New Mic - EQ Question

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by Steve Berger, Jul 16, 2008.

  1. Steve Berger

    Steve Berger Member

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    I just got a new Rode NT2A mic. It has a High Pass Filter switch that I can either leave "unchanged" or set so that it will roll-off 3 dB "up to and including the selected frequency" . . . at either "40Hz" or "80 Hz"

    My question is :which setting will give me the most significant bass roll-off or reduction . . . "40Hz" or "80Hz"?

    For sure I tried to determine this myself by just listening to both my vocal and to my acoustic guitar through my headphones, but I was not really able to discern a difference. Bad hearing I guess.[​IMG]

    Also . . . I know this is subjective and also depends on the particular acoustic guitar and voice being recorded . . . but all thing being equal and in a general sense . . .which setting is usually better for recording a male vocal and for recording an acoustic guitar?
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  2. paulgroove82

    paulgroove82 Supporting Member

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    80hz is going to take more low end away, however, if you're not having a lot of trouble with a boomy bottom end, eq it out after the fact and avoind the HPF. Far better to have the low end to take away later than to try and boost it up - you will get woofy issues then.
     
  3. rob2001

    rob2001 Member

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    Chances are your vocal and/or acoustic tracks never produced freqencies low enough to attenuate. Thats probably why you didn't hear a difference. If you were mic'ing a bass cab or a drum kit that would be more obvious.
     
  4. Bryan T

    Bryan T Guitar Owner Silver Supporting Member

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    Rolling off those low frequencies can get rid of 'rumble' on the track - basically all the low end garbage in your recording environment. Some folks like to remove it at the source, some with an EQ during tracking, some during post. While you may not notice it on a single track, it'll definitely add up if you are multi-tracking.

    You can also use the roll off if you are getting too much proximity effect when tracking.

    Bryan
     
  5. kludge

    kludge The droid you're looking for

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    +1. A lot of the things that make GOOD gear (and good technique like roll-off filters) isn't apparent when soloing a track. You'll hear it in the context of a mix, though - or rather, you WON'T hear it. This is especially true of the rumble and room noise you're filtering out with that rolloff switch. I ALWAYS keep that switch on, unless I'm recording something that has real low-end content.
     
  6. thesedaze

    thesedaze Member

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    +1 on the tough to notice when soloing, but also...this may or may not apply...I wouldn't attribute you not being able to notice it by ear to bad hearing as much as I would a bad recording and mixing room...these subtleties become obvious in a good studio, which is a big reason why a lot of big studios are a bit discouraging on the whole home-recording boom...I definitely see their point. I can only imagine being a mixing engineer for one of the studios that takes in 'home-made' recordings done on some PT LE gear in a bedroom. That's gotta be painful.
     
  7. Steve Berger

    Steve Berger Member

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    Hey everyone . . . thanks for all of your feedback (pun intended). I got lots of good info to think about.
     
  8. MichaelK

    MichaelK Member

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    Zackly so...

    But you might feel the difference even in tracks that you wouldn't think might be affected, like vocals. So you might want to check it out both ways, listen closely before you make the call.

    40 Hz. should kill all sub-sub-bass content pretty well. 80 Hz. will cut into your bass significantly, which may be OK for some tracks.

    ...or just move the mic a little farther back... :)
     
  9. Bryan T

    Bryan T Guitar Owner Silver Supporting Member

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    Definitely. I threw that in because it is in the instruction manual of my Beyer mics. I'd never really thought about using the filter that way, but I guess one could. The Beyers are weird, as the high pass frequency is at 250 Hz!
     

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