

Member
Messages
2,201
I think the big difference here is that Line 6 and Headrush make modellers with effects in, while Boss make multieffects, with amp and cab modelling in. The fact that it is shown to be likely to get continual support like the other units, that it has IRs as well as a new tech (AIRD) and that it is getting good reviews from people that have used it show that it has potential to smash it... Just gotta hope for more decent demos and WIN.
 

DigiPOV

Member
Messages
2,450
I like Ola’s vids, but his metal tones created on cheap gear are merely passable, not an indicator of good metal tone. Too many blooz guitarists think metal is just fizz distortion and teenage angst. This is because they’ve not bothered to check out MATURE metal offerings. You’ll find superb tone and actually hear guitarists do more than pitchy bends and pentatonic scales. Sigh.

Im not a blooz player, I do instrumental rock, Satriani, Vai, etc. I started playing metal way back when, but graduated from Metallica when I got into more challenging material.

After 25 years of playing, various amps, pedals, MFX, across a few decades, I know what goes into crafting a tone. There is nothing special about what is considered "good" modern metal. We can debate pick attack, dynamics, gain level, etc, but all high gain amps derive from one or two circuits. With proper gain staging, EQ, and ability to control stereo spread, modern metal is not difficult to dial in.

One thing to understand is that its not even a "real" amp sound; its based upon a stereo delay effect. Getting the amp tuned to the unique register of a downtuned seven string is going to be the only issue. The tone stack of some classic amps are not always ideal for lower register guitars, but with a 10-band graphic and parametric you don't need to rely upon the built in tone stack.

My main amp is a Laney Ironheart which is regarded as a good modern metal amp, but I use it more along the lines of Jack Thamarrat, standard tuned six. I love this amp because the push pull pots can move the frequency of each EQ band for whatever tuning you are into. I've been able to perfectly clone the Ironheart preamp with the GT100. I could easily use the GT or the Laney to make a modern metal demo, but I don't have any downtuned guitars.

Its not as difficult or special as you think. There are hundreds of youtube videos that show how to get the sound, how to dialin the amp(plugin), what EQ settings to use, how to set the stereo spread, how to set the mastering compressor, etc. Its paint by numbers.
 

Darkness

Member
Messages
2,388
Im not a blooz player, I do instrumental rock, Satriani, Vai, etc. I started playing metal way back when, but graduated from Metallica when I got into more challenging material.

After 25 years of playing, various amps, pedals, MFX, across a few decades, I know what goes into crafting a tone. There is nothing special about what is considered "good" modern metal. We can debate pick attack, dynamics, gain level, etc, but all high gain amps derive from one or two circuits. With proper gain staging, EQ, and ability to control stereo spread, modern metal is not difficult to dial in.

One thing to understand is that its not even a "real" amp sound; its based upon a stereo delay effect. Getting the amp tuned to the unique register of a downtuned seven string is going to be the only issue. The tone stack of some classic amps are not always ideal for lower register guitars, but with a 10-band graphic and parametric you don't need to rely upon the built in tone stack.

My main amp is a Laney Ironheart which is regarded as a good modern metal amp, but I use it more along the lines of Jack Thamarrat, standard tuned six. I love this amp because the push pull pots can move the frequency of each EQ band for whatever tuning you are into. I've been able to perfectly clone the Ironheart preamp with the GT100. I could easily use the GT or the Laney to make a modern metal demo, but I don't have any downtuned guitars.

Its not as difficult or special as you think. There are hundreds of youtube videos that show how to get the sound, how to dialin the amp(plugin), what EQ settings to use, how to set the stereo spread, how to set the mastering compressor, etc. Its paint by numbers.
Okay. So you totally disregard my point about listening to mature metal, then go on to rant about a decent Laney amp, and how modern metal, which is one of many metal genres, sound is “paint by number.”

Correct me if I’m wrong, I may be, but this sure seems like musical tone snobbery. I get the impression, again correct me if I’m wrong, that your chosen genre of music takes far more quality gear to get the sound.

I’m not bagging on you though. I just can’t stand players saying their music needs good gear, but metal can be made with cheap garbage gear. The pendulum swings both ways for that. Your Satch, Vai, Malmsteen virtuoso group (I dig them all BTW) wouldn’t be caught dead playing or recording serious music with garbage amps.
 

DigiPOV

Member
Messages
2,450
Okay. So you totally disregard my point about listening to mature metal, then go on to rant about a decent Laney amp, and how modern metal, which is one of many metal genres, sound is “paint by number.”

Correct me if I’m wrong, I may be, but this sure seems like musical tone snobbery. I get the impression, again correct me if I’m wrong, that your chosen genre of music takes far more quality gear to get the sound.

I’m not bagging on you though. I just can’t stand players saying their music needs good gear, but metal can be made with cheap garbage gear. The pendulum swings both ways for that. Your Satch, Vai, Malmsteen virtuoso group (I dig them all BTW) wouldn’t be caught dead playing or recording serious music with garbage amps.
The production of the guitar sounds for modern metal is largely paint by numbers. Just like modern country guitar has a "sound". Im not talking about the music itself.

Im not a gear snob. I can get great Satch sounds with a DS-1 pedal into basically any half stack and an SM57. Good tones don't take great or expensive gear.

To say the GT1000 can't get great metal is a really crazy thing to say. At a minimum you could start with the Dual Rec or 5150 model, use the 10band eq with shelving and the mixer's stereo spread feature to customize the tone. If the gain staging is not right, you can change the gain setting on the amp sim to "low" and experiment with other gain stages in the form of an OD or dist pedal in front of the amp. If you don't like the presentation of the final sound, load up some IRs. There are alot of factors that go into modern metal besides the amp itself. Modern metal is a produced style; real amps don't sound like that.

Compare that to tones/styles that are traditionally gotten with just an amp and a mic. Everything is laid bare, the sound doesn't come from clever use of stereo spread. There is much less compression. Much less distortion, the tone sounds much more like the guitar itself. The goal is to capture the sound of the amp in the room as if you were there.

Thats why the GT1000 demos are impressive to me. I already know it can do highly produced styles, but are the basic mono amp sounds credible? Do they sound like an amp in the room? The answer is yes, very much.

This is probably why the majority of tones in the demos are across a range of styles, with very little metal.
 

Darkness

Member
Messages
2,388
Im not a gear snob. I can get great Satch sounds with a DS-1 pedal into basically any half stack and an SM57. Good tones don't take great or expensive gear.

To say the GT1000 can't get great metal is a really crazy thing to say. At a minimum you could start with the Dual Rec or 5150 model, use the 10band eq with shelving and the mixer's stereo spread feature to customize the tone. If the gain staging is not right, you can change the gain setting on the amp sim to "low" and experiment with other gain stages in the form of an OD or dist pedal in front of the amp. If you don't like the presentation of the final sound, load up some IRs. There are alot of factors that go into modern metal besides the amp itself. Modern metal is a produced style; real amps don't sound like that.

Compare that to tones/styles that are traditionally gotten with just an amp and a mic. Everything is laid bare, the sound doesn't come from clever use of stereo spread. There is much less compression. Much less distortion, the tone sounds much more like the guitar itself. The goal is to capture the sound of the amp in the room as if you were there.

Thats why the GT1000 demos are impressive to me. I already know it can do highly produced styles, but are the basic mono amp sounds credible? Do they sound like an amp in the room? The answer is yes, very much.

This is probably why the majority of tones in the demos are across a range of styles, with very little metal.
Thanks for clarifying. I agree with you. As for whether or not the new Boss unit will deliver, I think we are going to see it evolve like the Helix, so it’s way too early to heap praise or scorn on it. In the long run, I hope it’s a big seller that delivers great tones for the user.

I don’t care who puts out good gear, just that we all get choices.

Rock on.
 

mikah912

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,956
Im not a blooz player, I do instrumental rock, Satriani, Vai, etc. I started playing metal way back when, but graduated from Metallica when I got into more challenging material.

After 25 years of playing, various amps, pedals, MFX, across a few decades, I know what goes into crafting a tone. There is nothing special about what is considered "good" modern metal. We can debate pick attack, dynamics, gain level, etc, but all high gain amps derive from one or two circuits. With proper gain staging, EQ, and ability to control stereo spread, modern metal is not difficult to dial in.

One thing to understand is that its not even a "real" amp sound; its based upon a stereo delay effect. Getting the amp tuned to the unique register of a downtuned seven string is going to be the only issue. The tone stack of some classic amps are not always ideal for lower register guitars, but with a 10-band graphic and parametric you don't need to rely upon the built in tone stack.

My main amp is a Laney Ironheart which is regarded as a good modern metal amp, but I use it more along the lines of Jack Thamarrat, standard tuned six. I love this amp because the push pull pots can move the frequency of each EQ band for whatever tuning you are into. I've been able to perfectly clone the Ironheart preamp with the GT100. I could easily use the GT or the Laney to make a modern metal demo, but I don't have any downtuned guitars.

Its not as difficult or special as you think. There are hundreds of youtube videos that show how to get the sound, how to dialin the amp(plugin), what EQ settings to use, how to set the stereo spread, how to set the mastering compressor, etc. Its paint by numbers.

There's not a "the" modern metal sound. Rings of Saturn is a modern metal band. So is Nile. So is High on Fire. So is Periphery. So is Revocation. None of those groups sound like each other or use the same gear. They don't tune the same.
 

Elantric

Member
Messages
12,309
And all this time, I thought these two guys were the last word on Metal Tones ;)



 
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DS007

Member
Messages
991
The EXCELLENT ultra MODERN metal tone is actually one of the hardest to get 100% right IMO. It can be approximated, but to get the power, punch and clarity at the same exact time as producing clear high gain single note riffs in low tunings is a fine line. I've heard it wrong and right, and both are close together....that fine line is the hardest part.
 

Jim Roseberry

Member
Messages
1,957
Thanks for that great summation!

Can the looper be moved in the fx chain or does it live at the end? It’s not clear in the manual one way or the other and I don’t have a gt-100 as a past-unit reference point

Also, any thoughts on pitch-shifting? I have GT-8 and (again) can’t compare to gt-100 butvthe gt-8 pitch algos are pretty dicey. Not sure if it’s on par with the H9 I’d like to sell but, if the 1000 is better than the 8 in this regard, I may be able to deal :)

Thanks again for the review!

Polyphonic pitch-shifting (down a half-step) has some warbling... but it's much improved vs. the GT-100.
If you just need to get thru a tune or two (distorted parts), you could make it work.
The Drop pedal sounds cleaner.
The Helix polyphonic pitch-shifting (IMO) is about the same.
HeadRush pitch-shift can't do polyphonic shifting clean enough (IMO) to be useful for dropping a half-step.

The Looper block can indeed be moved.
 

Darkness

Member
Messages
2,388
You reverenced it a few times. Can you link or name some albums/songs of "mature metal"?
I’ll give you one example. Here’s an accessible ‘commercial’ band to try:
Insomnium - Winters Gate

Most of the stuff I prefer, when I’m listening to metal, is much, much heavier and darker. I think the music would be a tad much for metal neophytes. Like any genre of music, there are many levels of complexity to metal. Most of what people think of as metal are hard rock bands like Slipknot (weak) and Metallica. Yeah, I don’t classify them as metal any more.
 

Jim Roseberry

Member
Messages
1,957
Regarding the GT-1000's tuner:
The tuner is IMO better (more stable) than the tuners in both Helix and HeadRush.
HeadRush's tuner is slightly more stable than the one in Helix.
The GT-1000's tuner has simultaneous monophonic and polyphonic displays.
 

Lord N

Member
Messages
2,577
I’ll give you one example. Here’s an accessible ‘commercial’ band to try:
Insomnium - Winters Gate
Thanks! :aok

Most of the stuff I prefer, when I’m listening to metal, is much, much heavier and darker. I think the music would be a tad much for metal neophytes. Like any genre of music, there are many levels of complexity to metal. Most of what people think of as metal are hard rock bands like Slipknot (weak) and Metallica. Yeah, I don’t classify them as metal any more.
Well... that didn't sound pretentious at all!
 

Elantric

Member
Messages
12,309
Polyphonic pitch-shifting (down a half-step) has some warbling... but it's much improved vs. the GT-100.
If you just need to get thru a tune or two (distorted parts), you could make it work.
.
xv1kltvvnqmmapjoyn9n.jpg

How would the GT-1000 Poly Pitch shifter compare to the Digitech Whammy DT in regards to use as a 1/2 step drop tune solution for an entire song ?
 

Darkness

Member
Messages
2,388
Thanks! :aok


Well... that didn't sound pretentious at all!
Not pretentious in the least. My comment simplified:

Insomnium “Winters Gate” is a good place to start. What I usually listen to isn’t something I’d recommend to someone asking about metal.

Better?
 




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