New multitrack wanted: hardware vs. software approach?

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by GibsonLives, Jan 26, 2013.

  1. supersoldier71

    supersoldier71 Member

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    Fayetteville, NC
    Go with a DAW. I use a free version of Cubase that came with my Zoom HD16CD. A "dedicated" laptop would be ideal, but not required. I'm typing this post on the laptop I use.

    Once you get it up and running, five minutes on Youtube will get you in the game recording, and soon enough, you'll have some nice shortcuts to improve workflow, and networking with other users will give you a lot of information as well.

    I've used hardware, and for simplcity, it is very hard to beat, but as soon as it's time to start editing, having a visual representation that can be moved around and auditioned is really hard to beat.

    I have created a template in Cubase so that whenever I want to lay down a new song sketch, all of the features common to all my music are already present: percussion, instrument and vocal tracks, with the levels set so I won't clip when I start recording. From there I can record the instrument (or MIDI--let's not go down that rabbit hole) part as many or as few times as I want to get it right, and then, if all it was was a riff or melody piece, save it for later, or keep working.

    I like it so much, I'm actually going to pay MONEY for the full Artist version soon.
     
  2. GibsonLives

    GibsonLives Member

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    Thanks, everyone. As mentioned, I'm uh, "lucky" not to have the money just yet, which gives me plenty of time to research my options before plunking down a buttload of cash on something I may later regret. (Of course, I've regretted previous purchases even after months of deliberation, but then, haven't we all?) :)
    Steve
     
  3. plord

    plord Member

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    Charlotte, VT
    For what it's worth, I switched to a DAW about a year ago after being a committed Akai DPS24 user for over 10 years. The standalone, prosumer quality HD recorders are going extinct very fast as far as I can see. The Tascams are ok, maybe a little light on inputs depending on what you want to do. I have *never* cared for the sound of the Roland/Boss units.

    So the solution I ended up with is an Allen and Heath FW mizer, the Zed R16, feeding a Mac with Reaper. Reaper is cheap, very full featured, no dongle or other nonsense, does what I need with very little hassle. I am confident it will be updated and available for quite some time. I am madly in love with the R16, which can act as a 16 channel FW interface to the DAW, as a control surface for the DAW, as an analog summing mixer for recorded tracks. The UI is straight money, flipping between these modes is a single button push per channel so you can do some really creative routing on the fly.

    My $0.02
     
  4. franksguitar

    franksguitar Member

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    Fairfield, CT
    I still use my Korg 16 track D1600 with optical connections and 16 track tape. For ideas I use my Ipad with Garage Band.
     
  5. revelator62

    revelator62 Member

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    Jul 4, 2010
    Any recommendations on Cubase tutorials on You tube? Where to start?

    Any tutorials on how to create a template?

    thanks

     
  6. paulscape

    paulscape Member

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    I got a Roland VS2000CD off the TGP emporium for cheap and still use it today. Been using it for like 7 years and never felt the need to upgrade. I do mastering on the PC but having manual sliders, VGA out, expansion boards and simultaneous inputs is a real bonus. As a guitarist I can just plug in and play. My band just recorded drums on the weekend and everything was really easy and efficient. Sorting out effects routing can be complicated on them though. Every time I use it I feel like I have to relearn what the hell its doing regarding effects.

    I will sometimes rip tracks individually onto a software program and cut and paste more easily or add effects I just can't do on the roland. The beauty about an old school multi-track is I focus more on performance and great overdubs rather than endlessly playing around on a computer with gimmicks, however I know I will eventually seek out something more computer based further down the line.
     

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