New year's resolution: reasonable picking-speed target?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by ninjaaron, Dec 28, 2017.


  1. The Axecutioner

    The Axecutioner Member

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    No, what I said is the first thing, changing strings is the next step after that.
     
  2. The Axecutioner

    The Axecutioner Member

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    I think practicing on a single string is the best way to get those subdivisions down as well, when I was doing this, I'd put on a fairly high tempo 8th note drum beat, say 130 and lock in to the 8th notes and then challenge myself to trying 16th notes which is where the tremolo picking helps to get that speed motion as long as you're doing everything in time, otherwise you slow it down until it is, then bump it up again and so on. As another mentioned, the challenge after is playing 3 notes on a string and then changing to the next and getting that clean at the speeds you want to reach but never before getting your picking hand working like clockwork.
     
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  3. Sascha Franck

    Sascha Franck Member

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    Sorry, but I totally disagree - and it'd also not be in line with any logical practice layout.
    Imagine you'd go for that one string tremolo. You might be able to play 16th notes at, say, 160BPM rather easily.
    Then, after that, you introduce string changing - and that will slow you down *massively*. Not a good idea at all.
    Picking practice should be laid out following "daily demands". And picking on one string only isn't exactly what we do, it's picking on multiple strings.
     
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  4. ninjaaron

    ninjaaron Member

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    I'm inclined to disagree. It depends on the genre. A lot of metal rhythm parts invovle sixteenth notes on a single string. In fact, I'd say tremolo picking on a single string occurs in most styles of music much more frequently than sixteenth-note based riffs and passages.
     
  5. Sascha Franck

    Sascha Franck Member

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    Well, if you want to only increase your one string picking speed, more power to you. But if you want to generally improve your speed, you should practice everything that is involved.
     
  6. ninjaaron

    ninjaaron Member

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    The songs I've been having trouble with that I want to get cleaned up mostly use single-strings rhythm riffs.

    While I think it would be fun to learn to shred, it certainly isn't a priority. I'm perfectly happy just to get my sense of subdivisions sorted out for single-string rhythm parts before I try to tackle anything that would be wildly inappropriate in the kind of music I actually play in front of other humans.
     
  7. The Axecutioner

    The Axecutioner Member

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    Well I'm just explaining what worked for me and it helped me go from not being able to play fast with alternate picking, to picking very fast and accurately in a matter of months and make picking over several strings a lot easier which is the aim of the game. Also another great way to refine your alternate picking I found is to get a 5mm or thicker pick and practice picking with that. It'll be like picking with a rock at first but because you don't need much wrist movement, going back to a regular picking, you keep that in economy of wrist movement and you end up with a better relaxed technique. This all helped me out no end with my playing but we're all different. Some, it takes years to develop, for others with the right approach, it takes months.
     
  8. Brettski

    Brettski Member

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    I guess we're talking about two different things. I suppose a better way to explain my particular approach is to incorporate economy picking into a healthy diet of alternate picking. It's organizing these technologies along with spacing out the frequency of each left hand finger actuation that really frees you up to play faster. Greg Howe is another example. There's a very high degree of deliberate efficiency in his playing.

    Also, I'd avoid separating DWPS and economy picking in your mind. Economy picking requires a pick slant, but a pick slant does not require economy picking thus zakk wilds 2nps playing. But if you watch him long enough, you'll see lots and lots of economy picking. Same with EJ. I can copy a lot of his licks (and you can too if you approach them the right way) and I know how he operates. There were probably better things to spend like four years studying though.
     
  9. DanPaul

    DanPaul Silver Supporting Member

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    I have an extremely unorthodox method of alternate picking. Since my wrist doesn't pivot I either have to use my forearm by either moving it up and down or rotating it like Eddie Van Halen does when he tremolo picks. I used to practice quite a bit and got to be fairly fluid with it but still seemed like a lot of wasted energy.

    Does anybody else suffer from this stiff wrist syndrome? I've thought about starting over and making my wrist move. I've been playing since about 1978 and this would be a major change with results not guaranteed if I can't make my wrist cooperate.

    Any thoughts, tips and suggestions are highly appreciated!

    Thanks,

    Dan
     
  10. ninjaaron

    ninjaaron Member

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    I used to move my wrist for picking, but I stopped because I saw a bunch of videos of pros saying not to! I just move my forearm now. I think you're on the right track.
     
  11. DanPaul

    DanPaul Silver Supporting Member

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    Thanks Aaron!
     
  12. Sascha Franck

    Sascha Franck Member

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    Any examples? I have hardly ever seen any "pro" moving his forearm much (unless it's for rhythm strumming).
     
  13. The Captain

    The Captain Member

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    Probably need to careful with the terminology there. I'm seeing a lot of supination/pronation movement in my arm, with is visible at the wrist, although actually happening in the elbow.
     
  14. ninjaaron

    ninjaaron Member

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    I'm talking about wiggling your wrist back and forth.
     
  15. Sascha Franck

    Sascha Franck Member

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    Most pickers main movements come from the wrist, regardless which term you use to call it out.
     
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  16. The Captain

    The Captain Member

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    Chappers did a reasonable analysis, IIRC, and noted taht the fater he goes, the more elements of his arm become involved.
    It's worth being specific about joint movements.
    At teh elbow there are effectively two types of movement. Ther eis flexion extension, and ther eis supinaiton/pronation, which is the radius rotating. That's where most of the movement is.
    At teh wrist, the elbow rotaiton is expressed, but there is also a little abduction/adduction, not much flexion/extension.
    Unless you are using specific terminology , confusion reigns.
     
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  17. BenoA

    BenoA Member

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    Jumping in. Interesting and inspiring thread.
     
  18. jvin248

    jvin248 Member

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    .

    My perspective is, and it's from a 50 yo not a 16 yo...
    Watch the Troy Grady youtube series for the cool perspective, Pebber Brown for technique (he taught Buckethead);
    But spend your time emulating BB King. Listeners are far more impressed by the emotions pulled from the strings than by how fast you can hammer out 32nd notes.

    .
     
  19. Samarasa

    Samarasa Supporting Member

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    Before you go the old "incremental metronome increase" route, please watch this Ben Higgins video. His premise is that you start with a proven fast right hand technique, specifically single-note tremolo. I would recommend this strongly over the prevailing wisdom of starting with your existing right hand technique and trying to just do that faster.

     
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  20. ninjaaron

    ninjaaron Member

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    Great video! Thanks for posting! Definitely great tips I can use.
     

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