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New to recording software

Discussion in 'Recording/Live Sound' started by pvlcassic30, May 23, 2011.

  1. pvlcassic30

    pvlcassic30 Member

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    So my question is what is the main difference between Logic Pro, and Pro Tools? Currently using a PC but have a way to run Logic in a virtual machine so the Mac isn't currently necessary.
    Ultimately I want to get into a recording career, just wondering if its a waste to learn Logic at home when ill probably be using Pro tools later?

    Also, could I get some suggestions on an inter-phase to use for the mixer, mics, etc.
     
  2. kludge

    kludge The droid you're looking for Silver Supporting Member

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    If you're a SERIOUS recording engineer, whether you're using Logic or Pro Tools or Reaper or Sonar or whatever does not matter. DAW software is utterly, utterly overrated. The core functionality of each one is identical.

    I'd say start with Reaper. It's simple, sensible, and powerful, and when you get to the expensive "pro" stuff later, you'll really wonder what makes them worth 10x the price.

    But seriously, software doesn't matter! Can you mix? Can you track? Do you know how to get good levels without clipping? Can you place mics carefully? Can you deal with a singer having a nervous sobbing breakdown in front of you? Do you know where that TRS-XLR adapter is?

    Actual recording practice with ANY software is not a waste of time. Worrying about whether software you've never actually used is a waste of time is, in fact, a waste of time.
     
  3. pvlcassic30

    pvlcassic30 Member

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    makes sense. Im just starting out, but I can understand how mic placement, mixing, tracking, etc. are important. Likely more important than software, just a general question I thought id ask to get some input. Thanks.
     
  4. gixxerrock

    gixxerrock Member

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    kludge's advice is spot on IMO. My personal preference is Logic, but running it inside of a virtual machine in a PC seems a very bad way to go. The advantages (debatable) of Logic over the others will compeletely be negated by the headaches this route will cause.
     
  5. kludge

    kludge The droid you're looking for Silver Supporting Member

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    Indeed. The thought of trying to run something like Logic in a virtual machine on a Windows box is... horrifying. The countless hours you'd spend trying to make it work (and keep it stable) would buy you a new Mac with the money you'd make slinging fries at McDonalds.

    Right now, I switch back and forth between Reaper and Reason/Record, depending on my needs. I've also used Nuendo and Tracktion extensively (like, completed albums extensive). I could work with any of them, or Logic or Pro Tools or Sonar, with only a bit of learning curve. Different DAWs mostly just make certain tasks a bit easier. Like I said, they're all the same in the end, all doing the same jobs - audio track recording and editing, virtual instruments and effects, mixing. Likewise, all the hair-splitting over various eq, compressor, reverb etc plugins is silly. They all do basically the same things (one of my big reasons for liking Record is it gets me out of the VST plugin chaos).

    Don't worry about which one is "professional". That's a bunch of BS. What's professional is getting out there and working, and not getting all preoccupied with brand names. Just get something that works up and running ASAP, and start recording and mixing. Learn how to get the best, most appropriate sounds out of the gear you have. Learn what works well, and why. Practice is what gets you there, not gear. The same mic placed the same way in front of the same instrument sounds identical, whether it's recorded into Logic or Pro Tools or Audacity. Worrying about DAW software is like worrying about whether you need leather or cloth seats in your car to drive to Chicago.

    And if you really, seriously want to be a professional recording engineer, first, you're insane. Second, you need to know what REALLY matters - having a place to work, building a (paying) client base, keeping your business finances in order, protecting your reputation. Until you have a few significant recording projects under your belt, you don't have a reputation, and you don't have a client base. In order to not starve, you need to make $1000/mo or so profit from your work. That leaves you NOTHING financially for buying gear. That's just eating and sleeping somewhere better than a highway overpass. That means two clients a month at $500 each, assuming you can get yourself two clients that pay $500. And when you consider studio fees (or the cost of building/owning your own), that number skyrockets.

    So think long and hard about the "professional" side. I love recording, but I'd rather gnaw my own arm off than try to make a living at it.
     
  6. cookieshoes

    cookieshoes Member

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    Agreed with what's been said. The first step imo is the interface/DAW you're working with. They all come with free software included. Start there and practice practice practice.
     
  7. Nelson89

    Nelson89 Member

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    I wouldn't even attempt to run Logic on a virtual machine...if you wanna learn logic buy a mac...otherwise don't learn it. Like its been said, it doesn't matter what software you really use, the things you have to learn is how to mix, how to bus, how to use compression, EQ, Reverb, how to automate....all of these things don't change from DAW to DAW...i started with Cubase on a PC, but have since used protools, logic, audition, reaper, i can tell you that the biggest learning curve was learning the first one, because that's where you learn all the basic's, the only thing that changes after that is workflow. In other words, start with whatever you can get your hands on and learn the basics.
     
  8. Julia343

    Julia343 Member

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    Forget running anything on a virtual machine. Virtual OS stuff sucks. It always has, and it always will. Run something that runs well on the platform you have.

    The two big names are Pro Tools and Logic. Both are pretty anal about what kind of machine you have. You must have a Mac for Logic. You can have either a Mac or Windows 7 machine for Pro Tools 9, but for the Windows 7 version you need to check Avid's system specs.

    My advice to you is to sign up for a class that teaches something like Pro Tools. That way you can buy the academic version which is identical except for the price tag. Make sure your machine can run it, though.

    If you don't want to take a class, grab Reaper for $40, unless you're going to use a ton of soft instruments -- the midi editing is the major drawback of Reaper. Reaper is fine for audio.

    I'll second the biggest learning curve being the first DAW you learn. I started with Pro Tools on the PC and now use both Pro Tools and Presonus Studio One Pro (this was developed by some former Steinberg employees). Studio One is pretty lightweight on processors and RAM. I'm really liking that DAW, and the support is excellent at this time. Sound On Sound is now starting a regular column for Studio One Pro.

    The upshot here is that no single DAW is going to be perfect. Each does some things well and some things not so well. So pick one, and stick with it for at least a couple years until you learn what you need to learn.

    Learning to mix properly takes a lot of time. There is no quick and easy way.
     
  9. Motterpaul

    Motterpaul Tone is in the Ears

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    Just Fyi: just to run Protools at home you need to buy some hardware made by Avid (or M audio) - so that is a small investment.

    Plus - if you run the windows version of ProTools the computer specs are very specific - a lot of people (most) end up building a dedicated computer to spec for ProTools. Or else they buy a Mac.

    Finally, the recording studio business is not what it used to be. I remember when there were hundreds of small business studios working full-time, because people needed to record there. But now you can record album quality tracks at home. The need for pro-studios for demos and such has really diminished.
     
  10. dudu

    dudu Member

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    I second Reaper. Its developers are nothing short of amazing, always listening to user requests. It has top notch documentation and a very friendly community built around it. Performance-wise it humiliates other DAWs.

    The demo version is 100% functional and stays like that. How many vendors give you that nowadays?
     
  11. Julia343

    Julia343 Member

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    Not any more. Version 9 only needs a compatible computer. The M-Audio Fast Track Pro is good for a home studio, though and pretty inexpensive. Just make sure you power it with a wall wart even though it will power via USB.

    I also suggest this package for a start instead: http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/AudioBoxStu
    You get the artist version of Studio One. The upgrade to the Pro version runs $200. It is basically this if you upgrade straight away. You pay $399 Studio One Pro and get the hardware part for $49. But you order the Audio Box Studio and the upgrade. Great deal for starting up and learning. Note: the artist version does not support third party plugins.

    This is becoming true. You CAN produce it. However, the studios can do stuff like record a band better than about 90% of home studios. To get something like a small business studio set up to be successful costs a ton of money.
     

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