NGD - now returned for refund

Zado

Member
Messages
2,343
John Suhr about the matter: "'All guitars will have a dead spot some place unless they are made out of concrete.

The more alive the guitar is the more dead spots you will have. PRS are not exempt either and even had a kit they would ship you to try and move the dead spot to an area that doesn't bug you as much. Changing mass in the headstock will move it like even different tuning gear buttons

A good finger vibrato would go a long way in letting the note regenerate itself as well !'"

hes-right-you-know-32644960.png

 

AltecGreen

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
2,229
Update on this: after discovering a dead spot at the 12th fret on the 3rd string, I returned it to the shop; they were going to send it back to Schecter to look at. I got a phone call today: Schecter's distributors said that dead spots are unavaoidable; there's no guarantee that another guitar would be any better and so they're not prepared to take it back and look at it.

My refund is being processed and I'm feeling pretty anti-Schecter at this moment...


All guitars (and basses and ukeleles.....) have dead spots. They also have live spots. It varies from guitar to guitar where the location is.


Surprisingly, this has been studied quite extensively in the scientific literature. I recently did a literature search and found quite a few papers.

The classic paper is by Helmut Fleischer and Tilmann Zwicker in 1999.
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/233653803_Investigating_Dead_Spots_of_Electric_Guitars


A more extensive paper is by Arthur Paté et al
https://www.researchgate.net/public...ecay_time_of_solid_body_electric_guitar_tones
 

Bertiman

Member
Messages
2,053
That sucks... I let go of a really nice P90 SG because of a couple of dead spots. I think there may be some confusion in this thread between less resonant spots and actually dead spots. Kinda like the difference between more resonant spots and full on wolf notes.
 

skullfunkerry

Member
Messages
657
All guitars (and basses and ukeleles.....) have dead spots. They also have live spots. It varies from guitar to guitar where the location is.

Surprisingly, this has been studied quite extensively in the scientific literature. I recently did a literature search and found quite a few papers.

The classic paper is by Helmut Fleischer and Tilmann Zwicker in 1999.
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/233653803_Investigating_Dead_Spots_of_Electric_Guitars

A more extensive paper is by Arthur Paté et al
https://www.researchgate.net/public...ecay_time_of_solid_body_electric_guitar_tones

I have heard of guitars having dead spots before, and I've seen weights you can clip onto the headstock which are supposed to alleviate the problem... I've never encountered it before, though. The issue I had with it was that it was right in the middle of a position where I spend a lot of time playing, and none of my other guitars have it - so it would have just sat gathering dust while I played them instead. If it was a £200 Squier I probably would have lived with it, but it was the third most expensive guitar I've ever bought
 

skullfunkerry

Member
Messages
657
Sorry the guitar didn't work out for you! Why would that leave you feeling anti-Schecter? Sounds like they made it right quickly, and they're not wrong.

True... I guess in my mind I was thinking that they would replace it, but to just shrug it off seemed a bit harsh... probably just me

John Suhr about the matter: "'All guitars will have a dead spot some place unless they are made out of concrete.

The more alive the guitar is the more dead spots you will have. PRS are not exempt either and even had a kit they would ship you to try and move the dead spot to an area that doesn't bug you as much. Changing mass in the headstock will move it like even different tuning gear buttons

A good finger vibrato would go a long way in letting the note regenerate itself as well !'"

hes-right-you-know-32644960.png

Yep, this is true. However, in this case, it wasn't enough and the note died anyway. I never thought about changing the tuners... could have put a set of locking ones on if I had
 

Zado

Member
Messages
2,343
Honestly it'd make no sense replacing the guitar cause it has a dead spot with another one which would 90% have a dead spot as well.
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
37,172
Schecter's distributors said that dead spots are unavaoidable; there's no guarantee that another guitar would be any better and so they're not prepared to take it back and look at it.
The truth comes out!:eeks
You have to seek the dead spots before you buy or dare not to seek them after as you may find more than you wish.:omg
 

GaryMcT

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
3,493
I have a couple of custom order guitars from different builders that have dead spots. Is kind of a bummer. Makes me less likely to buy before trying again.
 

skullfunkerry

Member
Messages
657
Honestly it'd make no sense replacing the guitar cause it has a dead spot with another one which would 90% have a dead spot as well.

I wondered about that... it would be a different piece of wood though wouldn't it; what are the chances that it would have a dead spot in the same position?
 

metropolis_4

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
8,071
I think returning a new guitar that has a dead spot that you know is going to bother you is a smart thing to do. You know it's going to keep bothering you, so why spend your money on it? Get your refund and move on rather than battling with it. There are plenty of other fish in the sea.

But it's not really Schecters fault. It's just an inherent problem in guitars. I've had guitars that cost 4x the price of a Reaper have problems with dead spots.
 




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